John Williams, Owner of J-Class yacht J/5 Ranger. (Photo © George Bekris)

John Williams, Owner of J-Class yacht J/5 Ranger. (Photo © George Bekris)

 

The sailing world is saddened by the sudden passing of  John  Williams, owner of the J-Class yacht Ranger. Mr. Williams passed away on Monday, 16th April.

 J-Class yacht J/5 Ranger. J-Class Regatta 2017 Newport, RI (Photo © George Bekris)

J-Class yacht J/5 Ranger. J-Class Regatta 2017 Newport, RI (Photo © George Bekris)

John, a prominent property developer in Atlanta, Georgia, was a leading light in the J Class for many years. His vision and passion for Ranger, the J Class and its long history was instrumental in the formation of the J Class Association and the consequent renaissance the class is enjoying presently.

After being inspired by seeing Velsehda and Endeavour racing in the Caribbean in the late 1990s, he chartered Endeavour to race in Antigua. That was the catalyst for his decision to commission the build of Ranger, the first J Class yacht to be built since the 1930s. Construction started at the Danish Yacht Boatyard in early 2002.

He raced and cruised Ranger extensively in the Caribbean, Europe and all around the world with considerable success.

His boat Ranger won the 2011 J-Class Regatta in Newport, RI. His boat was an often seen racer in the Newport area.

Crew of Ranger in 2011 after winning the Newport J-Class Regatta (Photo by George Bekris)

Crew of Ranger in 2011 after winning the Newport J-Class Regatta (Photo by George Bekris)

John Williams is survived by his wife Nancy, three children; Jay, Sarah Brook and Parker, and two grandchildren; Jack and Harrison. The thoughts and condolences of the wider J Class community are extended to his family and to all of the Ranger family.

John’s long serving ‘admiral of the fleet’ Dan Jackson notes: “As far as yachting goes, John started about 30 years ago and worked his way up from a 50ft sloop to building “Atlanta”, “Georgia” and then “Ranger”, which we launched in 2003.

“He was never happier than when on the boat with a full race crew mixing it up with other J boats. As far as significant wins, he was always proud of the wins in Sardinia at the Rolex Maxi Cup and the “clean sweep” that we had in St Tropez in 2014, winning all of the races. He loved having his family and the race crew (his second family) around him, enjoying the boat.”

 J-Class yacht J/5 Ranger. J-Class Regatta 2017 Newport, RI (Photo © George Bekris)

J-Class yacht J/5 Ranger. J-Class Regatta 2017 Newport, RI (Photo © George Bekris)

Spindrift 2 Maxi Trimaran Dona Bertarelli

Spindrift 2 Maxi Trimaran Dona Bertarelli

by Christophe Guigueno

The dismantling of the maxi-trimaran of 40 meters between Brest and the starting line of the Trophy Jules Verne last winter was stored in the trunk of bad memories on the side of Spindrift Racing. But the failure of the 100% male crew led the co-creator with Yann Guichard of the Swiss team to take the reins of the trimaran to set up a women-only crew for the next attempt against the world record  sailing.

 

In 2015, Dona Bertarelli was part of the crew of the trimaran Spindrift 2, formerly Banque Populaire and the largest offshore racing trimaran in the world. By completing the world tour in 47 days 1 hour 17 minutes and 41 seconds, the maxi-tri did not beat the Jules Verne Trophy record . But her co-skipper became the fastest woman around the world to sail. A title she now wants to share with other women.

A group drawn from the pool of the Volvo Ocean Race

The timing is also perfect for the Swiss, as under the initiative of Mark Turner, the Volvo Ocean Race , the crewed world tour with stopover aboard 65-foot monohulls, required the crew to board at least two women on board. This new rule means that many young women have acquired an enormous experience of the open sea on which Dona Bertarelli will be able to rely to build an international crew.

