The Dodge Brothers on the auction block at Barrett-Jackson Northeast 2018 (Photo © George Bekris )

The Dodge Brothers on the auction block at Barrett-Jackson Northeast 2018 (Photo © George Bekris )

UNCASVILLE, CONN. – June 25, 2018 – Barrett-Jackson, The World’s Greatest Collector Car Auctions®, delivered another incredible record-breaking automotive celebration during its 3rd Annual Northeast Auction, June 20-23, 2018, at Mohegan Sun in Connecticut. During the four-day event, 662 vehicles crossed the block with a 99.25 percent sell through rate, selling for more than $24.9 million, while 457 pieces of automobilia brought in over $832,000. Barrett-Jackson also fueled support for charity by raising $1.245 million from the sale of five vehicles, including the historic sale of Dodge’s last production 2017 Viper and 2018 Challenger SRT Demon for $1 million. In total, Barrett-Jackson set a Northeast Auction sales record, reaching nearly $27 million in total sales.

Bill Goldberg (Photo © George Bekris)

Celebrities, including actor and pro wrestler Bill Goldberg, NBA star Ray Allen, NFL player Barkevious Mingo and comedian Jeff Ross were on-site to join in the high-octane auction action. Barrett-Jackson’s Super Saturday was full of adrenaline-filled fun and included a stop from goldRush Rally as they kicked off their 10th Anniversary Rally, which will stop in 10 cities over 10 days across the United States. The rally is comprised of some of the most passionate auto enthusiasts driving the most spectacular supercars on the planet, and this was the first time in goldRush’s history that the rally stopped at a collector car auction during their epic drives.
Craig Barrett (Photo © George Bekris)

Craig Barrett (Photo © George Bekris)

Last Production Dodge Demon unveiling (Photo © George Bekris)

Last Production Dodge Demon unveiling (Photo © George Bekris)

 

“Once again the energy and passion at our Northeast Auction has been incredible to experience this past week,” said Craig Jackson, chairman and CEO of Barrett-Jackson. “We kicked off the event in a big way on Family Value Day with the historic unveil of the last production 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon (Lot #3002.1) in Mohegan Sun’s spectacular new Expo Center. The next three days continued to ramp up with hundreds of collectible vehicles and automobilia pieces, Ride ’N Drives, Thrill Rides and interactive exhibits. We were honored to be the first collector car auction to host the goldRush Rally, and Saturday was also highlighted by the charity sales of the last production Dodge Viper and last Demon, along with a 35th Anniversary Chevrolet Corvette to help support our yearlong Driven Hearts charity initiative. It was truly an electric weekend and we thank all of our guests for making it such a memorable auction.”
The top 10 vehicles sold during the 2018 Barrett-Jackson Northeast Auction included:
  1. 1967 Chevrolet Nova Custom Coupe “The Innovator” (Lot #687) – $275,000
  2. 1967 Shelby GT500E Super Snake (Lot #667) – $210,000
  3. 2015 Rolls-Royce Ghost (Lot #685) – $203,500 *Record
  4. 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon (Lot #650) – $198,000
  5. 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS454 LS6 (Lot #670) – $172,700
  6. 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird (Lot #671) – $170,500
  7. 1965 Chevrolet Corvette 396/425 Convertible (Lot #680) – $170,500
  8. 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia (Lot #686) – $170,500
  9. 1970 Dodge Charger R/T Custom Coupe (Lot #689) – $156,800
  10. 1960 Chevrolet Corvette 283/250 Convertible (Lot #665.1) – $144,100
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Charity sales took center stage during the Northeast Auction with the sale of five vehicles that raised a total of $1.245 million. Pro wrestler Bill Goldberg was on the block to amp up excitement for the last-production models of the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon (Lot #3002.1) and 2017 Dodge Viper (Lot #3002). The pair crossed the block on Saturday and together hammered in for $1 million to benefit the United Way. The $100,000 buy fee was donated to Barrett-Jackson’s year long Driven Hearts campaign supporting the American Heart Association. On Saturday evening, a ’88 Corvette 35th Anniversary Edition (Lot #3003) sold for $60,000 benefitting the American Heart Association. On Friday, a ’71 Corvette Sting Ray (Lot #3000) sold to benefit The Klingberg Family Centers and a ’70 Chevrolet C10 Pickup (Lot #3001) sold to benefit the American Red Cross.
“It’s rewarding to be a part of the enthusiasm of the automotive community across the Northeast,” said Steve Davis, president of Barrett-Jackson. “We’ve been so blessed to have this community behind us over the last three years, which includes their tremendous support of our charity efforts. With the generous support of our consignors and bidders, we have helped raise nearly $104 million to date for people across the country, from all ages and walks, live healthier and more meaningful lives. We’re so grateful to be a part of the good that comes from helping those in need.”
Automobilia was an integral part of the Barrett-Jackson experience during the 3rd Annual Northeast Auction and set a three-day auction record for total sales, selling 457 pieces that offered something for every type of collector and enthusiast. Automobilia sales soared to over $832,000, with the following top five sales:
  1. Late 1960s US Air Force Promotional Jet Shaped Go-Kart (Lot #8288) – $28,175
  2. 1950s Mobil Oil left-facing porcelain Pegasus neon sign (Lot #8297) – $28,175
  3. Hand-Built 1/3-Scale 1956 Corvette SR Prototype Go-Kart (Lot #8268) – $27,600
  4. 1950s Mobil Oil right-facing porcelain Pegasus neon sign (Lot #8298) – $25,875
  5. 1940s Chrysler-Plymouth single-sided neon porcelain sign (Lot #8294) – $23,000
Barrett-Jackson’s 2018 Las Vegas Auction is September 27-29, 2018, at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. To submit an application to consign at the 2018 Las Vegas Auction, click here. For information on becoming a bidder, go to www.Barrett-Jackson.com/bid. Also, follow Barrett-Jackson on FacebookInstagramLinkedIn and Twitter for the latest news and information heading into the 2018 Las Vegas Auction.
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Leg 3, Cape Town to Melbourne, day 10, on board Turn the Tide on Plastic. Photo by Jeremie Lecaudey/Volvo Ocean Race. 19 December, 2017.

