Beautiful Start (Photo © Tim Wright / Photoaction.com )

Nelson’s Dockyard was the quintessential venue for the 30th celebration of the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta sponsored by Panerai. For the final evening of a jam-packed week, the historic grounds blossomed with lights, tents, and a magnificent stage filled with glittering trophies.

The evening set for honouring a fleet of winners began with the beating drums of the Royal Antigua and Barbuda Police Band. Captains, crew and revellers congregated before the stage, anxiously awaiting the results of races and special presentations to outstanding yachts and sailors.

The Governor General of Antigua and Barbuda, the Honourable Dr. Rodney Williams, acknowledged the significance of holding the ACYR in the recently designated UNESCO World Heritage Site. “We are honoured that almost 50 classic yachts have come to Antigua from all corners of the world, mostly under sail,” he said. “I understand one of you quoted “wooden boat enthusiasts or gluttons for punishment? Is there any difference?

This year’s entertaining announcer was Tommy Paterson, assisted by a Mount Gay rum and ginger ale. Praise and appreciation were given to Shannon Falcone’s committee boat and to Archie Bailey, Winston and Janeild for their excellent work in setting the marks each day. One by one, sailors took the stage as winners were announced. Dress for the evening was varied. Most teams sported clean crew shirts but some donned evening attire while the crew of the 52’ Skagen gaff ketch Samsara pirated the stage with swords held high, a clear winner of the prize for Best Dressed Crew. The men and women of the 77’ Fife yawl Latifa regaled the audience in floral pareos.

Winner of the Seahorse Studio Trophy for Spirit of the Regatta was 66′ Faiaoahe

Highlights from the evening included the presentation of the Kenny Coombs Memorial Trophy to the 42’ Carriacou Sloop Genesis; the Anne Wallis-White Trophy for Smallest boat awarded to the 30’ Alden Cutter, Calypso; and winner of the Seahorse Studio Trophy for Spirit of the Regatta was Faiaoahe, a 66’ Spirit of Tradition sloop. Full results are available at www.antiguaclassics.com79’ Fife yawl Mariella won the Mount Gay Rum Trophy and coveted Panerai watch

It was most fitting, that after an extensive refit in Italy, the Antigua flagged 79’ Fife yawl Mariella, returned to Antigua to win the Mount Gay Rum Trophy, winner of the most competitive class. Topping that outstanding accomplishment, she also won the coveted Panerai watch, awarded to the boat with the lowest total corrected time from Traditional,Vintage or Classic Class. Carlo Falcone and his army of supportive crew took the stage for a well-deserved photo op and an explosion of cheer from the crowd.

Cannons shot off, ship horns blasted and the sky filled with fireworks. Music erupted from the lively band The Strays and the party took off in style. When it ended is a well-kept secret.
At the end of Race 4, there was a unanimous decision amongst the fleet that the Regatta Committee ordered and received flawless weather. Wind speed started today at 16 knots climbing steadily to the low 20s, turning the last day of racing into a grand finale. Nearly 50 yachts, with sun, clear skies and the Caribbean’s sassy seas turned the waters off Antigua into an artistic masterpiece. For those following the race through the lens of a camera, it was a dream come true.

Spirit of Bermuda’s spinnaker was the most notable
On the Windward course, flying sails popped out for the broad reach after the first mark. The three-masted schooner Spirit of Bermuda’s spinnaker was the most notable, emblazoned with a dark and stormy seal, until it self destructed and took a swim.

Dramatic close calls today
There were some dramatic close calls today – nicely executed, of course! Rounding the mark at Old Road Bluff saw a few traffic jams as boats hardened up for the beat while manoeuvering between the beach and tight tacking duels. It was definitely not the place for indecision.

Upwind work was wet and wild and on the final reach, knot-metres got a workout, some hitting the mid teens. Every boat fought hard and no matter what the numbers say, everyone finished a winner for taking part in the 30th Antigua Classic Regatta. Full race results can be seen at www.antiguaclassics.com

Yachts came to Antigua with purpose. Rittler Sighe, owner of Tilly XV, gave up a quest to scale the 7 summits of the world, replacing it with sailing his Sonderklasse Gaff Sloop at all 7 Panerai Classic Regattas.

You’re not going to find a collection of boats like this anywhere else
Class Lehmann and Sophie Heyer on Hera, their Abeking and Rasmussan yawl, sailed across the Atlantic in December with their 6-week-old daughter to take part. Judging by the party near their boat each afternoon, it was well worth the effort.

Praise for this year’s ACYR is flowing like beer in the Presidente Garden. Michael Higgins of the gaff rigged cutter Samara T said of this year’s event, “Fantastic. Great to be here in Nelson’s Dockyard. So wonderfully unique. You’re not going to find a collection of boats like this anywhere else.”

Mike Brown, the owner of the 50’ Hedges headsail schooner, Russamee added, “It’s an endless sailing party. How could you ask for anything better? I guess we’ll know more after tonight!”

