© Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race

Alicante stopover. Start. Photo by Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race.

Simeon Tienpont will skipper team AkzoNobel in Leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean Race from Alicante to Lisbon on Sunday, after Race Management approved a new crew list submitted by the team shortly before the dockout.

October 22, 201710:35 UTC

A total of eight sailors will be on board for the 1,450 nautical mile leg to Lisbon – including Dutchman Tienpont.

That crew composition satisfies requirements for safety, gender and age as per the Notice of Race.

The new crew list is as follows:

Simeon Tienpont – skipper
Brad Farrand
António Fontes
Martine Grael
Luke Molloy
Ross Monson
Emily Nagel
Nicolai Sehested

The team has been in flux since it was announced that original skipper Simeon Tienpont had left the team and was replaced by watch captain Brad Jackson last weekend.

On Friday evening, Tienpont won an arbitration judgement allowing him to return to the team and just hours before start time, the team submitted an updated crew list with Tienpont leading a newly constituted squad.

In a statement released by the team, Tienpont commented: “This has obviously been an incredibly difficult time for everyone involved since we arrived here in Alicante just 10 days ago. I have now reached an agreement with AkzoNobel and all parties now want to put this behind us and focus on our campaign for the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18.

“I would like to thank Brad Jackson for stepping up at such a challenging time to keep team AkzoNobel moving forward with our preparations for the race. Thanks also go to Joca Signorini and Jules Salter for their contributions to the campaign so far and also to Rome Kirby. We are grateful to Sun Hung Kai Scallywag team owner Seng Huang Lee and skipper David Witt for loaning us Antonio Fontes for this first leg.

“Personally, I am relieved to be back with my team and excited to be getting our Volvo Ocean Race campaign underway.”

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

The local heroes on Xabi Fernàndez’s MAPFRE were a popular winner in the first point scoring race of the Volvo Ocean Race.

The local heroes on Xabi Fernández’s MAPFRE were a popular winner in the first point scoring race of the Volvo Ocean Race.

Fernández and his team made a bold call at the start to duck behind the entire fleet in order to sail up what turned out to be the favoured right hand side of the course, coming from behind to earn a narrow lead at the first gate.

“It was pretty clear from Joan (Vila) and Rob (Greenhalgh) that we wanted to hit the right side of the course in the first upwind looking for more breeze,” explained Fernández.

“Our intention was to start on port but Pablo (Arrarte) saw the gap himself when Brunel did a poor tack and they couldn’t accelerate so we want for the cross and we had plenty of room and once we hit the right everything went well.”

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

MAPFRE then managed to stretch out to a lead of nearly one-minute at the bottom gate, giving them a lead they would enjoy the rest of the way.

“The truth is it hasn’t been an easy race but we took a bit of a risk at the start,” Fernández said after the finish. “We saw the gap in front of Brunel and we went for it. Everything went really well.”

Watch the highlight video here

In fact, the Spanish team sailed a flawless race, in terms of strategy and execution, and were never threatened after grabbing the lead at the first mark.

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

But behind them, it was a hard-fought race. Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag was strong on the first leg, but dropped back over the course of the race. In contrast, Dongfeng Race Team fought up the fleet to grab second place, battling with Vestas 11th Hour Racing and Team Brunel who were trading places throughout the race.

“There was a lot of action! MAPFRE played their own game alone but behind them, we had a big fight for second place. It’s good, it’s good,” said skipper Charles Caudrelier on Dongfeng Race Team.

“We showed how we can sail well, after having not such good results in the last few days. It’s great that we managed to come back and get this result.”

“It was a very exciting first In-Port Race for us,” said Charlie Enright, the skipper of Vestas 11th Hour Racing. “They’re always really close. You know, when you’re racing these 65-foot canting keel boats around a one-mile track it gets interesting, with a lot of exchanges and big headsails and a lot of grinding. We did some good things and some bad things and got third place. All in all, not a bad way to start the campaign.”

“I had a bad start and that put us on the back foot,” said Bouwe Bekking the skipper of Team Brunel. “But we sailed the boat very nicely. All in all, we’re pretty happy with how we sailed today.”

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race.

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race.

Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag made a late gain to grab fifth over team AkzoNobel with Turn the Tide on Plastic never recovering from a poor first leg.

“It was okay. Fifth’s not great but it was okay. We were second at the top but we just made one mistake on the first run and it cost us. Basically, it was good. Amazing to be racing here in Alicante,” said David Witt, the skipper of Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag.

MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante — Results

Position Team Elapsed Time Points
1 MAPFRE 54:38 7
2 Dongfeng Race Team 56:06 6
3 Vestas 11th Hour Racing 56:54 5
4 Team Brunel 57:13 4
5 Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag 58:07 3
6 team AkzoNobel 58:31 2
7 Turn the Tide on Plastic 59:39 1
Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

Alicante stopover. MAPFRE In-Port Race Alicante. Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race. 14 October, 2017.

Action aboard Victory ’83 at last year’s 12 Metre North American Championship. (Photo © Richard Schultz)

Action aboard Victory ’83 at last year’s 12 Metre North American Championship. (Photo © Richard Schultz)

 

Season’s Grand Finale for the Americas Fleet Starts Sept. 22

NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND (September 16, 2017) – Ten historic 12 Metres are sailing their North American Championship off Newport, R.I. over Sept. 22 -24 and promising a spectacular finish to their 2017 sailing season. The event, along with the METREFEST Newport, Newport Trophy and Edgartown Race held earlier this summer, counts toward points collected in the ROAD TO THE WORLDS Waypoint Series that leads to the next 12 Metre Worlds, scheduled for Newport in 2019.

“The game’s afoot,” said Event Chair Peter Gerard who also is Vice President of the Americas Fleet and spearheads the ROAD TO THE WORLDS program. “Everyone is ramping up for the Worlds, and it’s very exciting that we have several new revitalized and/or completely restored boats joining the Americas Fleet and adding depth to the competition as well as the rich history of the 12mR class.”

Ranging in length between 65 and 75 feet, the Twelves – as they are fondly called – are best known as the America’s Cup yachts sailed during the “Golden Era” of that event, which filled the years between 1958 and 1987. Since the America’s Cup was held in Newport from 1930 to 1983 and many of the Twelves now call Newport their home, these yachts are dear to the hearts of locals as well as sailing aficionados worldwide, remembered for their intriguing designs, keenly competitive teams and famous skippers, which included Americans Ted Turner and Dennis Conner.

This year’s North American Championship fleet will be hosted by Ida Lewis Yacht Club and docked, just like back in the day, at Bannister’s Wharf for viewing while not racing. The teams of 14 to 16 will compete in three divisions – Grand Prix, Modern and Traditional – from Friday through Sunday, and courses are planned for Rhode Island Sound and upper Narragansett Bay.

With course signals at 1055 each morning of racing, landlubbers who go to Bannister’s Wharf between 0900-1030 will have the best chance of seeing the 12s “docking out.”

Re-introduced to the sailing scene earlier this year, Defender (US-33), Challenge XII (KA-10), and Freedom (US-30) will bring the count of Twelves sailing in the Modern Division at the North Americans to five. The division is rounded out by longstanding favorites Courageous (US-26) and Intrepid (US-22). Sailing for North American bragging rights in the Traditional division will beColumbia (US-16), Weatherly (US-17) and American Eagle (US-21), while in the Grand Prix division, defending champion New Zealand (KZ-3) will spar with Laura (KZ-5).

International 12 Metre Association 2017 Newport Trophy Regatta  earlier this year. (Photo © Stephen Cloutier)

International 12 Metre Association 2017 Newport Trophy Regatta  earlier this year. (Photo © Stephen Cloutier)

At an Awards Ceremony on Sunday afternoon at Ida Lewis Yacht Club, the Gubelmann Trophy will be awarded to the three division winners, while the Ted Hood Trophy will be awarded to the 12 Metre teams in each division with the highest points overall for the season.

Courageous is currently the top Americas Fleet contender in the Waypoint Series standings. Gerard expects 25 boats – more than half coming from outside North America – will compete in the 2019 12 Metre World Championship.

For more information, visit http://www.12mrclass.com/ or contact Peter Gerard at pgerard53@gmail.com, +1 214-244-4955.

Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/12mR.Class

Modern Fleet Strengthened with New Players

“With the addition of DefenderChallenge XII and Freedom to the Moderns, you can expect that division to be ultra-competitive,” said Gerard. “And next year when we have two additional Moderns on the line, as we’re expecting, it will be even more competitive.”

Freedom, designed by Olin Stephens and the last yacht to successfully defend the America’s Cup for the New York Yacht Club by defeating Australia in 1980, was completely overhauled by Charles Robertson (Guilford, Conn.). Freshly outfitted with new sails and a new crew, she made her debut at METREFEST Newport. Challenge XII, designed by Ben Lexcen for the 1983 America’s Cup, has been turning heads with her new refit and jet-black hull and sails. Her owner/driver, Jack LeFort (Jamestown, R.I.), proved his is the team to beat when he turned in a commanding victory at the Newport Trophy.

