Mapfre, Volvo Ocean 65 - © Tom Gruitt/CWL

Mapfre, Volvo Ocean 65 – © Tom Gruitt/CWL

 

Two world speed sailing records fell today in the Sevenstar Triple Crown series at Lendy Cowes Week, subject to ratification by the World Speed Sailing Record Council.

The Spanish Volvo Ocean 65 Mapfre completed the 50 mile course around the Isle of Wight in 3 hours, 13 minutes and 11 seconds, setting a new outright Around Isle of Wight world record by a monohull yacht.

Her time was 6 minutes 58 seconds ahead of that set by Mike Slades’ 100ft ICAP Leopard in 2013. Unlike the Volvo Ocean 65s, ICAP Leopard has powered winches. Mapfre therefore also beat the previous world record for a monohull without power assistance by an impressive margin of more than 36 minutes.

Propelled by winds gusting to 40 knots on the south side of the Isle of Wight, the next four boats in the race – Team Brunel, Team Akzonobel and Dongfeng Race Team – also beat the previous record times.

“We had a good start, were able to control the fleet a bit, and then we were always in the lead,” said Mapfre skipper Xabi Fernandez. “It was a very close race with the other boats, there were some very fast moments, and it was great fun.”

“We were delighted with this first opportunity for the fleet to compete together and show their speed at Lendy Cowes Week’s Sevenstar Triple Crown.” added VOR race director Phil Lawrence.

“It was fantastic to see such a long-standing record being broken,” says Wouter Verbraak, head of Racing Yacht Logistics at Sevenstar Yacht Transport. “We’re now looking forward to seeing other record breaking yachts and their crews raising the bar still further at the next Sevenstar Triple Crown.”

 

More information at www.cowesweek.co.uk

 

 

Bequia - Candy Store Cup 2017 Overall and Class B winner (Photo © George Bekris)

Bequia – Candy Store Cup 2017 Overall and Class B winner (Photo © George Bekris)

 

 NEWPORT, R.I. (July 31, 2017) – Sailors couldn’t have asked for a sweeter experience at the 2017 Candy Store Cup Superyacht Edition. The event showcased some of the world’s most spectacular and technologically sophisticated luxury sailing yachts racing off Newport, R.I. on Thursday through Saturday (July 27-29) and provided three days of wildly varied conditions, courtesy of Mother Nature, as well as a full slate of colorful social events, courtesy of co-hosts Bannister’s Wharf and Newport Shipyard, the latter of which was headquarters for the event and home to most of the fleet while not racing.
 

 

At Saturday night’s prize giving at a Newport estate on Ocean Drive, the 92-foot yawl Bequia was declared overall winner and awarded the silver Candy Store Cup Trophy in addition to its Class B victory prize of a glass vase filled with penny candy. Until then, no one was quite sure who would take the overall honors, due to the close racing that had taken place over three races, held one-per-day and covering from 12 to 26 miles each.

 

 

Thursday, in a 23.7-mile race that started off Castle Hill and featured Brenton Point and the Cliff Walk as scenic backdrops, the enormous superyachts struck imposing silhouettes against an overcast sky that every so often allowed the sun to peek through. The mid-range southwesterly winds allowed Bequia to set the pace with a 58-second win over Freya at the finish line, which was set just off Fort Adams as a “first” for the regatta, which debuted last year as a combination of two individual regattas previously known as Newport Bucket Regatta and Candy Store Cup.

 

Freya (Photo © George Bekris)

Freya (Photo © George Bekris)

When the wind switched to an ever-so-light northerly on Friday, Freya returned the favor by beating Bequia by a mere 43 seconds at the traditional finish line off Castle Hill. With the two boats now tied, it meant that Class B’s winner would be determined with Saturday’s final race. This was the case, also, in Class A, where Action and Sunleigh had three and four overall points, respectively, and Class C, where MeteorWhitehawk and Naema were tied with four points each.

Sunleigh (Photo © George Bekris)

Sunleigh (Photo © George Bekris)

 

On Saturday, a dogs-off-chains nor’easter demanded that the Candy Store Cup winners be especially deserving…and they were. Bequia handled the 25 knots like it was 15 and won the race after Freya was forced to retire with a split mainsail.