Spirit of Tradition yachts – photo by Ted Martin
Four boats finished today holding all firsts: the 42’ German Frers Vagabundo II; Adix, a 178’ Holgate 3 Masted Gaff Schooner; Chloe Giselle, a Sean McMillan 65 Spirit Sloop; and Chronos the 157’ Klaus Roder Staysail Ketch. Their victories will be celebrated tonight along with dozens more at the glamorous Trophy Presentation and Party on the lawn of Nelson’s Dockyard in front of the Copper and Lumber Store. Before it starts, an amazing slideshow of top photographic shots on the big screen will give the audience a chance to relive the week.

The sailing is over but not the need to party
The sailing is over but not the need to party with friends old and new. Live music from The Strays will kick off a night that everyone hopes will never end.

The Gig Racing and Cream Teas take place tomorrow afternoon at the Admiral’s Inn. It’s a do-not-miss event with sailing, sinking and plenty of humour.

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Sailors at the RORC Easter Challenge left Cowes this Easter Sunday sunburned, full of chocolate and brimming with freshly acquired wisdom about their sport.
Across the 50 boat fleet competing at the RORC’s three day long domestic season opener, that doubles as its annual training regatta, it was close across most classes, but none more so than IRC One. In this, Mike Greville’s sparkling Ker 39, Erivale III managed to lose her three point lead in today’s opening round the cans race and the victor was only decided on the final, head down, charge for the finish line in race two.Ultimately Roger Bowden’s King 40, Nifty (ex-Tokoloshe 1), claimed first overall, two points ahead of Erivale with another King 40, Cobra, another point behind. As Nifty’s skipper Sam Cox recounted: “Coming into the finish [of race 2], Zero pipped us and we had Erivale III and Zero II stacked up right behind us. All weekend we’ve been having really good boat-on-boat racing between us – it was fantastic.

Three races were scheduled today, but the wind dropped as the new breeze attempted to settle towards the end of the first race, causing the course to be shortened for IRC Two and Three. With the wind shifting dramatically, it took three attempts to get what was to be the second and final race underway Within IRC One, there was a match race between the two Mark Mills-designed MAT 1180s. Tor McLaren’s two week old Gallivanter got its first taste of glory, winning today’s opening race, However sistership, Christian Zugel’s Tschuss, finished seven points ahead overall McLaren appreciated the coaching laid on by the RORC, spearheaded by Jim Saltonstall and Eddie Warden Owen and supplemented by North Sails UK staff: “We were very happy with the way we performed. We were together upwind – which we weren’t on day one. The groove is very narrow and main and runners have to be trimmed in sync. The crew work at the front is really good and our tactics were great.”

 

Star performer throughout the regatta was Sir Keith Mills’ Invictus in the FAST 40+ class, racing within IRC One. With a 1-3 today, the black Ker 40+ won the regatta by a mighty 11 points. However it was not easy and all five of the FAST 40+ had their moments with Tony Dickin’s Jubilee looking particularly strong today, leading the opening stages of race two, which was eventually won by Mark Rijkse’s 42° South.”The first race was tough,” recounted Mills. “We were third at the first mark, but managed to climb back and get a comfortable win. Then, in the second race, we didn’t get the greatest start but we kept our place all the way round and we had a photo finish – 42° South got it, but there was half a boat length between three boats,which made it really interesting.”

In IRC Two, a late charge from RORC Admiral Andrew McIrvine on La Réponse was enough to get his First 40 onto the podium but not enough to make an impression on the race for the lead between David Franks’ JPK 10.10 Strait Dealer and Redshift Reloaded, the Sun Fast 3600 belonging to Ed Fishwick.While La Réponse claimed today’s first race and Strait Dealer the second, Redshift Reloaded posted a 2-3 to win overall by three points from Franks’ yacht. “The first race was tricky,” recounted Nick Cherry, with whom Fishwick will be racing double handed for the remainder of the season. “It went light and at one point we were looking pretty bad and La Réponse ditched us. In the last race, we only had to finish five points behind Strait Dealer, although we were worried we were OCS. Also there were some big shifts, but they were reasonably predictable.”For the Redshift crew, winning on this the boat’s first major competitive outing is a big achievement: “We are very pleased,” summarised Cherry. “The boat was going quick. The crew did well and it was nice tight racing.”Fishwick praised the RORC Race Committee: “It is a well organised regatta and they did a really good job.”Aguila. The RORC Easter Challenge defending champion today put in a race win and a 2.5, to reclaim IRC Three by 7.5 points from Ian Braham’s MG 346, MS Amlin Enigma.”It was fantastic conditions – it couldn’t have more different to last year when it was very windy,” said Laidlaw. “This year it was light and puffy and quite difficult. Today was challenging with the wind up and down and in the second race we had a good ding-dong with Bullet – they sail really well. It has been close racing all weekend.”The regatta wound up with a prizegiving at the RORC’s Cowes clubhouse where the winners left laden with trophies and Easter eggs.