According to our sources, an emissary of Spindrift Racing was present in New Zealand during the last stopover to meet these potential teammates and present the project. A contact that would have met with great success with these women who, after a mixed world tour but a minority on board, would be ready to follow the wake of Tracy Edwards. A Frenchwoman also said she did not fear the pressure on men’s performance: “l pressure, I drink, I do not suffer!” she added …

In the wake of Edwards and MacArthur

A Jules Verne Trophy 100% feminine, it would not be a first since in 1998, the English Tracy Edwards who had already led a crew “zero testo” aboard the catamaran Royal Sun Alliance, the former Enza of Peter Blake born under the name Formula TAG for Mike Birch and now converted into a zero emission catamaran under the name of Energy Observer. After two years of preparation and numerous records, including the crossing of the English Channel, Tracy Edwards and her crew of 10 women (including her compatriot Samantha Davies) set off off Ouessant. The adventure ended on a dismasting 2000 miles from Chile.

Five years after this attempt, another woman tackles the challenge initiated by Yves Le Cornec, Titouan Lamazou and Florence Arthaud. This is Ellen MacArthur who starts the world tour with … 13 teammates! For the Englishwoman, the circumnavigation ends once again on a dismasting, this time off the Kerguelen.

Dismantling of Royal Sun Alliance, Kingfisher 2, Spindrift 2 … Attempts often end with a spar at the bottom of the water. So if Dona Bertarelli takes over the torch and will leave this winter with her 40 meter trimaran to establish this first time around the world with a 100% female crew, it will not be to plant it again at the bottom of the water but for the sting at the top of the sail all genders confused …

 


Women’s World Tours:
-  2015: Dona Bertarelli, co-skipper of the trimaran Spindrift 2: 47d 1h 17 ’41’ ‘(fastest woman around the world)
- 2003: Ellen MacArthur skipper of the catamaran Kingfisher 2 with 13 crew members. Departure on January 30, 2003. Drainage off the Kerguelen
- 1998: Tracy Edwards skipper of the Royal & Sun Alliance catamaran with a 100% female crew. Dismantling off Chile.

by Christophe Guigueno
St Barths Bucket (Photo © JCLASS/Carlo Borlenghi/ Studio Borlenghi )

St Barths Bucket (Photo © JCLASS/Carlo Borlenghi/ Studio Borlenghi )

As this beautiful island is still getting back to normal, the excitement of the Bucket is the same as ever. St Barths is a close-knit community that has been working non-stop to be ready for us, and as the sailors and guests arrive, we realize we are part of this special family. Everyone asks in earnest how their island friends are, how their homes survived.

It’s been a long road with some extra bumps in it for sure. Last week a “Surge” with a capital S closed the Port of Gustavia, prohibited ferry service and cargo drop-offs, and caused a paralyzing island-wide phone and internet outage. Port Director Ernest Brin said, “The surge was 3.5 metres at 17 and 19 seconds,” he said, “with the water so high it was hitting our office windows!” Brin is a hands-on kind of guy and doesn’t simply direct Port operations from his place on high; he’s often there to catch a dock line or otherwise lend a personal hand to visiting Buckateers. He even brings flowers every year to the “Bucket girls” who run registration.

Photo © 2018 Ed GudenasThe swell also effected J Class Svea. Their race sails and equipment missed getting unloaded on schedule last week when the container ship that was carrying the goods was forced to hold up offshore because of the Surge. Svea warriors tracked it down and made a passage with their J Class yacht to St. Martin on Tuesday to execute an interception. The team unloaded their containers themselves, taking hours to pile high Svea’s deck. The process, in reverse, repeated itself at the docks of the Capitainerie on Wednesday. It was not ideal and didn’t allow for any practice days. Svea and many others were able to resolve the situation. And, Svea won Thursday’s J Class race. 

Photo © 2018 Ed GudenasNorth Sails also overcame challenges.  On Wednesday, James Downing and Macia Alleminy from the North Sails Superyacht loft in Mallorca, were prepping Wisp’sspinnaker for repair in their mobile Bucket loft across the harbor and waiting for sewing machines – due to be delivered three weeks ago – to show up. “We’ve got back-up from the local loft, but it’s very small,” said Downing who thought perhaps his ship might have finally come in at the same time as Svea’s.