 

 

“We had a wonderful week sailing against Freya,” said Bequia‘s tactician Tom Whidden at the awards party. “We’re quite different boats, but obviously the handicap rule is doing a good job, and we had some really close racing. We felt badly they had a breakdown on the last day; we were looking forward to seeing how we’d do, and I think we would have been very close.”

Ranger (Photo © George Bekris)

Ranger (Photo © George Bekris)

Bequia‘s overall victory was contingent first on class victory, next by lowest point score among class victors (Action and Bequia both had four points each), and then by traditional sailing tiebreaker rules, but when the latter failed to clarify the winner, the race committee deferred to the regatta provision of “starting prowess” as the final determinant. That trait, it turns out, the extraordinarily well-sailed Bequia possessed in spades.

Meteor (Photo © George Bekris)

“How spectacular to have a medium-air, a light-air and a heavy-air race,” said Whidden, noting that despite the whipped-up seas on Saturday, the course allowed them to sail in relatively flat water. “They couldn’t have planned it better.”

Dan Meyers, the Newport/Boston resident who won Class C, skippering his 170′ schooner Meteor to finish positions of 1-3-1, agreed: “The first day was a perfectly moderate day, so nobody could complain. Friday, much to our detriment, it was light and a struggle for us but kind of fun to try to keep Meteor going on the track. And Saturday was full-on. A kite up in 30 knots keeps your attention, but it was fun. We had it all!
Wild Horses (Photo © George Bekris )

Wild Horses (Photo © George Bekris )

“This is different than any other superyacht regatta in the world,” added Meyers. “It’s run by a team of people who know how this is supposed to go; the courses were really well conceived, the classes were really well conceived…They made everything better: the social events are better, the racing is better, the new Thursday-through-Saturday format is better. It’s more fun…more friendly, but they don’t sacrifice on the sailing.”

NAEMA G Schooner (Photo © George Bekris)

NAEMA G Schooner (Photo © George Bekris)

 

Ian Walker, tactician aboard Class A winner Action, a 121′ sloop, said that for a boat that was built for cruising, Action was raced pretty hard. Action had to beat Sunleigh on Saturday to win, but Sunleigh chose not to sail in the conditions. Ranger had a problem with its mast track and had to retire, leaving Action as the default winner.

“I’ve really enjoyed this regatta,” said Walker. “I love that the boats are so close together on the docks here; it’s well supported by sponsors; there is lots of hospitality in a relaxed atmosphere; and obviously Newport is a beautiful place to be this time of year. You couldn’t wish for a better superyacht regatta, and in a way the fact that the Candy Store Cup is smaller and more intimate is its unique selling point.”

Shore-side parties included an owner’s dinner at the famous Clarke Cooke House on Bannister’s Wharf; a “yacht hop” on Friday at the Shipyard where hundreds of sailors milled around the M. GEMI pop-up store selling Italian leather shoes and sharing gelato in addition to a food truck that provided a hearty dinner for the hungry sailors.

Candy Store Cup headquarters ( Photo © Robert W. Kranz )

Candy Store Cup headquarters ( Photo © Robert W. Kranz )

 

 

Saturday’s prize giving hosted 400 people who got their last thrills of the regatta dancing to an Eagles cover band that could have easily been mistaken for the real thing.

Royal Huisman, Perini Navi, Vitters and Rybovich, which are major players in the superyacht industry and were all stewards of the Newport Bucket, are presenting partners of the Candy Store Cup. Supporting partners of the event are KVH Industries, North Sails, Sentient Jet, Southern Spars / Future Fibres, Willis Towers Watson, The Marshall Islands Registry, and M. Gemi.

Candy Store Cup Newport Results  
July 27-29, 2017

Class A Winner - Action at start crossing the start line Thursday's race. ( Photo © George Bekris )

Class A Winner – Action at start line Thursday’s race. ( Photo © George Bekris )

Class A
1. ACTION, 121′ (37m) Royal Huisman/Dykstra Sloop, 1-2-1, 4
2. SUNLEIGH, 105′ (32m) Jongert/Tony Castro Sloop, 3-1-4/DNS, 8
3. RANGER, 138′ (42m) Danish Yachts/S&S Dykstra Sloop, 2-3-4/RET, 9
Class B Winner - Bequia at race start on Thursday ( Photo © George Bekris )

Class B Winner – Bequia at race start on Thursday ( Photo © George Bekris )