Defender, which was designed by Pedrick Yacht Designs and sailed in the Defender Trials for the 1983 America’s Cup, was this season’s early leader after having been saved from the scrap heap in 2010 and restored to racing form by Dennis Williams (Hobe Sound, Fla./Newport, R.I.). It was a tough decision for Williams to campaign Defender and bench his Victory ’83, which was the current 12mR class fleet, North American and World champion, but the long-game goal was to increase the size of the local fleet.

“We’re only guardians of these boats,” said Williams, who also owns a third 12 Metre, USA (US-49), which he hopes to also see racing again by the 2019 Worlds. “We leave them better than we found them and pass them along to others who we hope will do the same and continue to propagate the fleet.”

 

(end)
(Full Entry List Follows)

Grand Prix Division
KZ-5 Laura, Kip Curren, Newport, R.I.
KZ-3 New Zealand, Gunther Buerman, Highland Beach, Fla./Newport, R.I.

Modern Division
US-26 Courageous, Ralph Isham/Steve Glaskock/Alexander Auersperg/Ward Marsh, Newport, R.I.
US-22 Intrepid, Jack Curtin, New York, N.Y.
KA-10 Challenge 12, Jack LeFort, Jamestown, R.I.
US-33 Defender, Dennis Williams, Hobe Sound, Fla./Newport, R.I.
US-30 Freedom, Charles Robertson, Guilford, Conn.

Traditional Division
US-16 Columbia, Kevin Hagerty, Boston, Mass.
US-17 Weatherly, Jay Schakny, E. Greenwich, R.I.
US-21 American Eagle, Bob Morton/Cindy DeLotto, Newport, R.I./Edgartown, Mass.

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Cala Galera, Italy (Aug. 24, 2017) – The 2017 MELGES 32 BOERO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP hosted by CIRCOLO NAUTICO E DELLA VELA ARGENTARIOcame to life today, adding three more fierce races to the scoreboard under slightly breezy conditions.

Standing firm at the top once again is Russia’s Pavel Kuznetsov at the helm of TAVATUY (Evgeny Neugodnikov, tactician). His big risks, apparent aggressiveness and very few tactical mistakes paid off big as he further extended his lead by a couple of points.

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Just behind are some of his biggest adversaries, including Edoardo Lupi and Massimo Pessina (Lorenzo Bressani, tactician) sailing TORPYONE. Their 6-2-1 daily score is a vast improvement over yesterday’s 7-8, moving them up to second place.

Giangiacomo Serena di Lapigio’s G.SPOT (Branko Brcin, tactician) experienced a mediocre day on the race course. In particular, a scoring set-back in Race Four dropped them into third.

In contrast, Race Four was a banner heat for Melges 32 Class stalwart Edoardo Pavesio’s FRA MARTINA (Manuel Weiller Vidal, tactician) as he earned a valuable bullet, enabling him to remain in fourth.

Matteo Balestrero proved that patience and small steps can mean big movement. Thanks to a subtle 3-9-3 scoreline, he and his GIOGI team have now emerged into the top five.

Notable kudos go out to Vincenzo Onorato’s MASCALZONE LATINO (Cameron Appleton, tactician) for a nice, well-deserved win in Race Three.

The Corinthian division standings remain very close with little change from Day One. The all Italian teams of Martin Reintjes’ CAIPIRINHA (Enrico Fonda, tactician) and Francesco Graziani’s VITAMINA (Andrea Fornaro, tactician) are still first and second respectively.

Tomorrow will mark the third day of competition and for some, it will be the last opportunity to ‘move up’ as with the completion of Race Six, each team will discard their worst performance.

The first warning on Friday will be 13.00 (Italy).

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

The Melges 32 World Championship presented by Boero Yacht Coatings is proudly supported by Helly Hansen, Toremar, North Sails, Garmin Marine Italia, Lavazza and Barracuda Communication.

MEDIA AND RACING COVERAGE
As with all Melges 32 events around the world, racing updates will be posted online at the OFFICIAL MELGES 32 FACEBOOK PAGE. Tune in for the latest racing information, results, video interviews, and photos. Race reports, press releases and photos will be available online each day post-racing at MELGES32.COM.