The Volvo Ocean Race Science Programme reached a significant milestone when the race completed a global circumnavigation following its arrival into Cardiff, Wales in May 2018, eight months after departing from Alicante, Spain.

Out of a total of 68 samples taken during the course of the Volvo Ocean Race, only two, collected south of Australia and east of Argentina, have been found to contain no microplastics.

The most recent data, taken from sub-surface seawater samples collected on board Team AkzoNobel and Turn the Tide on Plastic boats, found 75 particles of microplastics per cubic metre in one taken off the US coast following the stopover in Newport, Rhode Island.

Levels of 73 and 76 particles of microplastics per cubic metre were recorded as the boats headed towards the mid-Atlantic. These could be connected to the edge of the North Atlantic garbage patch, one of five ocean ‘gyres’, estimated to be hundreds of kilometres across in size.

In the mid-Atlantic, 63 particles of microplastics per cubic metre were recorded, while close to Cardiff, levels were slightly higher with 65 particles of microplastics per cubic metre found.

Earlier in the race, in the Southern Ocean, close to Point Nemo the furthest point from land on Earth, there were between nine and 26 particles of microplastic per cubic metre. Close to Antarctic waters in the South Indian Ocean levels of microplastics were as high as 25 particles per cubic metre

The highest levels of microplastic found so far, 349 particles per cubic metre were found in a sample taken in the South China Sea that feeds into the Kurushio Current and the North Pacific Gyre. The next highest levels, 307 particles per cubic metre, were found at the point where the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean meet.

The microplastic samples were analysed by members of the Volvo Ocean Race scientific consortium in Kiel, Germany.  The data is then uploaded to a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) microplastics database where scientists are able to access it open source.

Dr. Toste Tanhua of GEOMAR Institute for Ocean Research Kiel, funded by the Cluster of Excellence Future Ocean, carried out the analysis and is presenting the findings at the Volvo Ocean Race Ocean Summit in The Hague, Netherlands on Thursday 28th June.

Dr. Tanhua said: He said: Thanks to the great cooperation of the Volvo Ocean Race and the teams on the water, we have been able to collect a very valuable and unique data set during the race which we have been able to share with the wider scientific community. Unfortunately, almost all the samples contained microplastics, meaning that the plastics are carried with ocean currents to the most remote parts of the world’s oceans.”