Photos © Barry James Wilson

 

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

Easter Challenge Cowes 2017 (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

MALTESE FALCON by Rupert Peace

 

The 35th America’s Cup in Bermuda will feature the fastest yachts in the 166 year history of the competition for the oldest trophy in international sport. The sailors racing those yachts, known as America’s Cup Class (ACC) yachts, are supreme athletes, comparable to NFL linebackers or Olympic sprinters in terms of power output and athletic ability, and the crystal clear, turquoise waters of Bermuda provide the perfect stage on which to run the greatest race on water.

However, the 35th America’s Cup is not just about racing on Bermuda’s waters. The events are also going to play host to one of the greatest gatherings of superyachts in history. These incredible boats, beautiful to look at and awe-inspiring in size and impact, will add to the sheer spectacle of the America’s Cup, as well as adding yet more numbers to the thousands of people travelling to Bermuda to witness what many experts are already saying could be the greatest America’s Cup yet.

Superyachts are a very important part of the America’s Cup and, reflecting the high value of their role in the events that will take place in Bermuda in May and June, a dedicated America’s Cup Superyacht Program was created by the America’s Cup Event Authority (ACEA), in conjunction with BWA Yachting. BWA Yachting played a central role in the America’s Cup Superyacht Program at the 34th America’s Cup in San Francisco in 2013. Their knowledge, expertise, and the trust the superyacht community has in BWA Yachting made them the perfect partners for the America’s Cup Superyacht Program in Bermuda in 2017.

Sam Hollis, COO of the ACEA, explains, “We have made great efforts to engage the global superyacht community and we are looking forward to showcasing some of the world’s biggest and most beautiful superyachts at the heart of our event. We are offering incredible access for owners, including front row viewing of the race course, premium berthing at America’s Cup Village and experiences and opportunities that, really, money can’t buy. We are aiming to exceed their expectations, which of course is a hard objective to achieve, but with the hard work and dedication of all our partners I am confident that we will do just that. We are sure that this will be another aspect of the America’s Cup that will live long and positively in the memories of all those who take part.”

Stefano Tositti, CEO of BWA Yachting, added, “Through our experience and expertise we look forward to delivering the America’s Cup Superyacht Program, making it the experience of a lifetime for everyone who will join us at this exclusive event. BWA Yachting is proud to, once again, be partnering with the America’s Cup Event Authority to deliver the America’s Cup Superyacht Program, this time in beautiful Bermuda – perhaps the perfect setting for superyachts and the America’s Cup to come together again.”

“The exclusive America’s Cup Superyacht Program will bring a stunning number of superyachts to Bermuda, and their owners, guests and crews will be welcomed as part of the America’s Cup family,” explained Laura Esteve, BWA Yachting’s VP Americas. “BWA Yachting is honored to be part of this family and we look forward to providing impeccable services to our elite clients.”

The America’s Cup Superyacht Program was assisted hugely by special legislation passed by the Bermuda Government for the 35th America’s Cup enticing superyachts to come to Bermuda. Brand new superyacht marinas have also been built at the heart of the America’s Cup Village at Royal Naval Dockyard and at Front Street in Hamilton, the capital city. Together with marketing support from the Bermuda Tourism Authority, these initiatives have enabled Bermuda to engage the global superyacht community and really put Bermuda on the map for superyachts.

The original America’s Cup Superyacht Program had 39 berths allocated for superyachts coming into Bermuda from all over the world. Due to overwhelming demand, that number was extended to 50 berths and the total allocation is now very close to being sold out, with just one berth left for a megayacht and an extensive waiting list of superyachts ready to join the action should spare berths become available.

The America’s Cup Superyacht Program is not just about beautiful yachts watching the action. It also incorporates racing with the America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta, being run from 13 – 15 June in conjunction with Boat International. 19 superyachts are already entered, including Adela, the 55 metre superyacht which won the 2013 America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta, and a long list of enquiries is being assessed for additional entries.

Last, but clearly by no means least (and for some, the ultimate expression of America’s Cup history), is the America’s Cup J Class Regatta. This will take place on 16, 19 and 20 June and will feature some of the most iconic boats in the history of the America’s Cup, with eight of the nine existing J Class boats committed to participating in three days of racing scheduled around the first weekend of the America’s Cup Match presented by Louis Vuitton.

For superyacht owners, the 35th America’s Cup is a must-stop destination in 2017. For admirers of the most impressive, beautiful yachts on the planet, the America’s Cup Superyacht Program, the America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta and the America’s Cup J Class Regatta will combine to create what could be one of the greatest gatherings of the world’s most impressive boats ever – that itself is reason enough to join the action in Bermuda from 26th May to 27th June 2017. Tickets for the America’s Cup are available online at www.americascup.com/tickets.

 © JM Liot / DPPI / IDEC SPORT

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

The World Speed Sailing Record Council has ratified three intermediate records set by IDEC SPORT

After ratifying the extraordinary performance of the maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT sailed by Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Clément Surtel, Gwénolé Gahinet and Sébastien Audigane around the world, the World Speed Sailing Record Council, the international body, which certifies major sailing records, has just officially recorded three new intermediate records achieved along the way.
Indian Ocean record between Cape Agulhas and Tasmania, which already belonged to Francis Joyon and his men, was shattered by more than a day between 29th December 2016 and 4th January. It now stands at 5 days, 21 hours, 7 minutes and 45 seconds.

