Newport Bermuda Race Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

Newport Bermuda Race 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

By John Rousmaniere,

 June 16, 2016 — As nearly 1,700 sailors who will soon race to Bermuda make their preparations, loading food and gear into their boats and lining up to pre-clear Bermuda customs and immigration, all of them have one question in mind: “What will the weather be?” And one answer:  “I just hope it’ll favor my boat.”

Sailors don’t agree on much.  Some prefer big boats, some small. Some like light displacement, others heavy. Yet this question and answer can be counted on whenever two or three of us are gathered together. We all talk about the weather, and talk and talk. The weather is our obsession.

On land, “Everybody talks about the weather, but nobody does anything about it,” to quote Mark Twain (or his friend Charles Dudley Warner — the sources disagree).  But on water, we can do something about it.  We trim or shorten sail, we change course, and we look around for better weather.

Newport Bermuda Race 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

Weather is the deep concern of the 2016 Bermuda Race fleet of 184 boats. There has been some attrition, some due to boat damage during deliveries and in a race. One withdrawal is the Maxi 72 Bella Mente, a frequent candidate to be first to finish that is not sailing this time out of her owner’s weather concerns.

Over the past three days, conflicting weather forecasts have stirred up concern about the conditions that will confront the fleet after the start on Friday. One forecast seemed to indicate a high wind at the start, another suggested a hard blow down the course, and a third offered the specter of rough going, with a hard north wind.

That last weather alert has attracted a lot of attention because of the Gulf Stream. The body of water running northeast is Benjamin Franklin’s “River in the Ocean.” It’s more like a drifting octopus—a complicated patch of moving water turning in every which direction and greatly affecting the state of the sea.  To quote the race’s Gulf Stream expert (and multi-time navigator), oceanographer Dr. Frank Bohlen, “Wind blowing against the current results in a significantly larger wave amplitude and shorter wavelength than what appears when wind blows with current or when there is no current.”

Click here for Frank Bohlen’s analysis of this year’s Gulf Stream.

Newport Bermuda 2010 Start (Photo by George Bekris)

Newport Bermuda 2010 Start (Photo by George Bekris)

History marks two postponements

Despite more than 100 years of excited sailor talk about the weather in 49 races, only two Bermuda Race starts have been postponed a day or longer. The 1968 start was delayed for one day out of concern about an early-season hurricane.  Then in 1982, the race committee, chaired by James A. McCurdy (father of Selkie skipper Sheila McCurdy), postponed the start for two days because of a storm in the Western Atlantic. Once the weather settled down, the then-record 178 starters got off the line quickly on a spinnaker reach.

Carina (Photo by George Bekris )

Carina (Photo by George Bekris )

There’s another, quite startling weather story about the 1982 race.  Carina (today owned by Rives Potts) was sailing almost directly toward Bermuda when her owner-skipper, Richard Nye, poked his head up through the companionway and took a look upwind around just as a lightning bolt flashed down to the water.  “Tack,” Nye ordered. The crew looked at him incredulously. They were only 10 degrees off the layline to the finish. “Tack! There’s lightning to windward. There’s warm water up there. The Gulf Stream’s up there.”

Carina tacked, sailed on the “wrong” tack for a couple of hours until she was well into hot water, tacked back, and with a 3-knot current on her stern, charged toward Bermuda at 10-plus knots over the bottom. She won her division by a comfortable 34 minutes.

That’s one good reason why we obsess about weather.

Newport Bermuda Race 2016 Entries

Click here for more facts about the Newport Bermuda Race.

Newport Bermuda Race 2014 start (Photo by George Bekris)

Watch the start and follow your favorites to Bermuda

Coming alive for you on BermudaRace.com … join Livestream 2PM-5PM on Friday June 17 for live video and commentary on the start. Commentator Andy Green will be host the program from the Inn at Castle Hill overlooking the starting line. With cameras on the hill and on the water, he’ll get close to the action bringing live sailing directly to you. Audio also airs on Newport radio FM 105.9.