The series of seven Ocean Summits have convened key stakeholders at race stopovers where announcements by governments, business and a range of organisations, have resulted in significant steps to help tackle the global ocean plastic crisis.

The latest samples were collected on the 3,300 nautical mile leg from Newport to Cardiff. The boats also collect other oceanographic data measurements including temperature, dissolved CO2, salinity, algae content (as chlorophyll) that gives an indication of levels of ocean health and acidification.

Volvo Ocean Race boats are also collecting data that is essential for forecasting of future weather and climate changes, in both the short and long term. This is already being utilised by the World Meteorological Organisation and UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

 Anne-Cecile Turner, Sustainability Programme Leader for the Volvo Ocean Race, added: “The race has now come full circle and the fact that just two of the samples didn’t contain microplastics clearly shows how pervasive they have become.

“The collation of a complete data set by this elite scientific consortium is of exceptional value and provides an historic legacy and clear benchmark for our future understanding of the world’s oceans and climate.”

Microplastics are often invisible to the naked eye and can take thousands of years to degrade. By collecting information on their levels, the Science Programme is helping scientists gain insight into the scale of plastic pollution and its impact upon marine life.

Microplastics in our ocean preliminary data

The Volvo Ocean Race Sustainability Programme is a partnership in collaboration with Sustainability Partners 11th Hour Racing, the Mirpuri Foundation and our other main partners, Volvo, AkzoNobel, Ocean Family Foundation, Stena Recycling and Bluewater. The Turn the Tide on Plastic boat is, furthermore, supported the by Sky Ocean Rescue.

The Volvo Ocean Race Science Programme is funded by Volvo Cars, who are donating €100 from first 3,000 sales of the new Volvo V90 Cross Country Volvo Ocean Race edition to support the initiative.

Stuart Templar, Director of Sustainability at Volvo Cars, said: “This ground breaking programme has provided invaluable data on the health of our oceans, particularly the global extent of the problem of marine plastic pollution.

“It’s clear that the time for inaction is over, and it’s the responsibility of all of us, including industry, to both make better use of plastic and say no to single use plastic. Volvo Cars is proud to have supported the programme and we would like to thank all those involved, especially The Turn The Tide On Plastic and AkzoNobel crews, as well as the excellent team at GEOMAR.”

At the Ocean Summit in Newport, Volvo Cars stated that they would be removing all single use plastic items from their offices, restaurants and events by the end of 2019. In Gothenburg, they announced that from 2025, at least 25% of the plastic in newly launched Volvos would be made from recycled material.

To further our understanding of the issues connected to plastics the Sustainability Programme is conducting a post race workshop with key global stakeholders from science, academia, the private sector and other institutions to explore the theme: ‘’From micro to nano plastic pollution: the current situation and our knowledge gaps.

UN Environment #CleanSeas campaign, which partners with the Race, aims to encourage governments, businesses and individuals to make changes in their own lives to reduce their plastic footprint.

Grundoon, Jim Grundy, St. David's Lighthouse Trophy; Glenn Family at prize giving Nic Douglass - AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com)

Grundoon, Jim Grundy, St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy; Glenn Family at prize giving Nic Douglass – AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com)

 

The St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy, Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy, and 100-plus more awards were presented to conclude the 2018 Newport Bermuda Race.

(Hamilton, Bermuda, June 24, 2018)—His Excellency, the Governor of Bermuda, John Rankin, hosted the Newport Bermuda Race Prize-Giving on Saturday, welcoming hundreds of guests to the grounds of Government House and assisting with the presentation of more than 100 awards. It was a diverse, multi-generational group of sailors who came forward to receive prizes from the Governor and Jon Corless, commodore of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, and Brad Willauer, commodore of the Cruising Club of America. James Macdonald, the RBYC Honourable Secretary, served as master of ceremonies, presenting the entire nine-page prize list.