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

TOP FIVE RESULTS (PRELIMINARY – After Five Races)
1.) Pavel Kuznetsov/Evgeny Neugodnikov, TAVATUY; 1-1-2-5-10 = 19
2.) Edoardo Lupi-Massimo Pessina/Lorenzo Bressani, TORPYONE; 7-8-6-2-1 = 24
3.) Giangiacomo Serena di Lapigio/Branko Brcin, G.SPOT; 2-3-4-14-2 = 25
4.) Edoardo Pavesio/Manuel Weiller Vidal, FRA MARTINA; 3-7-8-1-7 = 26
5.) Matteo Balestrero/Daniele Cassinari, GIOGI; 12-6-3-9-3 = 33
VIEW FULL 2017 MELGES 32 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP RESULTS
OFFICIAL YACHTSCORING EVENT WEBSITE

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

TOP FIVE RESULTS (2017 Melges 32 World League, Four Events Completed)
1.) Giangiacomo Serena di Lapigio, G.SPOT = 72 pts.
2.) Edoardo Lupi/Massimo Pessina, TORPYONE = 68 pts.
3.) Andrea Lacorte, VITAMINA AMERIKANA = 65 pts.
4.) Matteo Balestrero, GIOGI = 63 pts.
5.) Pavel Kuznetsov, TAVATUY; 60 pts.

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)

Melges 32 Worlds (Photo by Max Ranchi)


FULL MELGES 32 WORLD LEAGUE RESULTS

PHOTO GALLERY – BARRACUDA COMMUNICATIONS

MELGES 32 ON FACEBOOK
MELGES 32 ON TWITTER
MELGES 32 ON INSTAGRAM
MELGES 32 ON YOUTUBE

Hanuman © George Bekris

After winning Tuesday’s 20 nautical miles opening race, Hanuman paired an initial fourth place to victory in the second of the two windward-leeward races today. They open up their leading margin at the J Class World Championship in Newport RI to three points ahead of the consistent Lionheart which has scored now three third places.

Although Hanuman lead across the finish line at the conclusion of a thrillingly tight first windward-leeward of the day, so closely were the chasing pack snapping at their heels that they dropped to fourth on corrected time. Topaz won their first race ever when they held off Velsheda by just seven seconds, while Lionheart’s margin for third over Hanuman was just two seconds.

There was not as much doubt in the second contest. After breaking clear of Velsheda which were overlapped with them at the first windward mark they gradually eked out their lead to finish one minute and 17 seconds ahead of the championship’s sole ‘original’ J Class.

The SW breeze came in on cue at between nine and 14kts, the second race starting at 1535hrs was the windier of the two. There were more than enough shifts in wind direction and pressure to keep the contests tight and even. Topaz battled back from sixth at the top mark in the first race to make a wholesale gain on the right, west side of the second upwind leg, tailgating Hanuman around the final turn, a gain orchestrated by local Newport ace Tony Rey in concert with tactician Ross McDonald.

While Hanuman carried on to the right after a conventional bear away, a nicely executed gybe set cashed in Topaz’s gain against a frustrating small error by Hanuman. But the hugely experienced Hanuman team, lead by skipper-helm Kenny Read, sailed smart and clean for their victory in the second race.

“There was a moment I think in the second race after the top mark where Jim and Kirsty Clark and myself all caught each others’ eyes and all three of us at the same time exhaled loudly at the same time, like, ‘Phew this is close!’ Such great sailboat racing.” Said Read on dock at the Newport Shipyard.

The opening upwind legs were gripping, no one side or the other paying an obvious dividend. Hanuman won out from the game of patience played between the four boats on the middle left of the first beat in the first race. But after having had to tack away to the right from a slowed, understandably cautious start at the signal boat, it was Velsheda which lead Hanuman around the first mark but then lost out to Hanuman and to Lionheart at the bottom of the run. Topaz’s comeback on the second beat was the foundation of their win, but it was the kite set which made the difference.

“The real key move was our hoist at the top mark which prevented Hanuman from gybing. To get the first win for the boat at these world championship is great for the while team and for the owner.” Peter Holmberg, helmsman of Topaz, said. Since being launched in 2015, Topaz has only raced at the Saint Barth’s Bucket regatta in the Caribbean twice, in 2016 and this year, before competing at both the Bermuda J Class events in June.

In fact Topaz lead the world championship after Race 2 but blotted their copybook when they had to take an expensive penalty on the first beat of the next race for tacking in front of Lionheart, going on to finish sixth, “One of my plans for this regatta was to avoid the stupid things, the big results. I don’t get to look much because these boats are so hard to steer I am just driving, so I did not really see what was happening until it was too late.”

Hanuman’s crew work was slick, pushing their sail handling technology to the maximum. Hanuman in particular successfully run with a furling headsail and with a dousing sock on their massive spinnakers.

Read comments: “The sock has bailed us out of a couple of tight spots. There is a fine line between the helmsman getting a little too greedy and reality. Listen it is give or take with a few metres at some marks between whether you are first or fourth. It all helps. A lot of the boats that are successful in this class have had their same crew for years and these guys do such a great job. We put them in ridiculously bad spots sometimes and they pull it off time and again. That is on the crew.”