Class B
1. BEQUIA, 92′ (28m) Brooklin Boat Yard/Stephens Yawl, 1-2-1, 4
2. FREYA, 88′ (27m) Nautor’s Swan/Frers Sloop, 2-1-5/RET, 8
3. WILD HORSES, 75′ (23m) W-Class Yachts/White, 3-3-2, 8
4. AUDREY II, 89′ (27m) Jongert Ketch, 4-4-5/RET, 13
Class C Winner - Meteor at the Breakers ( Photo © George Bekris )

Class C Winner – Meteor at the Breakers ( Photo © George Bekris )

Class C
1. METEOR, 170′ (52m) Royal Huisman/Dykstra Schooner, 1-3-1, 5
2. WHITEHAWK, 104′ (32m) Lie-Nielsen/Bruce King Ketch, 2-2-2, 6
3. NAEMA, 118′ (42m) Graafship/Hodgdon Yachts G Schooner, 3-1-4, 8
4. ZENJI, 184′ (56m) Perini Navi/Ron Holland 4-4-3, 11

More George Bekris Candy Store Cup Photos

More photos will be added to the gallery in coming week.

Follow Candy Store Cup on Facebook and Instagram.

#cancystorecup #cupracing #bucket #clarkecookehouse #bannisterswharf #newportshipyard #newportri #amazing #yachtinglife #lilrhody #RI #newport #CSC #freya #meteor #whitehawk #naema #zenji #bequia #wildhorses #audreyii #sunleigh #ranger #action

 

 

George Bekris Photography

Skippered by Charles Caudrelier, the Chinese Dongfeng Race Team will compete in the Rolex Fastnet Race as Leg Zero of the Volvo Ocean Race © Benoit Stichelbaut

Skippered by Charles Caudrelier, the Chinese Dongfeng Race Team will compete in the Rolex Fastnet Race as Leg Zero of the Volvo Ocean Race © Benoit Stichelbaut

 

Among the 400 boat fleet setting off from the Solent on 6 August in the Rolex Fastnet Race will be three of offshore racing’s most prestigious classes.

Grabbing the headlines will be the one design VO65s as the Rolex Fastnet Race serves as Leg Zero of the Volvo Ocean Race and it will be the first occasion the teams will have lined up in anger. Among the seven, three teams competed in the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race: 2nd placed Team Brunel; the Chinese Dongfeng Race Team, third last time and the Spanish MAPFRE team, which finished fourth. In one designs, experience is everything so these teams will have the edge, but crew from other boats in the last race have been distributed across the new teams too.

Dongfeng Race Team benefitted from being first to get sailing this time, picked their boat up post-refit late January. They have several of the same crew and have focussed more on the competition this time, says skipper Charles Caudrelier. “Last time we spent the first five months in China doing crew selection. We put 30% of our time into performance. This time we put in 70%.”
This year’s Rolex Fastnet Race will be Caudrelier’s third. In 2011, on the VO70 Groupama, they finished just behind Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing, whose time of 32 hours and 39 minutes remains the monohull record. “I like the race because it is interesting – short and complicated with lots of transitions,” says Caudrelier.
While Dongfeng is a favourite, late to the party is Turn the Tide on Plastic, skippered by Dee Caffari, their campaign was only announced mid-June.
Caffari is a big fan of the Rolex Fastnet having completed her first on a Challenge boat in 2001. She was on Team SCA two years ago:  “It is an ocean classic everyone wants to do. It covers such a range of boats and sailors, it is like an oceanic version of Round the Island Race.”
Having competed many times in the Rolex Fastnet Race, Sam Davies will be in the driving seat of Tanguy de Lamotte’s IMOCA 60, Initiatives Coeur ( Photo © Initiatives Coeur )

Having competed many times in the Rolex Fastnet Race, Sam Davies will be in the driving seat of Tanguy de Lamotte’s IMOCA 60, Initiatives Coeur ( Photo © Initiatives Coeur )

 