Jim Grundy’s Grundoon won the famous St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy for the best corrected time in the largest division of 85 boats. Sailing with one daughter and two sons in the crew, Grundy, of Doylestown, Penn., made off with half a dozen other trophies including the William L. Glenn Family Participation Prize and the Dorade Trophy for vintage yachts over 25 years old. Grundy’s father purchased Grundoon, a Columbia 50, in 1968.

Wizard, a Volvo Ocean 70 owned by the Askew brothers, won the other lighthouse trophy—the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy. Finishing first on corrected time among the highest-performance boats of the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division, the Askews picked up their second major win in six months following a victory at the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race last December. David and Peter Askew are from Sandy, Utah and Riderwood, Md., respectively. There were 22 entries in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division.

Orca, an Island Packet 38 owned by Harold and Mary Guidotti, of Westbrook, Conn., won the Finisterre Division of 40 boats and received the Carleton Mitchell Finisterre Trophy. The trophy is named for the three-time winning skipper and his boat, which coincidentally was also 38 feet long.

More trophy presentation photos (all credits Nic Douglass – AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com) clockwise from top left: Yankee Girl, Zachary Lee, Philip S. Weld Prize; E. Llwyd Ecclestone, Jr., Bermuda Race Roll of Honour; Eric Best, Feo, Cook’s Award; Dreamcatcher, Mudratz team, Stephens Brothers Youth Trophy.Complete results are on the Newport Bermuda Race website where the full prize list will be posted shortly. View the online version of this release.

Trophy presentation photos (all credits Nic Douglass – AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com) clockwise from top left: Grundoon, Jim Grundy, St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy; Grundoon, Jim Grundy and family, William L. Glenn Family Participation Prize; OrcaFinisterre Trophy, Harold Guidotti; Wizard, Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy, Peter Askew.

Yankee Girl won the Philip S. Weld Prize for the best corrected time in the 15-boat Double-Handed Division. Skipper Zachary Lee of Vineyard Haven, Mass., accepted the prize, and his crew Leif Counter, of Pelham, N.Y., received the Moxie Prize, which is awarded in recognition of the other half of the winning double-handed crew.

The Swan 48 Dreamcatcher won the Stephens Brothers Youth Prize for the best performance by a youth division crew, with most of the crew between the ages of 14 and 23. The boat was entered in the race by the Mudratz, a youth-sailing non-profit organization in Eastern Connecticut.

Completing his 23rd Newport Bermuda Race, E. Llwyd Ecclestone, Jr., of West Palm Beach, Fla., was recognized at the Prize-Giving as a new member of the Bermuda Race Roll of Honour. Reflecting on his long-time crew and years of sailing together, Ecclestone offered their three rules of offshore sailing: “Eat well, respect the watch system, and there are no heroes on the boat.”

Eric Best of Feo received the Cook’s Award for perseverance and fortitude in cooking for a racing crew longer than anyone else in the race. Skippered by Best’s daughter, Isabel, the steel Joshua 47 Feo finished in 146 hours, 54 minutes, 17 seconds, a little more than 96 hours after Rambler 88 became the first boat to finish the race.

Dongfeng Race Team (Photo © George Bekris)

Dongfeng Race Team (Photo © George Bekris)

The Chinese-flagged Dongfeng Race Team has won the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18…
Dongfeng Race Team has won the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18 in the closest finish in race history.
Skipper Charles Caudrelier led his team to victory on the final leg of the race, a 970-mile sprint from Gothenburg, Sweden to The Hague.
Incredibly, it marked the first leg win for the team — it couldn’t have come at a better time.

Three teams started Leg 11 of the race on Thursday in a dead heat on the overall leaderboard. The finishing order between MAPFRE, Team Brunel and Dongfeng Race Team at The Hague would determine their place on the overall race podium.

Each of those three teams led at various points on the leg and had their opportunities to grab the prize.

But it was Caudrelier and his crew who made a bold call on Saturday evening to take a coastal route to the finish, which squeezed them tight against the shoreline and separated from the other leaders by a series of Exclusion Zones.

“We were not in such a good position, but we trusted our choice and we pushed,” Caudrelier said. “The others didn’t follow us, but we believed and we won…”

The decision hurt the team in the short term as they tumbled down the leaderboard. But by Sunday morning, with less than 100 miles left to race, weather routing projections had the top boats finishing within minutes of each other. None had been able to break away overnight, despite the significant splits on the race course.