He concludes, “This full on. Whoever would have thought that boats like these would be going like this at these speeds. You have to put a lot of trust in everybody. We have 25 crew and every person has a very specific job and if one person does not do their job this thing can fall apart in two seconds.”

In this fleet Hanuman’s three point lead is nothing, winners of the America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta and the America’s Cup J Class Regatta Lionheart are poised in second and Velsheda lie third, having been second and first at the first turn of today’s races.

For Thursday, the third racing day of the first ever J Class World Championship, the forecast is for lighter airs before the breezes are set to strengthen once more for Friday and Saturday.

RESULTS

Also on the dock at the Newport Shipyard is JH2 Rainbow

The International Maxi Association (IMA)
The International Maxi Association (IMA) represents the owners of Maxi yachts from all over the world. Recognised in 2010 as the World Sailing international class of Maxi yachts, the IMA is uniquely entitled to organise official sanctioned World championships for Maxi yachts. The IMA now has 70 members from all over the world, and more than a dozen honorary members including Gianfranco Alberini, who for more than 30 years was Secretary General of the Association up until his death in June 2013. The current President of the IMA is Thomas Bscher, owner of the Wally 107 Open Season, while Secretary General is Andrew McIrvine, also Admiral of the Royal Ocean Racing Club.

The IMA is registered in Geneva, has a base in Porto Cervo and an office in the UK, for rating and technical matters. With two affiliated classes (Maxi 72s, and, since 2017, the J Class) and one associated class (Wally Class), the IMA intends to “guide and structure maxi yacht racing. The IMA rule defines and categorises maxi yachts: it aims to embrace all maxi yachts and as such follows, instigates and encourages developments that are deemed to have a positive effect on the construction and racing of maxi-sized boats.” (www.internationalmaxiassociation.com)

PRINCIPAL PARTNER:

Cloudy Bay Vineyards
Cloudy Bay was established in 1985 by David Hohnen, a pioneer and visionary, who was convinced of New Zealand wines’ great potential. The winery was among the first five to be established in Marlborough, the country’s finest wine region, and is now highly regarded for the superlative quality and consistency of its wines. Thirty years later, Cloudy Bay remains New Zealand’s most recognized winery. Sauvignon blanc is the estate’s flagship grape variety. Cloudy Bay also produces a Chardonnay, a Pinot Noir and a delicately sparkling wine, Pelorus. Cloudy Bay belongs to the LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton group. For more information, log on www.cloudybay.co.nz/

PARTNERS:

North Sails Group
North Sails, the largest division of North Technology Group, is the world leader in sailmaking technology. North Sails holds the patent for 3Di, a unique composite construction process that produces high-performance sails that approach the shape holding of a rigid foil. North Sails is the sailmaker of choice on the majority of America’s Cup, Grand Prix, ocean race boats and Superyachts. North Sails offers a wide range of performance 3D and paneled sails for cruising sailors and is the world’s leading sailmaker for one-design classes with more National, World and Olympic Class victories than all other sailmakers combined.

Peters & May Global Boat Transport: 
Peters & May Global Boat Transport, part of the Peters & May Group, ships over 4,000 yachts and motorboats of all weights and dimensions annually for private individuals and manufacturers. The company has its own specialist boat loaders and surveyors, custom shipping cradles, lifting equipment and has developed close working relationships with ship owners for optimum vessel safety and security. Peters & May has provided bespoke logistics solutions by sea, road, rail and air since 1973. A preferred supplier to many manufacturers, Peters & May supports organisations, individuals and leisure clients with an added value, bespoke and reliable ISO 9001 accredited logistics and consultancy solution. With wholly owned offices in the UK, USA, France, Spain, Hong Kong, China, Italy, and Germany and partnership arrangements in Turkey, Australia, Dubai, South Africa, New Zealand, South America, Belgium and Russia, the company’s reach and capabilities are truly global. Peters & May takes pride in exceeding client expectations with its attention to detail and a personal service that only an independent can deliver. For more information visit http://www.petersandmay.com/services/global-boat-transport

Zorab Insurance Services
For over 25 years the team at ZIS have provided their insurance expertise to the marine, property and corporate sectors, for some of the most discerning clients in the world. ZIS have an international reach and combining their own experience with unmatched technical knowledge, their dedication and level of service to each specialized sector is unparalleled. ZIS have a long-standing history in insurance and a unique enthusiasm for their work. ZIS are immensely proud to be a partner of the J Class Association. The Association is essential for safeguarding this iconic part of sailing history. The sight of the J Class yachts on the water is an inspiring spectacle that transcends generations. ZIS not only support the aims of the association, but share the passion for sailing and commitment to the preservation of the J Class tradition. For more information visit http://zis.co.uk/