Former Team SCA skipper Sam Davies has returned to the IMOCA 60 class. She has taken over the Initiatives Coeur campaign from Tanguy de Lamotte but the two are sailing together for the rest of 2017.
 “Everyone is happy Sam’s in the driving seat. It is a great continuation for the project,” says de Lamotte. Davies, who also raced with de Lamotte in 2015, said: “I am very excited Tanguy gave me this opportunity. It is a project that I know every well – a cool boat, a cool team and cool charity project to be involved.” It supports Mécénat Chirurgie Cardiaque, which funds operations on children born with heart defects. They are sailing the foil-assisted IMOCA 60 that finished the last Vendée Globe in third.
As with the other eight IMOCA 60s competing, they are racing the Rolex Fastnet Race doublehanded. Before sailing the race together in 2015, de Lamotte won it twice in the Class40, while Davies’ first race was in 1995 on a Sun Legend 41 and she has done it countless times since.
They are up against the boats which finished first and second in the Vendée Globe: Bureau Vallée 2 (ex-Banque Populaire) campaigned by Louis Burton and Servane Escoffier, and Alex Thomson and Irish sailor Nicholas O’Leary on Hugo Boss.
For Thomson, the Rolex Fastnet Race has played a huge part in his sailing career. “My first was in 1995 on a Sigma 36 called British Eagle – it took just over seven days – but in that race I found my love for offshore racing. That’s the great thing about the Fastnet – it introduces people to proper offshore racing.” The 2003 race was the first occasion Thomson sailed under the colours of Hugo Boss, preluding a 14 year sponsorship deal.
This time, Thomson who is sailing with Nicholas O’Leary is hoping to beat the other IMOCA 60s but is bullish about taking on the larger boats in his foil-assisted weapon. “Downwind we’re quicker than a VO65 and if you give us the right conditions (22-25 knots, broad reaching) we can beat Rambler, but in the Fastnet you don’t get to choose the weather you sail in.”
Most significant in the Rolex Fastnet Race’s non-IRC line-up is the 34 boat Class40 fleet. In this are a mix of pro sailors and enthusiastic amateurs and boats ranging from state of the art reaching machines to old production boats. It is also one of the most international line-ups including Russia and Japan, Sweden, Norway, Austria, the Netherlands, South Africa and Oman.
The Rolex Fastnet Race will see 34 Class40s compete, including the newest, Louis Duc's Carac (150) ( Photo © Christophe Breschi )

The Rolex Fastnet Race will see 34 Class40s compete, including the newest, Louis Duc’s Carac (150) ( Photo © Christophe Breschi )

 

The Rolex Fastnet Race will be the first event for the newest, most radical Class40. Louis Duc’s Carac (150) is a Marc Lombard design and has the highest volume bow permitted under the Class40 rule. The latest models from all the leading Class40 designers are competing such as Brieuc Maisonneuve’s Cap Des Palmes, a Guillaume Verdier Tizh 40; Norwegian Henrik Bergesen’s Hydra, a brand new Owen Clarke design; two new Sam Manuard-designed Mach 40 Mk3s, Maxime Sorel’s V And B and Catherine Pourre’s Eärendil.

President of the Class40, Halvard Mabire, is racing Campagne de France, a new boat to his own design, with his English partner Miranda Merron. Mabire’s first Fastnet was in 1977. “It was on a small plywood boat with hard chines. It was one of the slowest Fastnets in history – very very light all the way. I did it again in 1979, which was not the same story.” He has since done the race as part of the Admiral’s Cup and on a Maxi One Design. “The Fastnet is one of the oldest races. It is very nice to have this race – we know it will happen every two years. It is good that the RORC opened it to multihulls, IMOCA 60s and Class40s.”
As to the form, the favourite is, for once, not French, but from the Channel Islands. Following his 2006 Route du Rhum victory, Phil Sharp has returned to the Class 40. His yacht Imerys currently leads the 2017 Class40 championship, following their second place in the recent Les Sables-Horta-Les Sables race.
Jersey's Phil Sharp on Imerys currently leads the 2017 Class40 championship ( Photo © Andy Le Gresley )

Jersey’s Phil Sharp on Imerys currently leads the 2017 Class40 championship (Photo
© Andy Le Gresley )

The Rolex Fastnet Race starts from off Cowes at 1100 on 6 August.
How to follow:
  • All the latest news, race updates, video, photos, blogs from the boats + Live streaming of the starts: Race minisite: http://fastnet.rorc.org/
  • Twitter: #rolexfastnetrace @RORCracing
  • Facebook: www.facebook.com/royaloceanracingclub
  • Instagram: instagram.com/rorcracing
  • Coverage on Fastnet TV & Radio: Cowes – 87.7fm, Plymouth – 87.9fm and online http://879fm.uk/
  •  Virtual Regatta – check the race minisite closer to the start to sign up for the game

Meteor © George Bekris

For the second year running, the Candy Store Cup Superyacht Edition will showcase some of the world’s most spectacular yachts racing in a regatta designed specifically for them. The event, scheduled for Thursday through Saturday, July 27-29, is organized and hosted by Newport Shipyard and Bannister’s Wharf, which partnered last year to consolidate the Newport Bucket and Candy Store Cup regattas.