“We knew that we would fall behind initially and that if it came good it would only be at the end. The last position report (1300 UTC on Sunday) we were 27-miles from the finish and they were 20-miles and we thought it was over. But then I did a small weather routing and it showed we could end up one-mile ahead so I woke everyone up and said, ‘let’s push!’”

As the teams finally converged again on Sunday afternoon, just a few miles from the finish, it was Dongfeng Race Team, flying down the coast from the north sliding in front of the offshore group, to earn their first leg win, propelling Caudrelier’s team to overall victory.

“We always trusted each other. Nobody thought we were going to win this last leg, but I had a good feeling,” an emotional Caudrelier said, after thanking his supporters and team. “I said ‘we can’t lose, we can’t lose, we can’t lose’… and we won!”

The overall results make this the closest finish in the 45-year history of the race and marks the first win for a Chinese-flagged team. It also means Carolijn Brouwer and Marie Riou were on board as the first women sailors to win the Volvo Ocean Race.

Xabi Fernández’s MAPFRE was third on the leg, which put the team into second overall.

“It has been tough,” Fernández admitted. “We sailed very well the whole way around the world and on this leg as well, so naturally we’re a bit disappointed. We were very, very close this time, but it was not quite enough. So we have to say congratulations to Dongfeng who sailed a little bit better than us.”

Team Brunel skipper Bouwe Bekking would have liked nothing more than to win the race for the first time in eight tries with a home finish in The Netherlands. But it wasn’t to be. His fourth place leg finish left the team in third place overall.

“Third place, still on the podium, I think we can be pretty proud of that as a team,” he said. “We thought we had made the right choice (to go further offshore) and we expected a windshift. It came 90-minutes too late and that was the race. But that’s yacht racing. And of course we have to congratulate Dongfeng and MAPFRE for their results.”

Second place on the final leg into The Hague was Dutch skipper Simeon Tienpont and his team AkzoNobel, who had previously secured fourth place on the overall leaderboard.

“It’s incredible to finish on the podium in our hometown,” Tienpont said. “We would have loved to have been fighting into The Hague for the final podium but to have set the 24-hour speed record and to get six podium finishes in the race is a testament to the job everyone on our team – on the boat and on shore – have done.”

Vestas 11th Hour Racing had already been locked into fifth place on the scoreboard and after a promising start to Leg 11, had a disappointing seventh place finish on the leg.

“We have a great group of folks on this team,” skipper Charlie Enright said. “We’ve been through a lot and I’m not sure any other group could have dealt with the challenges we have faced the way we did. It’s something special and we’re going to continue to work together moving forward. This was a tough way to go out certainly, but we have one more opportunity with the In-Port Race this weekend.”

That In-Port Race, scheduled for Saturday afternoon, will determine the sixth and seventh place positions in this edition of the Volvo Ocean Race. Both SHK/Scallywag and Turn the Tide on Plastic finished the Volvo Ocean Race on equal points.

The tie-break mechanism is the In-Port Race Series, where David Witt’s Scallywag team currently holds the lead. But Dee Caffari’s Turn the Tide on Plastic is just three points behind and a strong finish on Saturday could lift them off the bottom of the leaderboard.

“We can’t help but smile today. We’ve done it,” said Caffari. “This leg was like the longest In-Port Race ever. A lot of corners to go around, and we gave it 100 per cent and left nothing in the tank.”

For David Witt, the finish was bittersweet the loss of John Fisher overboard in the Southern Ocean top of mind.

“I have very mixed emotions right now,” Witt said dockside immediately after finishing. “I’m incredibly proud of our team both on and off the water. We’re very tight and we have gone through a lot… But I’m also sad of course. I didn’t finish it with my best mate (John Fisher) who we started with. So very mixed emotions, but I’m glad we finished it.”

The teams will celebrate their accomplishments and take well-earned rest on Monday. The rest of the week will see activities in The Hague building towards the final In-Port Race and Awards Night on June 30.