IDEC SPORT also slashed almost a day off the South Pacific record set by Bruno Peyron and the maxi catamaran, Orange in 2005 (8 days, 18 hours and 8 minutes). Joyon and his crew took just 7 days, 21 hours, 13 minutes and 31 seconds to sail the distance between Tasmania and Cape Horn.
Finally, the intermediate reference time between the Equator on the way down and the Equator on the way back now stands at 29 days, 9 hours, 10 minutes and 55 seconds, replacing the time set by Loïck Peyron aboard the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V of 32 days, 11 hours and 52 minutes.
As a reminder, the time of 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds is now the outright round the world record from Ushant to Ushant via the three major capes, Good Hope, Leeuwin and the Horn, referred to as the Jules Verne Trophy record.
The WSSRC has recorded the following reference times:
Dates: from 16th December 2016, start at 0819hrs UTC, to 26th January 2017 at 07:49:30 UTC.
The international body recorded an average speed of 21.96 knots over the theoretical distance of 21,600 miles.
Francis Joyon and his men actually sailed 26,412 miles out on the water, at an average speed of 26.85 knots.
They shattered the previous record held by Loïck Peyron and the crew of the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V by four days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 23 seconds.
 Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

by  Barby MacGowan

The second day of the Bucket Regatta saw six new winners in six classes after the 38-strong fleet sailed a long “Not So Wiggly” course around and through the smaller islands and prominent rock formations lying to the north and west of St. Barths. Performances turned in by the victors (Unfurled, SPIIP, Axia, Rosehearty, Koo and Hanuman) also translated into new teams atop the leaderboard in four of the five pursuit classes as well as the J Class when cumulative scores were tallied.  
After yesterday’s race around the island, Rosehearty sat in third in Grandes Dames as did Unfurled in Gazelles. Both are defending champions and made a point of saying they were far from being counted out. Unfurled’s victory today put her in second overall, only one point behind yesterday’s leader WinWin, while Rosehearty’s gave her a tied point score with Meteor for first (tie-breaker rules give the nod to Rosehearty) and dropped yesterday’s leader Perseus^3 to third.

 Even with all the “ins and outs” of the course, Rosehearty never put her spinnaker up. “It was pretty windy (18-20 knots), and we had broken our spinnaker earlier in the week, so it was a risk vs. reward thing,” said Rosehearty’s tactician Paul Cayard. “We had good tactics and lay lines, sailed in all the right places and were able to hold everybody off without it.” Cayard saw Perseus^3 deploy its kite and have some problems, which may have contributed to the team’s fourth-place finish. “The angles just weren’t right for us to put it up; it was a little painful to go slow but the right thing to do when racing these boats.”

 Near the end of the race, two boats from another class were ahead of Rosehearty, slowing it down, while Meteor was advancing quickly from behind. “We focused on staying in front of Meteor; otherwise, they were going to pass us and they’d be winning the regatta.” 

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 In Les Voiles Blanche class, Koo also stakes her first-place position on a tied overall point score with yesterday’s leader Q,  while in the Elegantes, P2 trails leader SPIPP by only four points for second, tied on point score with Sojana.

 P2’s tactician Tony Rey said his team spent last night repairing a spinnaker that blew out yesterday, causing the team to start their three-race series with a fifth-place finish. “The pressure is higher when you are dealing with your own adversity,” he said with a chuckle this morning before racing, “but today will be windy and not so wiggly. This is a course that separates the men from the boys. It sounds innocuous and benign, but it’s plenty wiggly for these boats.”

 In Mademoiselles, today’s winner Axia, also a defending champion, is now in third overall, tied in scoring with two others behind her, while Adela stands between her and overall leader Wisp from yesterday. According to Axia’s tactician Robbie Doyle, his team’s seventh yesterday hurt them, but mathematically, it’s still possible for them to win. “Wisp has to make a mistake, but mistakes are made, as we’ve proven,” he said.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 The J Class had a glorious day of sailing, starting off with a thrilling 2.5 nm downwind leg. Yesterday’s leader Velsheda suffered a penalty after the start, clearing the way for Hanuman to lead the entire way around the 26-mile course.

 All to say, there are no runaway winners going into tomorrow’s final day of racing when a race around the island, this time clockwise, will conclude the on-water competition.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

The Bucket Stewards collaborated in 2016 to establish a new criteria for the coveted Bucket Trophy.  With the racing format having changed in recent years, the emphasis is now directed to class racing. This has provided an opportunity to reestablish a quantitative criteria for the overall winner of the Bucket Trophy.

The ‘Bucket Trophy’ will be presented to the overall winner of the 2017 St Barths Bucket. Yachts eligible for the prestigious award will be the class winners with five or more yachts in class.The class winner who prevails in the ‘most competitive, closely contested class’ will be the overall winner.