The largest yacht entered thus far is the 184’ (56m) Perini Navi ketch Zenji, which will join the other entries at Newport Shipyard’s newly expanded docks alongside dozens of other megayachts, both sail and power. The working shipyard has become the epicenter of the megayacht industry in New England and is uniquely positioned on the Newport waterfront to allow the public to view the yachts that are berthed there.

 

The Candy Store Cup is all about sportsmanship and camaraderie, as the pristine superyachts must race to rules specially formulated to keep them safe distances from each other. The format calls for pursuit-style (staggered start) racing on Rhode Island Sound, with one race planned for each of the three days, leaving plenty of time in the afternoons and evenings for socializing. Racing begins at 1 p.m. off Castle Hill and will provide a stunning visual for those watching from vantage points along the shore of Narragansett Bay’s East Passage, south of the Pell Bridge. The Candy Store Cup Party and Awards are on Saturday at 7 p.m.

Royal HuismanPerini NaviVitters and Rybovich, which are major players in the superyacht industry and were all stewards of the Newport Bucket, are presenting partners of the Candy Store Cup Newport. Supporting partners of the event are KVHNorth SailsSentient JetSouthern Spars / Future FibresWillis Towers WatsonThe Marshall Islands Registry, and M. Gemi.

Newport Shipyard, one of the most popular and recommended shipyards in the U.S., is a full-service marina and shipyard with over 3,500 linear feet of dock space that can accommodate yachts up to 300+ feet. Its amenities include a dockside café, ship store, fitness center, courtesy vehicles and crew housing. Bannister’s Wharf, founder of the original Candy Store Cup in 1977, is situated in downtown Newport and attracts visitors and locals alike with 20 shops and galleries that offer a diverse selection of life’s niceties. The social center of the Wharf is the Clarke Cooke House, home of the original Candy Store Cup.

 

PRELIMINARY CLASS BREAKS (UPDATED JULY 13, 2017)

CLASS A:

Action – Sloop – 37m – Royal Huisman – Dykstra
Ranger (J) – Sloop – 42m – Danish Yacht – S&S / Dykstra NA
Sunleigh – Sloop – 32m – Jongert – Tony Castro

CLASS B:

Audrey II – Ketch – 27m – Jongert – Jongert
Bequia – Yawl – 28m – Brooklin Boat Yard – Stephens
Freya – Sloop – 27m – Nautor’s Swan – Frers
Wild Horses – Sloop – 23m – W-Class™ Yachts – White

CLASS C:

Meteor – Schooner – 52m – Royal Huisman – Dykstra NA
Naema – 42m – G Schooner – Graafship – Hodgdon Yachts
Whitehawk – 32m – Ketch – Lie-Nielsen – Bruce King
Zenji – Ketch – 56m – Perini-Navi – Ron Holland

 

Newport Shipyard Candy Store Cup aerial view ( Photo © Billy Black )

 

Thomas Coville, skipper of maxi trimaran Sodebo Ultim', July 4, 2017 NYC ( Photo © George Bekris )

Thomas Coville, skipper of maxi trimaran Sodebo Ultim’, July 4, 2017 NYC ( Photo © George Bekris )

 

THOMAS COVILLE Beats the North Atlantic solo record and also comes in under the 5 day mark.

4 DAYS 11 HOURS 10 MINUTES 23 SECONDS *

The World Tour recorder crossed the North Atlantic in less than 5 days. The skipper of the trimaran Sodebo Ultim’ , Thomas Coville, set a new record North Atlantic solo crossing record.
After the world record solo this winter, Thomas Coville becomes the fastest on the North Atlantic as well. The skipper of Sodebo Ultim crossed the finish line at Cape Lizard (South Point of England) today, Sunday 15 July at 7:29 pm (French time).