Volvo Ocean Race Leg 11 Final Leaderboard — Saturday 23 June
1. Dongfeng Race Team – 3 days, 3 hours, 22 minutes, 32 seconds
2. team AkzoNobel – 3 days, 3 hours, 38 minutes, 31 seconds
3. MAPFRE – 3 days, 3 hours, 39 minutes, 25 seconds
4. Team Brunel – 3 days, 3 hours, 45 minutes, 52 seconds
5. Turn the Tide on Plastic – 3 days, 3 hours, 56 minutes, 56 seconds
6. SHK / Scallywag – 3 days, 4 hours, 01 minutes, 32 seconds
7. Vestas 11th Hour Racing – 3 days, 4 hours, 05 minutes, 36 seconds

Volvo Ocean Race Overall Points Leaderboard after Leg 11
1. Dongfeng Race Team – 73 points
2. MAPFRE – 70 points
3. Team Brunel – 69 points
4. team AkzoNobel – 59 points
5. Vestas 11th Hour Racing – 39 points
6. SHK / Scallywag – 32 points *
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic – 32 points *

* Should there be a tie on the overall race leaderboard at the end of the offshore legs, the In-Port Race Series standings will be used to break the tie.

With the Mirabaud Bol d’Or now behind them and the Maxi Trimaran ready for competition, the Spindrift Racing Team is back in training mode, and Yann Guichard and his crew have today set off to complete a Transatlantic passage between two world sailing hub – La Trinite’-Sur-Mer in Brittany and Newport, Rhode Island, USA.

The crew of twelve met at Spindrift racing’s base in St Philibert on Friday 15 June and a few hours later, left for their 3000-mile training sail between France and the United States. While the Atlantic is well known to all of the sailors onboard, it provides a great place to train as it offers constantly varied and changing weather situations. In this way the crew will have an excellent opportunity to, once again get back into the rhythm of sailing the world’s largest trimaran as the team prepares for their upcoming Jules Verne Trophy attempt.

The benefits of getting back out on the water and sailing for a longer period are not lost on Yann Guichard: “In sailing, you continue to learn, from the first day through to the last, and the more we sail the better we will get. A transatlantic can be a very effective exercise, and offers much more than single training days in the bay of Quiberon. Sailing these longer passages allows us to set goals for the longer term, to strengthen our teamwork and especially to get some sea miles under our belt.

However, there is a double objective to this crossing. The first is team oriented: “This is not the final crew for the Jules Verne but a transat offers us the opportunity to test new people whose profile can bring something to a world record attempt. I place a lot of importance on team work and my choice of crew, and it is important that any new recruit fits in with the group as a whole. We are sailing with 12 crew, which includes seven sailors that form the core of Spindrift racing and who have been with me almost since the beginning,” commented Yann.

The second objective is “to get as much data and analytics from Spindrift 2 in her new configuration as possible. This year, she has been fitted with her original mast that we shortened and adapted for the 2014 Route du Rhum. As the mast is smaller than our previous one, the team will have to adapt and make some changes in how we sail. So far we have not sailed much with our new rig, so by adapting both technically and physically, we can be as prepared as possible for the challenge that awaits us at the end of the year,” explained the skipper.

With the black and gold team now enroute, it is expected that they will sail south towards the Canaries so as to “find the conditions that are as similar as possible to the reaching conditions that we would find on a World tour,” concluded Yann.

Spindrift 2 is expected to arrive in Newport on about 23 June.

The Rhode Island National Guard Open House Air Show comes to Quonset this weekend. Admission is free, and the gates open at 9 a.m. on Saturday. The flying starts at 11. The Blue Angels are back for this year’s show. Here are all the performers, according to the show’s website.

Rhode Island National Guard Airshow 2017 ( Photo © George Bekris )

Rhode Island National Guard Airshow 2017 ( Photo © George Bekris )

Who’s Flying

USN Blue Angels
USAF F-35 Heritage Flight Team
US Naval Academy Jump Team
Sean D. Tucker
Mike Goulian
Geico Skytypers
Ace Maker Air Shows T-33
Mark Murphy P-51D Mustang Demo
F4U Corsair Demo
TBM Avenger Demo
Shockwave Jet Truck
C-130J Super Hercules

 

Rhode Island National Guard Airshow 2017 ( Photo © George Bekris )

Rhode Island National Guard Airshow 2017 ( Photo © George Bekris )

How To Get There

Once again, the state is offering free train rides to the show. The trains leave from Providence (100 Gaspee St.) North Kingstown (Wickford Junction Station, 1011 Ten Road Road) and T.F. Green Airport (700 Jefferson Blvd,) in Warwick.