 

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Tilly XV @ George Bekris

The 38th Annual Panerai Newport Classic Yacht Regatta returns August 26thand 27th to celebrate classic yachts, both power and sail. Immediately following the Panerai Herreshoff Classic Yacht Regatta on Friday, August 25th, the Panerai Newport Classic Yacht Regatta will include a race from Bristol to Newport on Saturday, August 26th, along with racing on lower Narragansett Bay on Sunday, August 27th. The two events combined offer three days of back-to-back racing that will be known as the Narragansett Bay Classic Yacht Rendezvous.

Newly added for this year is a race from Bristol to Newport on Saturday, August 26th, which will include a collection of classic motor yachts rallying from Bristol to Newport. All will congregate at the Alofsin Piers at Sail Newport/Fort Adams State Park after racing. On Sunday, the Classic Yacht Parade through Newport Harbor will be followed by racing on lower Narragansett Bay in the final event of the Panerai Classic Yacht Series.


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

Thursday, August 24

1700-1900: Early check-in for PHCYR and PNCYR at Herreshoff Marine Museum, Bristol

Friday, August 25

0800-1000: Check-in for PHCYR and PNCYR at Herreshoff Marine Museum, Bristol
1700-1830: Check-in at Herreshoff Marine Museum, Bristol

Saturday, August 26

0830-0930: Check-in at Herreshoff Marine Museum, Bristol
0930: Mandatory Skippers’ Meeting
1155: First Warning Signal – Bristol to Newport Race
1800: Cocktail Party at IYRS, Newport

Sunday, August 27

1030: Classic Yacht Parade
1155: First Warning Signal
1800: Cocktails
1930: Awards Dinner at IYRS, Newport


About the PNCYR:

Founded in 1980 by a group of Newport-based classic yacht owners and fans who wanted to preserve and promote the culture of classic yachting, the Panerai Newport Classic Yacht Regatta (PNCYR) brings together yachts designed and built by some of the greatest American masters. Through the years, these wonderful vessels have been maintained by equally passionate and talented professionals and yacht owners. The PNCYR is the final stage of the North American Circuit of the Panerai Classic Yachts Challenge. Winners of the Panerai series are awarded at the ceremony on Sunday evening, August 27.

Hanuman Day 1 Winner (Photo © George Bekris)

 

Hanuman, skippered and steered by local ace Ken Read with his brother Brad among the afterguard, stole the show on a spectacular opening day of the first ever J Class World Championship on the waters of Newport, Rhode Island where J Class yachts made their America’s Cup debut way back in 1930 and where the Reads cut their teeth in competitive sailing.

Hanuman lead from the first mark around a 20 nautical miles ‘Navigators Course’. When challenged by the newest J Class yacht in the fleet Svea, which is guided by wily America’s Cup Stars & Stripes veterans Peter Isler and Tom Whidden, Hanuman fought back downwind with smooth, well executed manoeuvres. When they took their well earned winning gun, Hanuman were extending into the mist, stepping clear of a spirited scrap over places second to sixth,

“That was one of the very coolest sailboat races I have ever been in my entire life.” Newport born and bred Ken Read enthused, “Honestly, it had everything. Home town. Gybing and tacking around all the little nooks and crannies, such a great crowd of boats out there watching. That is what we always hoped this regatta would show, how special this can be. And I am sure it did just that.”

“It was fun and special having my brother Brad on board. This whole team has been working for this for years and also to see the smile on Jim and Kristy’s faces today. It was just great.”

The opening race of the inaugural J Class World Championship delivered it all, spectacle, majesty, close competition over a decent length course and just enough drama. The New York Yacht Club race team took full advantage of the forecast for a building, pre frontal breezes to sail a spectacular, tight coastal course up and back under the Newport-Jamestown bridge, checking off in turn historical local landmarks made famous over the dozen editions of the America’s Cup raced here, entrancing the huge spectator fleet and treating the viewers who crowded the headlands and car parks that fringed the course to the close, spectacular competition they turned out for.