Maxi Trimaran Sodebo Ultim’ © YVAN ZEDDA / SODEBO

His time was 4 days 11 hours 10 minutes 23 seconds * (subject to WSSRC validation): a historic journey time, as the solo sailor falls below the 5-day mark. With this exceptional solo time, It beats 15 hours 45 min 47s the very recent time of Francis Joyon realized the 13 of July.

Distance traveled on the water: 3039 nautical miles – that is 5628 km
Average speed: 28.35 knots (26.87 knots on the orthodromy)

Maxi Trimaran Sodebo Ultim' prior to leaving NYC to set North Atlantic Record ( Photo © George Bekris )

Maxi Trimaran Sodebo Ultim’ prior to leaving NYC to set North Atlantic Record ( Photo © George Bekris )

 

After crossing the line, Thomas Coville will remain all night at sea with his team who will have joined him on board to convey the boat to his home port of La Trinité-sur-Mer.
Sodebo Ultim ‘will arrive at the entrance of the Channel of the Trinity on Mer (Morbihan) Sunday afternoon around 16h00 for an arrival at the pontoon at 17h00.

 

Landmarks
Departure Ambrose Light in front of New York: Tuesday July 11 at 8 hours 18 min 37s French time
Arrival at Cap Lizard: Sunday 15 July at 19 hours 29 minutes French
time Crossing the North Atlantic alone: ​​4 days 11 hours 10 minutes 23 seconds *
3039 miles traveled at an average of 28.35 knots

 

Francis Joyon before leaving NYC to break his own Solo Transatlantic Record on IDEC SPORT (Photo by George Bekris)

Francis Joyon comes early this morning to add a new line to his legend. He beat his very own solo crossing record set in June 2013 on his old 29-meter IDEC trimaran by exactly 49 minutes. He repeated this weekend aboard the maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT, the same plan VPLP on board which he last winter, crewed the Jules Verne Trophy record. For its first solo transatlantic aboard this giant originally designed for a crew of 12 men, it improves the mythical time between New York and Cape Lizard “to the Joyon”, without any previous preparation or standby , No sophisticated weather routing, just talent, envy and incredible ability, at the age of 61,

By cutting the longitude of Cape Lizard, which marks the finish line of the North Atlantic crossing record from Ambrose Lighthouse in New York City, at 03:00, 37 minutes and 02 seconds (French time) Francis Joyon beat his previous record by 49 minutes. The World Speed ​​Sailing Record Council will burn the time of 5 days, 2 hours, 7 minutes, on its shelves *. ” It was right ” just pointed out the sailor of Locmariaquer after a hard night, chanted by many maneuvers and gybes to reach the western tip of England. “I was happy to arrive because the last 24 hours have been very trying,” continues the king of the Atlantic. “My autopilots functioning badly, I had to bar permanently these last 24 hours,

Francis Joyon on IDEC SPORT in NYC on July 4, 2017 (Photo © George Bekris)

At 61, Francis Joyon realizes a new maritime, physical and sporting feat, in a totally unprecedented context for a record of this scale. ” I left New York in a hurry, ” he says. ” I did not even have time to take care of the bunkering. I just could buy some eggs and bananas. As for food on board, the guys (sic) had eaten everything during the crossing of The Bridge 2017. ”

Francis Joyon ( Photo Pierrick Contin / DPPI / IDEC )

Ad-hoc weather window point studied for a long time since the earth with the help of professional routers. Joyon had to do with what the Atlantic had to offer this Thursday evening July 6th. ” The weather was not good and all day one, I pulled up the wind edges. But the next day, a system was set up. I then saw the Queen Mary 2 returning to Europe. I thought that since we had not been able to beat him on the outward journey from Saint-Nazaire, I might be able to arrive in Brittany before he joined Southampton. (Where it is expected tomorrow Thursday ndlr). I got caught up in the game and attacked. I spent two days at more than 30 knots all the time. I feared the arrival on Europe because the wind was blowing from the North East. But the Azores anticyclone had the good idea to go up a bit and allow me to land in the Channel with southwest winds. ”