Virtual spectators will watch the story unfold as their favorite yachts, skippers, or crew members in this 635-mile ocean classic tack and gybe their way through the Gulf Stream and hunt for the wind in the ‘happy valley’ north of Bermuda. All boats in the 2016 fleet will be tracked by YB satellite trackers as live as it can be on Pantaenius Race Tracking — www.pantaenius.com/NBRtracking — your link to all the action in the race.

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

 

The 116-foot sloop Whisper will be chartering in New England this summer, will contributing a portion of its sales to Project Puffin. (Photo Courtesy of Whisper/Churchill Yachts)

The 116-foot sloop Whisper will be chartering in New England this summer, will contributing a portion of its sales to Project Puffin. (Photo Courtesy of Whisper/Churchill Yachts)

NEWPORT, R.I. (April 13, 2015) – This summer, Churchill Yacht Partners’ 116-foot sailing yacht Whisper will be giving back to the New England region in which she charters by donating a portion of her season’s sales to Project Puffin, an organization that protects the rare seabirds and their historic nesting islands off the coast of Maine. Started by the National Audubon Society in 1973, the project is designed to restore the puffin population and educate people on the plethora of environmental issues that are threatening the seabird and could, in turn, lead to their endangerment.

“New England is a prime destination for chartering which is largely due to the fact that people love its scenic charm and natural allure,” said Whisper’s Charter Manager at Churchill Yachts, Kaisa Pace (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.). “If we don’t protect the region’s environment and its wildlife, then there is no saying what will happen to its beautiful coastline. By supporting Project Puffin, Whisper is taking its first step in giving back to the region we all love so much.”

Project Puffin

Project Puffin

Whisper will be participating in the 2015 Newport Charter Yacht Show from June 22-25, after which she will be available for bookings in the New England Region through early September. The luxury yacht charters from $60,000 per week (plus APA expenses) and will donate one percent of all the season’s charter sales to Project Puffin. Contact your favorite charter broker to inquire.

More About Whisper:
Whisper’s three spacious staterooms sleep six guests comfortably. Its lavish master suite boasts an office area, ensuite facilities with a steam shower and a private companionway. The teak interior is adorned with intricate inlays and carvings and includes a roomy salon, complete with a formal dining area. The upper pilothouse lounge boasts a full wet bar with panoramic views of the horizon.

The yacht is fully air-conditioned and its cockpit is equipped with an awning and large outdoor table for entertaining a flurry of guests. In terms of entertainment, Whisper has televisions in its master suite, pilothouse and main salon and offers WiFi and Cable. For water activities, a 15-foot motorboat, two kayaks, two paddleboards, a wakeboard, water skis and snorkel gear stand at the ready.

To download a gallery of high resolution, editorial free photos of the luxury yacht, visit http://www.acdseeonline.com/share-view/Media+Pro+International/99c1JBNt8BWTTPYqp0Hh/

For more information, contact Kaisa Pace at Churchill Yacht Partners, 954-527-2626, KPace@ChurchillYachts.com or visit http://www.WhisperYacht.com.

projectpuffin.audubon.org

http://projectpuffin.audubon.org

Atmosphere on the dockside at Les Voiles de Saint Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

Atmosphere on the dockside at Les Voiles de Saint Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

On the eve of the third running of Les Voiles de St. Barth, April 2-7, the palm-fringed port of Gustavia, St.Barthlemy quickly filled with an impressive array of race boats: ocean-racing maxis including the 90-foot Rambler and the Swan 112, Highland Breeze; classic beauties such the Olin Stephen-designed Dorade and the Fife-built yawl Mariella; a trio of IRC 52s, multi-hulls including the 66 Gunboat Phaedo, and two large racing classes with a mix of Melges, J/boats, and a mix of 40-footers, including the hot-off-the-press Carkeek 40, Decision.