Owners, sponsors and other guests enjoyed a strikingly lovely evening Thursday at a private home on the west side of the island. For the 300 or more attending, the chef from Maya’s Restaurant created delectable appetizers while champagne flowed from bottles kept in illuminated bowls. The outer and inner harbor were similarly aglow with lights from the 26 Superyacht chariots that, by day, await those who are fortunate enough to be participating in the Bucket racing and other activities here this week.

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

 

March 10, 2018 02:00 UTC
Written by Peter Rusch

Dongfeng Race Team earned a spectacular come from behind win on Saturday afternoon in New Zealand

Dongfeng Race Team showed great concentration and resilience in winning the New Zealand Herald In Port Race in Auckland, New Zealand on Saturday.

Conditions were extremely light, shifty and patchy on the Waitematā Harbour, making for plenty of lead changes over the course of the one hour race.

Team AkzoNobel finished in second place, while early leaders MAPFRE completed the podium to retain the overall lead in the In Port Race Series.

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

“It was very tricky, very difficult,” said Dongfeng skipper Charles Caudrelier following the race. “We had a terrible start but there was so much happening during the first leg that it wasn’t always good to be in the lead as you just showed the others where the light spots were. We were able to pick up on that and sail around the leaders.

“We worked hard on our speed, and managed to come back slowly.”

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

The race started in spectacular fashion, considering how light the wind was. MAPFRE positioned well to leeward of the fleet, was first across the line, with David Witt’s Scallywag barging through with speed ahead of a big group clustered near the pin end.

But in fact, it was Team Brunel who were causing the pile-up at the pin, forcing three boats outside of the start line, with Dongfeng, Turn the Tide on Plastic and team AkzoNobel all required to re-start well behind the leaders.

That left MAPFRE and Scallywag as the early leaders, charging up what appeared to be a one-tack leg.

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

But as they approached the top third of the leg, the wind died, and the trailing boats were able to sail around the leading pair on both sides, with AkzoNobel and Vestas 11th Hour Racing squeezing through just ahead of Dongfeng Race Team and Brunel Sailing.

On the nominally downwind second leg, AkzoNobel and Dongfeng found a vein of pressure to grab the lead, and on a shortened two-lap course, it was Dongfeng who were able to ease ahead and hold on for the win.

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 10 March, 2018. (photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

“It was a good team win,” said Caudrelier. “Very good for the mood of the team.”

The results mean MAPFRE retains the overall lead in the series, with Dongfeng reducing the gap to second place and team AkzoNobel leapfrogging Brunel to take third.


Current Volvo Ocean Race In-Port Race Series Leaderboard

1. MAPFRE – 37 points
2. Dongfeng Race Team – 34 points
3. team AkzoNobel – 27 points
4. Team Brunel – 26 points
5. Vestas 11th Hour Racing – 18 points
6. Sun Hung Kai / Scallywag – 15 points
7. Turn the Tide on Plastic – 11 points

Auckland Stopover. The New Zealand Herald In-Port Race. 09 March, 2018. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

 

#volvooceanrace #dongfeng #auckland #inport

Auckland Stopover. (Photo © Jesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race )

Mark Towill, Team Vestas 11th Hour Racing (Photo by Atila Madrona/ Vestas 11th Hour Racing )

Mark Towill, Team Vestas 11th Hour Racing (Photo by Atila Madrona/ Vestas 11th Hour Racing )

 

 

Vestas 11th Hour Racing co-founder, Mark Towill, spent time at home with family and friends after departing the Volvo Ocean Race Hong Kong stopover where the team’s VO65 was involved in a tragic accident with a fishing vessel. Towill has now regrouped with the team and their VO65 yacht in Auckland, New Zealand, ahead of the next leg of the race. The team has now been informed that investigations by the Hong Kong and mainland China authorities will be closed shortly with no further action to be taken. As a result, Towill gives us his account on what happened in the early hours of January 20 in the approach to Hong Kong.

 

What happened as you approached the finish line of Leg 4? 

We were about 30 nautical miles from the finish, and I was at the navigation station monitoring the radar and AIS (Automatic Identification System), and communicating with the crew on-deck through the intercom. I was watching three vessels on AIS: a cable layer, which we had just passed, a vessel farther ahead moving across our bow and away, and a third vessel identified as a fishing vessel. There were a number of additional boats on AIS, many of them fishing vessels, but these three were the only ones identified in our vicinity.
What were the conditions like? What could you see?