 The class with smallest series point differential between first and fourth place finishers will receive 1 point with each class in succession receiving 2, 3, 4 or 5 points. Additionally, the class with the least overall time differential (total time/total distance for all races) between the first and fourth place finishers will receive one point, with each class in succession receiving one additional point as above.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 The above mentioned points will be added together for the overall competitive class score.  The class with the lowest number of points will be considered the ‘most competitive, closely contested class’.

 The winner of this class will be the overall winner of the 2017 edition of the St Barths Bucket.

 Should there be a tie, the class winner with the most yachts in class wins. In the event the tie remains unbroken, starting prowess will determine the overall winner (total time for all starts, from scheduled start to crossing the line – with the smallest total time prevailing).

Special Needs Children Project

St Barth schools have 40 special needs students with various motor and cognitive challenges. Outside the school system there are other island children with even more severe disabilities. The existing program facilities and services are not adequate to help these children and their families thrive.

This project supports the island’s first dedicated, handicap-accessible space suitable for assessment, treatment and coordinated support services, and provides the additional special educator and psychological services these children need to achieve greater autonomy, better school integration and a better quality of life.

The 2015 St Barth Bucket was proud to contribute to this initiative of the local St Barth Lions and Rotary Clubs.

Watch replay of all St. Barths Bucket Regatta races on TracTrac

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 

 

Volvos in Newport 14 May 2015  Photo © Dan Nerney

Volvos in Newport 14 May 2015  (Photo © Dan Nerney)

NEWPORT, RI (17 March 2017) – The public is invited to attend the Sail Newport Volvo Ocean Race press conference and Pep Rally on Tuesday, March 21 starting at 10:00 a.m.   The major announcement will feature speakers from the Volvo Ocean Race and Sail Newport.

The press conference will be held at Belle Mer, 2 Goat Island, Newport, RI, USA. The public is invited to attend as space permits and coffee will be served starting at 9:30 a.m. at Belle Mer.
“We’re encouraging sailing fans to come and help us show Newport’s excitement about the Volvo Ocean Race coming back to Rhode Island,” says Brad Read, executive director of Sail Newport.
Also, Sail Newport will host a reception to celebrate the announcement at the Clarke Cooke House, at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday.  Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and cash bar will be available.
The Volvo Ocean Race Newport Stopover in 2015 was a huge success as over 130,000 people attended and enjoyed the racing, entertainment and hospitality of the public shore side festival. The Race starts October 22, 2017 from Alicante, Spain and will make its only North American stop in Newport, RI, May 8-20, 2018.
LIVE STREAMING:
The event will be live streamed for those who can’t make the event. Check the home page at sailnewport.org on Monday for information.
The Volvo Ocean Race
The Volvo Ocean Race is the ultimate ocean marathon, pitting sport’s best sailors against each other across the world’s toughest oceans.  The legendary race that began in 1973 will start from Alicante, Spain in October 2017 and finish in The Hague, Netherlands in June 2018.  Featuring almost three times as much Southern Ocean sailing as in the previous edition, the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18 will be contested over the longest distance in the race’s history at around 45,000 nautical miles, crossing four oceans and taking in 12 major cities on six continents.
The Volvo Ocean Race has been the global sponsorship flagship of Volvo Group and Volvo Car Group since taking ownership of the race in 1999.  The Volvo Ocean Race is operated as a non-profit organization.
ABOUT THE VOLVO OCEAN RACE NEWPORT STOPOVER
The only North American Stopover of the Volvo Ocean Race will be hosted by Sail Newport, Rhode Island’s Public Sailing Center, the State of Rhode Island Dept. of Environmental Management (DEM), Discover Newport, and the City of Newport.  This two-week stopover celebration and festival will be open to the public for free and will include a Race Village (opens May 8, 2018) with entertainment, a marine Exploration Zone (opens May 12, 2018), kids activities, a food court, team compounds, sponsor pavilions and a theater.  On-the-water activities and sailing events are scheduled for each day such as Try Sailing for families, M32 and other sailboat racing, up-close viewing of the race boats at dock and racing during the Pro-Am Race, the In-Port Races, and the boat parade and Leg Start to Cardiff, Wales (May 20, 2018)  All sailing will take place within yards of the Race Village on the shoreline at Fort Adams State Park.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta boats in action (Photo © Cory Silken)

The 30th edition of the St Barths Bucket will sail back into St. Barths  March 16-19. This year the fleet is 38 beautiful superyachts including six J Class boats battling it out for the historic Bucket trophy. Beyond the sailing, there’s a strong emphasis on ‘winning the party’ rather than the race, and as such, owners, guests and crew can look forward to celebrating in unparalleled style after hours.

In 1995, the beautiful French island of St Barths hosted its first Bucket Regatta and it has done so in March every year since then. Although the size of the yachts and competing fleet has grown significantly, the spirit of the event has remained unchanged. In recent years, 40 or more superyachts have gathered to compete for the Bucket in glamorous St Barths.