The fleet of six J Class yachts revelled in the perfect flat water and brisk 14-18kt SW’ly breezes. Places were traded back and forth throughout the fleet from first mark to the last. The sun split through the hazy cloud cover at key moments. Ranger shut out Velsheda at the windward end of the start line and with nowhere to go Velsheda clipped the signal boat. Harrying Hanuman around the first top mark Svea – in just their fifth ever J Class race – split their kite on a botched hoist, forcing them to make their first ever in line spinnaker peel. Double winners in Bermuda Lionheart came from behind on the beat to the finish, holding west of Gould Island, enjoying a huge starboard tack lift which got them back up to a useful third. There were even a pod of dolphins out to play around the bows of Ranger and Topaz early on the first 3.5 nautical miles beat.

The 20 nautical miles course was essentially a short upwind to a laid mark followed by a long run north against the ebb, funnelled spectacularly under the centre span of the bridge. Their choice of the Castle Hill, right side of the run looking downwind, prompted in part by their kite problems, yielded a useful dividend in tidal relief for Svea and they were all but leading as they passed Fort Adams, until Hanuman again eased away at the next gybe.

“The boat was going well.” Read confirmed, “We got out a bit of a jam off the start line. Being able to hang off Lionheart was key to start. Lionheart has been a very high pointing boat for a while. Being able to hang there until almost to layline was critical for us. And then once we got clear air we let the boat do its thing. It is a bit like a horse race, you let the horse do its thing. We picked the right jib, on the number two, a couple of the boats had bigger jibs and I think that the trimmers did a spectacular job, the communication was good. It was just fun.”

Asked if there was any local knowledge contributing to their win, Read said,
“Actually no, we nearly lost out to Svea on the right of the run. But actually we talked about it, Brad said ‘if we were by ourselves that is what we’d do, but we were not. But it is the first race of the world championship and everybody gybed away and so ‘don’t be an idiot’ we stayed with the pack. Svea made a six boat length gain but we picked the right kite (symmetrical), we gained a length or so on every gybe against the asymmetrics and on the last beat we just sailed smart.”

For the Svea team which only put their rig back in the boat just over a week ago after having their Bermuda J Class America’s Cup halted by a forestay problem after just two races, second place today was a welcome reward. The newest, biggest J ever shows great speed but they are still early on the learning curve when it comes to smooth, effective manoeuvres compared to the teams polished by more than five years of J Class racing.

Svea’s tactician and project manager Charlie Ogletree commented, “We are happy to get a second and start the series with a good result, a ‘keeper’ and we learned a lot today. That was our first spinnaker peel in anger after tearing our kite on the set. We took so long to get the peel done we were committed, we had discussed it but the boat handling pushed us in that direction.”

“There was less current down that side, staying close to Castle Rock, we had good local knowledge, some good navigating from Peter Isler. We changed our tactics towards the end to consolidate against Lionheart. Downwind we are quick and upwind we are still learning our modes.”

After being bounced around downwind Lionheart made the most of their recovery up the beat and were pressing Svea hard to the line losing out by just five seconds on corrected time. Tactician Bouwe Bekking, who has two of his Team Brunel Volvo crew on board Lionheart – and one from rivals MAPFRE – recalled, “It was a good day. We had a good start and squeezed off Hanuman and were in a good position when the breeze went too far to the left, the guys underneath us laid and we overstood and that is expensive in these boats. You crack the sheets and only go one or two tenths of a knot quicker.”

J Class World Championship
Race 1
1 Hanuman 2h 8m 13s
2 Svea 2h 10m 15s
3 Lionheart 2h 10m 20s
4 Topaz 2h 11m 37s
5 Ranger 2h 12m 4s
6 Velsheda 2h 10m 17s

 

#jclassworlds #jclass #jclassyachts #jk6hanuman #jh1lionheart #j5ranger #js1svea #j8topaz #jk7velsheda #hanuman #lionheart #ranger #svea #topaz #velsheda #yacht #yachts #sail #racing #sailing #sailboat #instasailing #yachtingphotography #sailingphotography #superyacht #newportri #nyyc #newportshipyard

Fastnet 2017 Start ( Photo © Barry James Wilson )

Sunday 6 August 2017

The Solent laid on ‘classic’ conditions for the start of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s 47th Rolex Fastnet Race. In brilliant sunshine and with brisk westerly winds gusting up to 20 knots, the giant fleet tacked up the western Solent before compressing through the usual bottleneck at Hurst Narrows. A record-sized fleet of 368 boats started the race, 12 more than two years ago, confirming the Rolex Fastnet Race’s position as the world’s largest offshore yacht race.

(Photo © Barry James Wilson)

(Photo © Barry James Wilson)

 

The first start got underway at 11:00 BST for the nine multihulls and within minutes, the blue three-hulled streak that is Concise 10 had pulled out a lead, frequently heeling to an alarming degree, just one hull immersed.