It was a dark and cloudy night, with a breeze of around 20 knots and a moderate sea state. As we approached the fishing vessel that we had identified on AIS, the on-deck crew confirmed visual contact – the fishing vessel was well lit – and we headed up to starboard to keep clear. I was watching AIS and communicating the range and bearing to the crew. The crew confirmed we were crossing the fishing vessel when, before the anticipated cross, there was an unexpected collision.

 

What happened immediately after the collision?

So much happened so fast. The impact from the collision spun us into a tack to port that we weren’t prepared for. Everyone who was off watch came on deck. Everyone on our boat was safe and accounted for. We checked the bow, saw the hole in the port side and went below to assess the damage. Water was flowing into our boat through the hole, and there was concern over the structural integrity of the bow.

 

How did you control the ingress of water?

We heeled the boat to starboard to keep the port bow out of the water. The sail stack was already to starboard and the starboard water ballast tank was full. We also kept the keel canted to starboard. We placed our emergency pump in the bow to pump water overboard. We were able to minimize the ingress, but the boat was difficult to maneuver because it was heeled over so much.
What actions did you take immediately after getting your boat under control?

It took roughly 20 minutes to get our boat under control, and then we headed back towards the location of the collision. Upon arrival, several people on a fishing vessel nearby were shining lights to a point on the water. Our first thought was that they could be looking for someone, so we immediately started a search and rescue. After some time searching, we eventually spotted a person in the water.

 

Who were you in communication with? Did anyone offer assistance?

We tried to contact the other vessel involved in the collision, and alerted race control straight away. When we initiated the search and rescue, our navigator immediately issued a Mayday distress call over VHF channel 16 on behalf of the fishing vessel. There were many vessels in the area, including a cruise ship with a hospital bay, but they were all standing by.

Communication was difficult. The sheer volume of traffic on the radio meant it was hard to communicate to the people we needed to. Not many people on the VHF were speaking English, but we found a way to relay messages through a cable laying vessel, and they were able to send their guard boat to aid in the search and rescue.
How was the casualty retrieved?

Difficult conditions and limited maneuverability hampered our initial efforts to retrieve the casualty. The guard boat from the cable layer provided assistance and every effort was made from all parties involved in the search and rescue. We were finally able to successfully recover the casualty after several attempts. When we got him aboard, our medics started CPR. We alerted Hong Kong Marine Rescue Coordination Centre that we had the casualty aboard and they confirmed air support was on its way. He was transferred to a helicopter and taken to a Hong Kong hospital where medical staff where unable to revive him.

 

Did any of your competitors offer assistance?

Dongfeng Race Team offered assistance. At the time, we were coordinating the search and rescue with multiple vessels, including the cable layer that had a crewman who spoke Chinese and English and was relaying our communication. We advised Dongfeng that they were not needed as there were a number of vessels in the area that were closer.

Team AkzoNobel arrived while the air transfer was in effect. Race control requested that they stand by and they did, and we later released them once the helicopter transfer was complete.

 

What happened after the search and rescue procedure was completed?

Once we knew there was nothing more we could do at the scene of the accident, we ensured our boat was still secure, and informed Volvo Ocean Race that we would retire from the leg and motor to shore. We arrived at the technical area nearby the race village and met with race officials and local authorities to give our account of what happened.

Enright Vestas 11th Hour Racing (Photo by Atila Madrona/ Vestas 11th Hour Racing )

Enright Vestas 11th Hour Racing (Photo by Atila Madrona/ Vestas 11th Hour Racing )

Team will participate in next Southern Ocean leg around Cape Horn and onward to Brazil

Auckland, New Zealand (March 2, 2018) — When Vestas 11th Hour Racing rejoins the Volvo Ocean Race for the grueling Leg 7—from New Zealand, across the Southern Ocean, past Cape Horn and into Brazil—the crew will do so with a mixture of heavy hearts and anxiousness.

The team hasn’t raced since the collision in the latter stages of Leg 4, during the final approach to Hong Kong.