New York’s “tear-away” party, Joyon also discovered his own IDEC SPORT maxi trimaran. ” I did a lot of stupid things when I sent gennakers, because I used to sit on superstars at the Jules Verne Trophy. In fact, it is as if I were going back to school to relearn the A-ba of the boat. Fortunately, it is very tolerant, even at 30 knots … “

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT ( Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

Francis Joyon, who is satisfied with the task accomplished, will agree a few minutes of sleep this morning, while making his way to his home port of La trinité sur Mer, which he hopes to rally as soon as possible …

  • Pending ratification by WSSRC

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT (Photo by George Bekris)

 

#FrancisJoyon #IDECSPORT #THEBRIDGE2017 #record #transatlantic #Joyon #NorthAtlantic

 

 

The Clipper Fleet 2015 © onEdition

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race, the biggest event of its kind and one of the world’s most incredible endurance challenges, is looking for adventurous Washington State residents to take on the challenge of a lifetime and achieve something extraordinary in its next edition.

The Clipper 2017-18 Race will feature a Visit Seattle team entry for the second consecutive race, and it’s not too late to sign up to join the action.
On Wednesday, 12 July, 16:00, at the Washington Athletic Club, race organisers and the Seattle Sports Commission are hosting a recruitment talk featuring current and former Clipper Race crew from across Washington State.

Clipper Race Crew Recruitment Director David Cusworth, himself a circumnavigator in the 2002-03 edition, says: “More and more people are looking for something different these days, something extraordinary that will really push their limits and test the boundaries of what they thought they were capable of.

“Seattle and its residents really embraced the race when we first visited the city so its incredible to see many now taking on this awesome challenge for themselves, and there is still the opportunity to join them for this unique challenge.”

Crew can choose whether to take part in the whole circumnavigation, which takes an awesome eleven months to complete, or one or more of its eight legs.

Fifteen Washington State residents are already training for the upcoming challenge. They include 25 year-old Nicole Stull, an event coordinator from the city who had no sailing experience before signing up for the adventure.

Nicole will join the race for Leg 7, which will see her set sail from her home city, Seattle, to race more than 6,000 nautical miles to New York, via the Panama Canal.

 

She says: “Seeing all of the boats parked at Port of Seattle’s Bell Harbor marina when the race first visited Seattle in 2016 really in-sighted the feeling of being a part of something, and I hadn’t even signed up yet! I loved how much the city embraced the race as well, especially the Visit Seattle boat.

 

“I chose Leg 7 because I wanted to set sail on this crazy adventure from my hometown of Seattle. Going through the Panama Canal was another aspect of this leg that really excited me because it’s such a historic and monumental passage that not many people get to experience.”

 

Now in its twenty-first year, the Clipper Race, which was founded by legendary sailor Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, the first man to sail single-handed and non-stop around the world in 1968-69, is unique. It is the only event where people from all walks of life, regardless of previous sailing experience, can race around the world under sail.

 

Each of the fleet of twelve ocean racing yachts is sponsored by a destination or brand around the world and each team is led by a professional skipper. The Visit Seattle yacht aims to build a legacy following the relationships made through direct engagement with companies, cities and countries on the Clipper Race route; engage with international Clipper Race partners and provide opportunities to increase international trade links with the US.

The Clipper Race is open to anyone over the age of 18 at the time the race starts, but there is no upper age limit. More information about the race and how to RSVP to the event can be found on the Clipper Race website: http://clipperroundtheworld.com/events-calendar/event/crew-member-presentation4

The Clipper 2017-18 Race starts from Liverpool, UK, on Sunday 20 August and will take approximately eleven months to complete, taking in six continents and crossing 40,000 nautical miles of the world’s major oceans.

The twelve-strong race fleet, including the Visit Seattle team, will arrive into Seattle in April 2018 after racing over half way of its epic voyage around the world.

MACIF arrives in New York City, July 3, 2017 (Photo © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.)

François Gabart and the crew on MACIF win THE BRIDGE 2017 Ultime Trimarans – Centennial Transat race as they crossed under the The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on July 3rd at 13:31 EST. The crew consisting of François Gabart – skipper, Pascal Bidégorry, Guillaume Combescure, Antoine Gautier, Benoît Marie and Yann Riou. They crossed in 8 days, 31 minutes and 20 seconds. The boat crossed the atlantic averaging 18.6 kts.