By car, parking is free but a $10 donation is encouraged. There is also parking for Recreational Vehicles.

By plane, see the “fly-in” directions on the air show’s website.

Rules

No pets, except for service animals.

No coolers, but food is allowed.

No drones.

No lounge chairs (but lawn chairs, blankets and umbrellas are ok).

Cameras and video cameras are ok.

 

Larry and Jan Pfitzenmaier brought their Cunningham C-4R ( Photo © George Bekris )

Larry and Jan Pfitzenmaier brought their Cunningham C-4R ( Photo © George Bekris )

Greenwich Connecticut was buzzing with activity this weekend with the 2018 Greenwich Concours d’Elegance. The annual event draws attendees from all over the world for a glimpse on some of the rarest of the rare in the automotive industry and is a Northeastern USA must see for many automobile aficionados and collectors.

The 2018 Greenwich Concours d’Elegance Best of Show winners!

© George Bekris

© George Bekris

International Best of Show Sport was the 1957 Ferrari 335 Sport Spider Scaglietti of Scuderia N.E.

 

© George Bekris

© George Bekris

International Best of Show Elegance was the 1935 SS1 Tourer belonging to Colin Seid and Richard Annis.

 

© George Bekris

© George Bekris

American Best of Show Elegance was the 1934 Packard Convertible Victoria of Judge Joseph & Margie Cassini, III.

Saturday was the Concours Americana featuring domestic autos and motorcycles. Warm and sunny skies made a perfect day for the crowds of admirers to enjoy the various vintage auto and motorcycles. Saturday included a ring of American and Foreign modern supercars.

 

 

Sunday was the International Concours with rings full of Jaguars, Ferraris, Bentleys, MG’s, Triumphs and numerous other makes and models. There was something for every taste.

It was a beautiful weekend for a rare gathering of Briggs Cunningham automobiles highlighted at this year’s Greenwich Concours. It was an amazing feat to gather so many of the autos in one place for the show. There were 37 original Briggs Cunningham autos produced. Out of the 37 that were made there are now only 35 survivors. The owners of the 35 survivors were invited by the Greenwich Concours officials and 33 of those attended the event. I don’t think this milestone will be repeated anytime soon. For instance one couple brought their Cunningham C-4R 2,500 miles from Arizona not sure if the weather would cooperate but taking the chance anyway in order to attend this largest gathering of Cunninghams.

There was a variety of different Cunninghams, from convertibles and coupes to Corvettes as well as a 1962 Maserati Tipo 151 straight in from racing at Monaco two weeks ago. Jay Leno entered his 1953 Cunningham C3. It was an amazing sight to seen them lined up along the waterfront gleaming in the sun.

 

 

The 12 metre America’s Cup yacht Columbia, which Briggs Cunningham was winning skipper of in the 1958 America’s Cup, was at the Delamar Hotel docks next to the concours grounds charter guests enjoyed the sailing on the Long Island sound off of Greenwich.

Bonhams returned to Greenwich, CT for its twelfth annual Greenwich Concours d’Elegance Auction on Sunday, June 3rd. Greenwich being less than an hour from New York City drew a large crowd for it’s weekend of premier offerings from barn finds and automobilia to totally restored rare gleaming and historically significant autos. There was also an opportunity to bid on one of two dozen cars from the late Carroll Shelby’s personal collection.

The weekend was a complete success and it’s a wrap until next year. This is an event not to be missed.

( Photo © George Bekris )

( Photo © George Bekris )

Original Cunningham race and street cars, cars of John Fitch, Jaguar SS Cars and Competition Motorcycles to be featured

GREENWICH, Conn.    Recognized as one of the most prestigious classic car shows in the United States, the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance will celebrate its 23rd year of showcasing significant cars, motorcycles and one-off automotive creations on June 1-3, 2018. Production and race cars created in the 1950s by the iconic Briggs Cunningham will headline the entire weekend.