Just after 0100 hours on the morning of January 20 (local Hong Kong time), Vestas 11th Hour Racing was involved in a collision with a fishing vessel. Shortly after the accident, nine Chinese fishermen were rescued, however, one other very sadly perished. The Vestas 11th Hour Racing crew were not injured, but the VO65 race yacht suffered significant damage to its port bow. See Q&A with Mark Towill, skipper of Leg 4 for additional information on the incident.

The loss of a life still weighs heavily on the minds of Mark Towill and Charlie Enright, the co-founders of the team, and every other team member. “On behalf of the team, our thoughts and prayers go out to the deceased’s family,” said 29-year-old Towill. Out of respect for the process, the deceased and his family, the team has remained silent throughout the investigation.

Towill was skipper on Leg 4 because Enright had to sit out due to a family crisis. During Leg 3, from South Africa to Australia, Enright’s 2-year-old son had been admitted to the hospital with a case of bacterial pneumonia. Immediately before the end of Leg 4, Enright traveled to Hong Kong to greet the crew at the finish line, but instead had to play an active role in the crisis management process from the shore.

“I have been asked if it would have been different if I was onboard. Definitely not,” said Enright. “The crew has been well trained in crisis situations and performed as they should. They knew what to do and I think they did a phenomenal job given the circumstances. There comes a point when family is more important than the job you’ve been hired to do and I was at that point. I did what was best for my family.”

“The team was engaged in search and rescue for more than two hours with a compromised race boat,” Enright said. “I’m very proud of our crew. We were in a very difficult situation with the damage to the bow, but everyone acted professionally and without hesitation,” added Towill.

Despite the badly damaged bow, Towill and the crew of the stricken Vestas 11th Hour Racing boat carried out a search and rescue effort, which culminated in a casualty being retrieved and transferred to a helicopter, with the assistance of Hong Kong Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre.

The Vestas 11th Hour Racing VO65 was shipped to New Zealand from Hong Kong on January 28. A new port bow section was laid up over a VO65 hull mold at Persico Marine in Italy and then sent to New Zealand, where it was spliced to the hull of the team’s VO65 in the past two weeks.

Enright and Towill both complimented team manager Bill Erkelens, who has played a central role keeping the team together since the accident. Erkelens put together Enright and Towill’s program in the 2014-’15 Volvo Ocean Race and he was the first person they hired for the current team.

The team hopes to relaunch their VO65 in the coming days and will then spend some time practicing and possibly complete an overnight sail.

In the 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race, Enright and Towill’s crew led the fleet around Cape Horn by 15 minutes. It had been two weeks of thrilling racing from New Zealand, highlighted by 50-knot winds and a jibing duel along the ice boundary and a tight port/starboard crossing.

“That was an experience that’s still very fresh in my mind,” said Enright. “It was a hair-raising leg, with lots of maneuvers and heavy conditions. We’ll have to be on our toes again because the Southern Ocean demands respect. I imagine once we get a couple of days out of Auckland we’ll settle into the normal pattern of life at sea.”

Leg 7 of the Volvo Ocean Race, approximately 6,700 nautical miles to Itajaí, Brazil, is scheduled to begin March 18. Prior to that the New Zealand In-Port Race is scheduled March 10.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. ( Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. ( Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Team AkzoNobel took the win in the HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong on a challenging afternoon on the waters of Kowloon Bay.

The wind during race time was a 6 to 10 knot Easterly, but it was very shifty and puffy, and with a tidal current running on the race course, it was a difficult day for the tacticians.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

“We had a fantastic race, pretty exciting. We planned to sail our own race today. It was tricky enough with the tide and the windshifts,” said team AkzoNobel skipper Simeon Tienpont.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. ( Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. ( Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

“The team sailed an unbelievable race and the guys in the back of the boat played the tactics very well… It’s good when things come together. It’s a nice reward for all the effort the team has put in.”

Dongfeng Race Team finished in second place, with Team Brunel third. The two swapped places on the third lap of the course after a solid upwind leg by Brunel gave them the lead, but the Dongfeng crew fought back on the run to secure second place.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

A fourth place finish on Saturday by the series leader MAPFRE means Dongfeng vaults to the top of the table.