The magic in St Barths takes place both on and off the water, when the owners and crews fill the yacht haven before and after racing, with the special yacht Hop taking place on the Saturday evening. In keeping with the tradition, Perini Navi will host owners and guests at Casa Perini for memorable evenings overlooking Gustavia throughout the week.

The entire fleet will compete to take home the ‘Bucket’ trophy. While the stunning silver Perini Navi trophy will also be presented to the best classified Perini Navi competing in St Barths, won in 2016 by the talented crew onboard P2.

“We continue the commitment to maintaining the legendary “Spirit of the Bucket” — that wonderful balance of camaraderie,competition, sportsmanship and, of course, fun,” say the Event Stewards.

“Magnificent yachts from around the world are here for incomparable racing in the unspoiled waters off St Barthélemy. With many of the world’s most elegant and impressive superyachts in attendance, a fantastic J Class, and the debut of the Les Voiles Blanche (Corinthian Spirit) class, together we will write another distinguished chapter in the history of this regatta,” added the organizers.

 About teamwork:

 “We try hard to keep the same crew, because continuity is important to everything,” said Seahawk’s captain Gerhard Veldsman. “The more you can keep the same people, the better you end up sailing the boat, because everyone ends up knowing its limitations.”

 About evolution:

“The Superyacht game is heating up at a pretty rapid pace, and all in a good way,” said Peter Holmberg, helmsman of Rosehearty . “The owners are wanting to play harder and  faster, so the competitive side of it is going up and up and up. But like any segment of a sport that grows at this rate, you always have parts that are not up to speed.  A while back, safety was our first concern: we didn’t have clear rules to keep us all safe, so we realized that was a weakness in the game. (Ed: ISAF’s Appendix SY and heightened overall awareness has helped). Then the rating became the challenged portion of this game and the ORCsy Rule was developed and brought in here last year to fix that.”

 About the ORCsy Rule

“We’re happy with the system and how it rates the boats, because it’s creating exactly what we want out of pursuit superyacht racing, where it’s all about the tactics and good sailing coming into the finish,” said P2’s tactician Tony Rey. “Considering how different these boats are from each other, it’s quite an achievement for the ORCsy to have done this in one year, to be able to step back and just let us race each other and have it be this close on the score sheet and on the water. The basic concept is that they’ve used much more of a database analysis of the performance of the boats; there has been great transparency in terms of how they are coming up with the ratings; and they are listening to the owners and sailors.”

 About the experience:

“It’s almost heart stopping when you duck another J, because the helmsman turns the wheel and it’s 10-20 seconds before anything happens other than working out his arms,” said Ranger’s navigator Peter Isler, “The delays in ducking, close tacking or making any quick maneuver are just wild; it’s not like driving your sports car. It’s all judgement.”

What They Said… about the 016 St Barths Bucket Regatta

 “It’s a gathering, a rendezvous: a celebration of these great yachts, the owners , the crew and friends, with a regatta in the middle.” -Bruce Brakenhoff

Charities helped each year by the Bucket Entrants

 Each year the Bucket Regatta designates a portion of the entry fee for donation to a meaningful non-profit program in St Barths.

The Youth Sailing Program at the St Barths Yacht Club will receive the 2017 donation.

The St Barths Yacht Club is an active sailing school and their priority is the youth of St Barths. Here the children learn to respect each other and their environment, the sea. They also learn how to be responsible and cooperative in the pursuit of their goals.

SBYC offers many programs starting at very early ages. On an island learning to sail is as important as learning to swim. The St Barths Yacht Club tries its best to motivate and support its young people. Over 400 children participate every year.

The SBYC is not a conventional yacht club. Resources and budgets are far more limited than what one would expect to find in a typical club. The Bucket donation makes a significant and meaningful difference.

What They Said… about the 2016 St Barths Bucket Regatta

 “It’s a gathering, a rendezvous: a celebration of these great yachts, the owners , the crew and friends, with a regatta in the middle.” -Bruce Brakenhoff

The Yachts

38 yachts will race in this year’s event, ranging from 30 – 88 metres in length and with a speed differential from the fastest to the slowest in fleet of over four minutes per mile. Entrants for 2017, divided into five different classes, include; Unfurled, built by Vitters in collaboration with designer German Frers and the winner of last year’s race; Maltese Falcon, the biggest (and arguably most recognisable) yacht in the regatta at 88m, built by Perini Navi for the late Tom Perkins; and the elegant 48m Wisp, launched by Dutch shipyard Royal Huisman back in 2014. This year’s event also marks the debut of the Corinthian Spirit Class (Les Voiles Blanche), which offers a more lighthearted alternative to what is becoming an increasingly competitive race. Yachts in this class, which include the 56m Perini Bayesian and the 43m Koo by Vitters, will have no spinnakers and will require far less race preparation – which organisers hope will address a downward trend in entry numbers. This year also sees a record six J Class boats (originally introduced in the 1930s to compete in the America’s Cup) taking part in the race, including the 43m sloop, Topaz and the 44m Lionheart, both built in the last decade using unrealised designs from the 1930s.