MACIF Crew at press conference (Photo © George Bekris)

The race pitted the Queen Mary 2 against four Ultime trimarans skippered by some of the greatest names in Ocean Racing. François Gabart – MACIF, Francis Joyon – IDEC SPORT, Thomas Coville – Sodebo Ultime and Yves Le Blévec – ACTUAL.

François Gabart © George Bekris

They left Saint-Nazaire on June 25th UTC for the 3068.4 nm transat. The trimaran skippers faced headwinds during much of their race as a result they raced a longer race in terms of actual miles than the Queen Mary 2. They also had some areas of very calm winds reducing their boat speed.

  • © George Bekris

The QM2 could follow a more or less straight line to the finish minus the exclusion zones for ice formations and Cetaceans. The Queen Mary 2 did stray into the ice exclusion zone for a short time before correcting causing them a penalty.

  • © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.

IDEC SPORT, skippered by Francis Joyon placed 2nd when they crossed under the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge at 8 days 11 hours 9 minutes 3seconds. The crew covered this transat with an average of 17.2 kts of speed. We spoke to Francis Joyon following his arrival in New York and he said he plans to head back across the atlantic solo on Friday July 7th on IDEC SPORT. He stated this will be the first time he has a chance to sail IDEC SPORT solo and he wants to take this opportunity to get to know his boat without crew. 17.2 kts average speed.

  • © George Bekris

Sodebo Ultime crossed 3rd despite having an injured crewman on Tuesday, July 4 at 05:18:55 EST. Just 50 miles behind IDEC SPORT. They completed the race in 8 days,16 hours,18 minutes, 55 seconds with a 17.04 kts average speed.

Thomas Coville, the current round the world solo record holder, was in good spirits after arrival and was happy with the time they made coming in as they passed the Statue of Liberty right after dawn. They were able to complete the race without evacuating the injured Thierry Briend until they passed the finish. He was then transferred to a RIB and taken for medical attention as a precaution.

© Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co. NEW YORK CITY – USA , 4 Juillet 2017

Coville commented on dealing with his injured friend and crewmate after arriving at the Atlantic Boat Basin ““We were all very worried when Thierry had his problem,” Colville said. “I’m not going to discuss the whole race through this, but it really did affect us. He was knocked flat on his back and then the other way, face first onto a winch. He was incoherent for a few hours and couldn’t remember what had happened. The doctor said evacuating him from the boat wasn’t the right thing to do because it was best to keep him out of the elements. You need to have a very professional crew running the boat, so that when you have an injury, like Thierry had, you can manage it properly. We managed to race the boat to the finish and the situation with Thierry at the same time.”

  • © George Bekris

ACTUAL finish off the race and concluded the race when they arrived in New York on July 5th, at 10.28 pm and 58 seconds. They arrived in the night with spotlights highlighting the crew and boat against the Statue of Liberty as they passed.

  • © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.

The event concluded for the Ultime Trimarans with the award ceremony at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan on July 6, 2017.

  • © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.

Although the rest of the MACIF was on hand for the ceremony and to accept the award. François Gabart had to appear via live video because he had to return to France where his wife is expecting a baby at any time.

New York Yacht Club awards presentation. (Photo © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.)

The event concluded for the Ultime Trimarans with the award ceremony at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan on July 6, 2017.

THE BRIDGE 2017 (Photo © George Bekris)

Crew of IDEC SPORT
Francis Joyon
Alex Pella (ESP)
Sébastien Audigane
Gwénola Gahinet
Clément Surtel
Quentin Ponroy

Crew of ACUTAL
Yves Le Blévec
Samantha Davies
Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant
Davy Beaudart
Stanislas Thuret

Crew of Sodebo Ultime
Thomas Coville
Jean-Luc Nélias
Vincent Riou
Billy Besson
Loïc Le Mignon
Thierry Briend

Crew of MACIF
François Gabart
Pascal Bidégorry
Guillaume Combescure
Antoine Gautier
Benoît Marie
Yann Riou

Damien Grimont, Organiser of THE BRIDGE, is raised overhead by the MACIF Crew after they docked at The Atlantic Basin (Photo © George Bekris)

 

Visit George Bekris Photography for more photos of THE BRIDGE 2017 Maxi Trimarans and Crews 

Visit THE BRIDGE 2017 for more Information and Statistics about the Maxi Trimarans Race