But it’s a tight leaderboard and it could compress further following Sunday’s Around Hong Kong Island Race, when results of the weekend of racing will be combined to assign the points from this stopover.

Hong Kong’s hometown heroes Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag had a fantastic start, but fell back and battled to a fifth place finish over Turn the Tide on Plastic on Saturday. Both teams will be determined to move up with a better result on Sunday.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

The Around Hong Kong Island Race is scheduled to start at 11:30am local time in Hong Kong (0330 UTC). There will be live coverage of the start and finish of Sunday’s race on www.volvooceanrace.com, on Facebook and Twitter @volvooceanrace. Fans will be able to follow the full race on the tracker via www.volvooceanrace.com.

Vestas 11th Hour Racing will not race this weekend or on Leg 5 to Guangzhou next week as the team coordinates repairs to its boat – see more here.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Pedro Martinez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Current Volvo Ocean Race In-Port Race leaderboard 
Dongfeng Race Team – 24 points
MAPFRE – 23 points
team AkzoNobel – 18 points
Team Brunel – 18 points
Vestas 11th Hour Racing – 12 points
Sun Hung Kai / Scallywag – 9 points
Turn the Tide on Plastic – 7 points

*** Note: The above leaderboard reflects full points assigned from Saturday’s HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. On Sunday, the results of the Around Hong Kong Island race will be combined with Saturday’s HGC In-Port Race to award the overall leader from this weekend’s racing a maximum of seven points from Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018.  (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Hong Kong Stopover. HGC In-Port Race Hong Kong. 27 January, 2018. (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

eg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 17, Photo by Amory Ross/Volvo Ocean Race. 18 January, 2018.

Leg 4, Melbourne to Hong Kong, day 17, Photo by Amory Ross/Volvo Ocean Race. 18 January, 2018.

The Volvo Ocean Race can confirm Vestas 11th Hour Racing, one of the teams competing in the 2017-18 race, has been involved in a collision with a non-race vessel before the finish of Leg 4, near Hong Kong.

The team has retired from Leg 4 and is proceeding to Hong Kong unassisted and under its own power.

Race Control at Volvo Ocean Race headquarters was informed of the collision by the team moments after it happened at approximately 17:23 UTC on Friday January 19, 2018 (01:23 local time on Saturday morning).

The Vestas 11th Hour Racing team issued a Mayday distress call on behalf of the other vessel, alerting the Hong Kong Marine Rescue Coordination Centre (HKMRCC) and undertook a search and rescue mission.

HKMRCC has informed Race Control that a commercial vessel in the area was able to rescue nine of the crew and that a tenth crew member was taken by helicopter to hospital.

All of the crew on Vestas 11th Hour Racing are safe. Their boat suffered damage and the team has officially retired from the leg, but the team is able to motor to shore.

The Volvo Ocean Race is deeply saddened to inform that the collision between Vestas 11th Hour Racing, a team competing in the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18, and a fishing vessel has resulted in a fatality of a crew of the fishing vessel.

On behalf of the Volvo Ocean Race and Vestas 11th Hour Racing, we offer our deepest condolences to the loved ones of the deceased.

The incident occurred approximately 30 miles from the finish of Leg 4, outside of Hong Kong waters. Race Control at Volvo Ocean Race headquarters was informed of the collision by the team moments after it happened at approximately 17:23 UTC on Friday January 19, 2018 (01:23 local time on Saturday morning).

The Vestas 11th Hour Racing team, none of whom were injured in the collision, issued a Mayday distress call on behalf of the other vessel, alerting the Hong Kong Marine Rescue Coordination Centre (HKMRCC) and undertook a search and rescue mission.

HKMRCC informed Race Control that a commercial vessel in the area was able to rescue nine of the crew and that a tenth crew member was taken by helicopter to hospital. HKMRCC has since confirmed the death of the air-lifted crew member.

Volvo Ocean Race and Vestas 11th Hour Racing are now focused on providing immediate support to those affected by this incident.

All involved organisations are co-operating with the authorities and are fully supporting the ongoing investigation.