 You can track the boats on the course each day on  TracTrac 

Photo © Michael Kurtz

Pursuit Class Entries — ORCsy
Yacht Builder Designer Model
Action (37m) Royal Huisman Dykstra NA sloop
Adela (55m) Pendennis Dykstra NA schooner
Aquarius (47m) Perini Navi Perini Navi ketch
Axia (38m) Palmer Johnson S&S ketch
Danneskjold (32m) Performance Yacht Dixon sloop
Elena of London (55m) F.N.M. Herreshoff schooner
Elfje (46m) Royal Huisman Hoek ketch
Ganesha (46m) Vitters Shipyard Dubois sloop
Huckleberry (39m) Alloy Yachts Langan ketch
L’ondine (30m) Southern Wind Farr sloop
Leopard3 (30m) McConaghy Farr sloop
Maltese Falcon (88m) Perini Navi Dykstra NA schooner
Meteor (52m) Royal Huisman Dykstra NA schooner
Nikata (35m) Baltic Nauta / J/V sloop
Ningaloo (45m) Vitters Shipyard Dubois sloop
P2 (38m) Perini Navi Briand sloop
Perseus^3 (60m) Perini Navi Ron Holland sloop
Q (52m) Alloy Dubois ketch
Rebecca (43m) Pendennis Frers ketch
Rosehearty (56m) Perini Navi Holland ketch
Sojana (35m) Custom Farr Farr ketch
Spiip (34m) Royal Huisman Frers sloop
Sunleigh (33m) Jongert Tony Castro sloop
Unfurled (46m) Vitters Shipyard German Frers sloop
Varsovie (31m) Nautor Swan Frers sloop
Visione (45m) Baltic Yachts Reichel-Pugh sloop
Win Win (33m) Baltic Yachts Javier Jaudenes sloop
Wisp (48m) Royal Huisman Hoek sloop
Zenji (56m) Perini Navi Ron Holland ketch
Pursuit Class Entries – ORCcs Les Voiles Blanche (Corinthian Spirit)
Yacht Builder Designer Model
Bayesian (56m) Perini Navi Perini Navi sloop
Escapade (37m) Fitzroy Yachts Dubois sloop
Koo (43m) Vitters Shipyard Dubois sloop

J Class Entries — J Class Association Rating Rule

Yacht Builder Designer Model
Hanuman (42m) J6 Royal Huisman Dykstra NA sloop
Lionheart (44m) J1 Claasen Jachtbouw Hoek sloop
Ranger (42m) J5 Danish Yacht S&S / Dykstra NA sloop
Shamrock V (37m) J3 Camper / Pendennis Nicholsons / Dykstra NA sloop
Topaz (43m) J8 Holland Jachtbouw Frank C. Paine sloop
Velsheda (40m) J7 Camper & Nicholson Nicholsons / Dykstra NA sloop
TP52 Super Series Miami  (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

(Tuesday 7th March, Miami) – Just as they led after the first day of racing in Key West in January, Harm Müller-Spreer’s Platoon crew top the early leaderboard at the 52 SUPER SERIES Miami Royal Cup for after a dramatic first day of TP52 racing in brisk SE’ly winds and big, disorderly waves off Miami Beach.Platoon’s victory in the second race, gained in the closing stages of a fast final run, credits them with the overall lead on tie break from the Roemmers family’s Azzurra, which posted two consistent second places.

“It was a really good start for us. We had good speed and we made some nice comebacks and in that last race on the last downwind it was down to just a few metres, so that was good. It was really great racing. But of course tomorrow is all different, new situations and new challenges, but it is good to start well.” owner-helm Müller-Spreer smiled on the dock of the Miami Beach Marina where the 52 SUPER SERIES fleet is hosted.

The 16-20kts winds and the unruly swell kicked up by the strong winds of the last few days punished small errors and placed a real premium on well-coordinated crew work. Azzurra in second place lead Quantum Racing who are one point behind in third. With Bora Gulari steering his first 52 SUPER SERIES races Quantum Racing won the first race but did not get the start they wanted in the second contest, taking fourth.

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

But the toughest challenge at this second regatta of the 52 SUPER SERIES is that facing the Gladiator crew. Their new boat was hit by Sled during the second beat of Race 2, only the second race for Tony Langley’s team with their latest Gladiator, suffering a significant gash to their port topsides which eliminates the boat from further competition at the regatta.

The shore team and crew now aim to re-dress and step the mast on their previous Gladiator, which they aim to bring from West Palm Beach which is some 70 miles away, aiming to be ready for racing on Thursday. Sled suffered damage to the forefoot of their bow but hope to be back in action Wednesday.