 

By the time IRC One was starting at 12:20 Tony Lawson’s MOD 70, skippered by Ned Collier Wakefield, was already off Poole. Crewman Paul Larsen, who five years ago became the world’s fastest sailor setting a world record of 65.45 knots, reported Concise 10 was sailing under reefed mainsail and staysail. “We’re making 20 knots tacking past Poole and just dropping into the watch system. Glamour start conditions in the Solent. I can just see the next boats clearing Hurst Castle.” However Larsen warned that unless the wind freed up, there was little chance for them to break the multihull race record. By 1500 Concise 10 was already level with Portland Bill.

The multihulls were followed away from Cowes by two other ‘non-IRC’ classes – the nine doublehanded IMOCA 60s and twenty seven Class40s. Given the upwind conditions, the older, conventionally foiled IMOCA 60s were prevailing. At 1630 Paul Meilhat and Jules Verne Trophy record holder crewman Gwénolé Gahinet aboard SMA, the 2012-3 Vendee Globe (and the 2013 Rolex Fastnet Race) winner as MACIF, were leading the 60s past Portland Bill. The first ‘foil-assisted’ IMOCA 60 was favourite Alex Thomson and Nicholas O’Leary on Hugo Boss in third place, taking a northerly route, close to the land.

In the Class40s present championship leader Phil Sharp on board Imerys led past St Alban’s Head, but later there was little too choose with the British boat neck and neck for the lead in this incredible fleet with the Maxime Sorel-skippered V And B, Burkhard Keese’s Stella Nova, Benoit Charon’s LMAX Normandie and race veteran Halvard Mabire and Miranda Merron on Campagne de France.

The five IRC handicap classes, chasing the race’s overall prize of the Fastnet Challenge Cup started with the smallest boats first at 1120.

This afternoon at 1600, the IRC One fleet had fanned out across the course to the southeast of St Alban’s Head. James Neville’s HH42 Ino XXX was leading the charge inshore as Staffan Wincrantz’s Arcona 465 SALT 2.0 was ahead on the water to the south, just ahead of the venerable 1960s maxi Kialoa II, owned by Patrick Broughton.

 

Mid-afternoon, competitors in IRC Two were favouring the inshore route with Dutchman Frans Rodenburg’s First 40 Elke, closest to St Alban’s Head at 1620, with class favourite Gilles Fournier and Corinne Migraine’s J/133 Pintia nearby.

Marc Alperovitch’s JPK 1080, Timeline in the largest class – IRC 3 © Rolex/Carlo Borlenghi

The IRC Three boats were following a similar tactic with the offshore tack being less popular. Having started 20 minutes earlier, they were still successfully fending off the advances of the larger, faster IRC Two fleet. The Russian JPK 10.80, Igor Rytov’s Boyatyr, was leading the pack inshore while the brilliantly-named Seafarers Ale Anticipation, the First 40.7 of former 470 Olympian Pete Newlands, was ahead on the water offshore.

The inshore-offshore spread was more evenly distributed among the smallest boats in IRC Four. Here Noel Racine’s impeccably sailed JPK 10.10 Foggy Dew was ahead inshore while Dan Rigden’s Elan 37 Tacktic was furthest down the track out to sea.

The last to start were the largest in the IRC fleet, IRC Zero, including the line honours contenders George David’s Rambler 88 and Ludde Ingvall’s 100ft CQS. By 1520 Rambler 88 was off and close into St Alban’s Head, leading IRC Zero on the water just ahead of the biggest boat in the fleet, the 115ft Nikata.

Rambler 88 (Photo © Barry James Wilson)

Rambler 88 (Photo © Barry James Wilson)

Rambler 88 (Photo © Barry James Wilson)

Rambler 88 (Photo © Barry James Wilson)

Among the seven one design VO65s competing in ‘Leg 0’ of the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race, it was very close, with the Charles Caudrelier-skippered Dongfeng Race Team a nose ahead and making 12.3 knots but facing a threat from Team Brunel, skippered again by Dutch race veteran Bouwe Bekking, making 12.5 as the boats passed St Alban’s Head.

This morning Xabi Fernández, skipper of MAPFRE, looked forward to the race: “Once out of the Solent it will be upwind sailing up to the Fastnet rock, and finally we will sail downwind towards Plymouth. This is the first time I’ve competed in the Rolex Fastnet Race. It is a historic race, much like the Rolex Sydney Hobart.”

Joan Vila, MAPFRE’s legendary navigator confirmed the forecast: “Once we leave the Solent, the wind will blow at around 20 knots. From there, it will drop until tomorrow morning, with the probability of encountering areas of very light wind. As we get closer to Plymouth, the wind will build again.”