The Concours continues its tradition of holding two unique Concours back-to-back, with American cars and motorcycles on Saturday, and foreign marques on Sunday. The event takes place at Roger Sherman Baldwin Park overlooking the Greenwich, Conn., harbor on Long Island Sound.

Miles Collier, one of America’s premier car collectors, and founder of The Revs Institute, has been named the Grand Marshal for this year’s event. The Revs Institute in Naples, Fla., includes the Collier Collection, with 115 automobiles of special historic and technological importance. Many were acquired from the collection of the late Briggs Cunningham, a family friend. The Institute, which fosters deeper understanding of the transformative role of the automobile, also includes the Revs Digital Library of about 500,000 automotive photographs, with emphasis on racing scenes, and a research library with over 20,000 book titles and complete runs of automotive periodicals in English, French, Italian and German. https://revsinstitute.org

The display of Cunningham cars from around the country is being organized by “Barn Find Hunter” Tom Cotter of Charlotte, N.C., and Cunningham collector and historian Charles Schoendorf, of Rowayton, Conn. Lined up along the waterfront both days will be the 1952 C-4R Le Mans roadster from the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum in Philadelphia, and most of the 25 Vignale-bodied C-3 coupes and cabriolets.

“This will be the most comprehensive collection of Cunningham race cars, touring cars and team cars assembled at one time and place, ever, including at the factory,” says Schoendorf. “A turnout of cars like this will not happen any time soon again, if ever.”

Cunningham, who died in 2003 at the age of 96, is best known as an America’s Cup skipper, race-car builder, driver and team owner. He made the Greens Farms section of Westport, Conn., his home from the ’20s through the ’60s. He fielded his early race cars for Sam and Cowles “Miles” Collier out of his carriage house, and later kept his car collection there before moving it out of state. The Cunningham family remained at the Greens Farms compound until the death of his daughter Lucie Cunningham McKinney in 2014.

On Saturday, cars from one of Cunningham’s most notable race-car drivers, the late John Fitch, of Lime Rock, Conn., will also be on display. A highly-respected driver of the ’50s and ’60s, Fitch was also a safety pioneer and a World War II fighter pilot. The 1966 Fitch Phoenix, owned by Charles Mallory, of Greenwich, Conn., will be part of the display, along with the 1952 Fitch-Whitmore Le Mans Special.

Sunday’s Concours will host a special display of Jaguars, with a focus on the rare pre-war SS Cars. The SS 100, SS 90, SS 1 Tourer and SS 1 Coupe are all scheduled to be shown.

The weekend will also feature the presentation of A Century of Competition Motorcycles by American Iron Magazine publisher Buzz Kanter, of New Canaan, Conn., which will showcase race bikes of various styles from the early 1900s to the present. “I’ve heard motorcycle racing started when the first motorcycle rider came across another on the road. And it’s been full throttle ever since,” Kanter says.

“This year’s Concours promises to be one of the best displays of cars and motorcycles ever,” says Concours Chairman Mary Wennerstrom. “We have collectors coming from all over North America, including Canada, nearly half of the 50 states and, of course, Connecticut. It is very exciting to have so many people in the collector car world gathering in Greenwich! And we are honored to have Miles Collier serve as our Grand Marshal.”

The beneficiary of the Greenwich Concours for the 23rd year is Americares, a health-focused relief and development organization that responds to people affected by poverty or disaster with life-changing health programs, medicine and medical supplies. The Stamford, Conn.-based organization is the world’s leading nonprofit provider of donated medicine and medical supplies.

VIP tickets are available on a limited basis. VIP Tickets include early entry at 8 a.m., breakfast and lunch with the car collectors and judges, entrance to the Bonhams cocktail party on Friday night, poster, lapel pin, program and VIP lanyard.

• Gates open at 10 a.m. for general admission, 8 a.m. for VIP ticket holders

• Advance tickets for both days are available at $30 per day or $50 for both days

  • Tickets purchased on the day of the event are $40 per day or $60 for both days• Children 12 and under are free when accompanied by an adult• VIP Admission is $150 per day or $250 for both days• SaturdayNight Gala tickets are available for $175• Tickets can be purchased at http://www.greenwichconcours.com/visitors/tickets/