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

Race 1: Gulari Shows His Mettle As Quantum Racing Opens With A Win
There may have been a new hand on the helm, but Quantum Racing carried forward the momentum from their impressive 2017 52 SUPER SERIES opening win at Quantum Key West Race Week six weeks ago.Bora Gulari, the team’s newest addition, moved from the strategist role to the helm for this event and showed that all his time sailing foiling moths and Olympic cataramans has prepared him well for driving these 52-foot thoroughbreds in some challenging conditions off Miami Beach.Quantum Racing was among a handful of boats, including Harm Müller-Spreer’s Platoon and Tony Langley’s new Gladiator, which controlled the front row off the starting line.
Azzurra, with Guillermo Parada at the helm and Vasco Vascotto calling tactics, didn’t have quite the same freedom early in that first leg, but made the critical call to hit the left side on the top third of beat and so squeaked past Quantum Racing around the first mark.
Those two boats battled nip and tuck down the first run with Azzurra holding the lead and choosing the left side of the next leg. It was the right which paid better for Quantum Racing which was able to take over the lead when the boats converged again midway up the second beat.

Azzurra pushed Quantum Racing hard on the final run, closing to within a boat length, but the American team held on for the win. Platoon was third with Rán Racing fourth and Provezza rounding out the top five.

Race 2: Platoon Steals A March With Win, Leads Overall
With John Kostecki calling tactics and Olympic gold medallist and America’s Cup winner Jordi Calafat on strategy the Platoon team displayed poise under pressure to win Race 2 of the 2017 52 SUPER SERIES Miami Royal Cup and grab the overall lead.From a four way final sprint to the finish line, the outcome of the second race was in the balance until the final metres. Platoon edged out Azzurra by only four second and were only six seconds ahead of Provezza.Miami Royal Cup. 52 SUPER SERIES. 
After Day 1, Two Races.
1 Platoon (GER) (Harm Müller-Spreer, GER) 3,1 4pts
2 Azzurra (ITA) (Roemmers Family, ARG) 2,2 4pts
3 Quantum Racing (USA) (Doug DeVos, USA) 1,4 5pts
4 Provezza (TUR) (Ergin Imre, TUR) 5,3 8pts
5 Rán Racing (SWE) (Niklas Zennström, SWE) 4,8 12pts
6 Alegre (GBR) (Andy Soriano, USA) 8,6 14pts
7 Gladiator (GBR) (Tony Langley, GBR) 7, RDG (7), 14pts
8 Bronenosec (RUS) (Vladimir Liubomirov, RUS) 10,5 15pts
9 Sorcha (GBR) (Peter Harrison, GBR) 9,7 16pts
10 Sled (USA) (Takashi Okura, USA) 6, 12 (DSQ) 18pts
11 Paprec (FRA) (Jean Luc Petithuguenin, FRA) DNC 12, DNC 12 24pts

Quotes:
John Kostecki (USA) tactician Platoon (GER):

“[There were] some really big shifts and if you missed it you were out the back. In that second race, first beat, at times we looked like we were in last place. Sometimes we were in first place. It was quite shifty. We learned in the first race we really needed to attack the shifts and be a little more aggressive. We did that in that second race and it seemed to pay off. The waves made the crew work a challenge. You can definitely get thrown around and get your timing off because of the waves. So you play it a little conservatively at times, at least we did. The last race, it was close. On the final run we were pinned and we couldn’t jibe. Azzurra pinned us out all the way to the layline. Then they jibed away and we all of the sudden got a little header, so we kept going and extended away from them. That seemed to help us a little bit on the final jibe in. We were a minute or so separated [from Azzurra and Provezza] and they had to do an extra jibe and we were able to sail straight through the finish. It was close racing.”

Vasco Vascotto (ITA) tactician Azzurra (ITA):

“I think we still made a couple of small mistakes. They are little, stupid mistakes but in the end they are what cost us a point and the lead. But we have to be happy. In the second race we were better, but still we gybed twenty second too late and so lost the chance to win that race. And so, overall, we have to be happy with two second and a share of the lead with Platoon. But on the other we need to clean up our way of sailing and not lose these kind of points. The level is so high every point is so important. The breeze was oscillating a lot. You work to what you think is the average for the day, still I think the right was generally better, with current and other things. It was exciting and I feel we positioned the boat quite nicely.

I am getting older and so don’t remember too much about different venues. I remember little things but I try to go out each day with a clear mind. I think we have sailed a lot here with the wind and 90 and 100 degrees but not so much 120 which we saw today. I clean all past from my head and just work with what I see and I go on the water with a plan, knowing how I want to sail.”

For full results, visit: http://bit.ly/2miZdMV
To watch the race again, visit http://bit.ly/2e6o3tR.

The 52 SUPER SERIES Miami Royal Cup will take place from 7-11 March. Live commentary and boat tracking via the Virtual Eye is available Tuesday and Wednesday. 52 SUPER SERIES TV powered by Quantum Sails goes live THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY with live action streamed from the race course supported by tracking, commentary and comment from 15-minutes before racing starts each day. All available at www.52SUPERSERIES.com/LIVE and the the app.

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com 

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

 

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com

TP52 Super Series Miami (Photo © Max Ranchi) www.maxranchi.com