Over 60 boats are registered for this years edition, up fromwith a large number of returning entries, proof that the regatta has filled the need for spirited competition towards the end of the winter season a time when tourism typically begins to wind down in the Caribbean. Though that was hard to tell yesterday, at the islands tiny airport, as the steady stream of small commuter planes landing were filled with a duffle bag-wielding collection of sailors from the ranks of the Americas Cup, round-the-world-ocean races, and Olympic competition, that included Gavin Brady (Vesper), Scott Vogel (Rambler), Bouwe Bekking (Nilaya), Cam Lewis (Paradox), Charlie McKee and Ross MacDonald (Mayhem), Tony Rey, Jeff Madrigali, and Nacho Postigo (Powerplay), and Dee Smith (Decision).

But its not just the professionals that flock to Les Voiles de St. Barth, the regattas program and mix of courses also appeals to a competitive group of amateur and family racers that hone their skills on the growing circuit of Caribbean regattas that take advantage of this sailing paradise.

Nilaya heads out for practice prior to the start of Les Voiles de St Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

Nilaya heads out for practice prior to the start of Les Voiles de St Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

While not the easiest of destinations to reach some U.S. west coast sailors logged 16+ hours in transit, while others from Europe only slightly less the island of St Barths itself is a welcome reward at the end of the road: a turquoise blue, crystal-clear sea, pristine white sand beaches, and an array of fabulous restaurants just payoff for a long days journey.

Francesco Mongelli, navigator onboard Jim Swartz IRC52 Vesper, is here racing in St Barths for the first time. The Italian sailor, who sails primarily in Europe, has been racing with the Vesper crew since last October, and was clearly keen to have touched down in this French paradise, Its a mix of all the best sailing places, together with perfect weather and good food. Having spent the afternoon in a tender carefully checking out the coastline and charted (and uncharted) rock outcroppings, Mongelli added, Its pretty similar to Porto Cervo, the difference is that there you more or less know where everything is, and the charts are accurate. You cannot take the same risk here that wed take in Porto Cervo.

Racing will run from Tuesday, April 3 Saturday, April 7 and will feature a mix of Olympic triangles, short coastal courses, and a 20-30 nautical mile round-the island race. The fleet will be split into seven classes: Maxi (> 21 meters), IRC52 (former TP52s that have been optimized for the IRC rule), Spinnaker I + II, Non-Spinnaker (racer/cruiser), Classic (vintage/traditional), and Multihull. Thursday is a layday at Nikki Beach, with lunch and a full afternoon of activities, including a paddleboard competition.

New this year, Les Voiles will offer real-time race tracking with 2D visualization via the internet. Waypoint-Tracking (www.waypoint-tracking.com) developed the system in close collaboration with ISAF. The site will allow enthusiasts to follow the daily racing action live or to replay at a later time.

Many of the competing boats are moored stern-to at the Quai General de Gaulle, site of the Race Village, where all of the daily breakfast and post-race activities and music take place. This evening, skippers and tacticians were on hand for the Skippers Briefing led by Loic Ponceau, Race Committee Chairman, and organizers Francois Tolede, Luc Poupon, and Annelisa Gee. Following that was Les Voiles St. Barth Opening Ceremony, where Bruno Magras, President of the Collectivit of St. Barth, welcomed more than 500 sailors to the weeklong event.

Whisper heads out to practice for Les Voiles de Saint Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

Whisper heads out to practice for Les Voiles de Saint Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

A regular and enthusiastic competitor in the Caribbean, Sir Peter Harrison was named the godfather or patron of this years Les Voiles. Harrison, owner of the 115-foot Farr-designed Sojana, told the crowd, As a visitor from England to this beautiful French island, one of the most beautiful in the West Indies, Im thrilled to be asked to the patron of Les Voiles. Bon vent Les Voiles de St. Barth, and good luck, everyone!

Also sailing on Sojana is Lionel Pan, who is also back for his third Les Voiles. He said, Obviously there are plenty of good reasons to be here, and to come back every year with the same enthusiasm: this place is made for sailing. In a very short time, Les Voiles de St. Barth has become the place to be, very much like Saint Tropez in the Mediterranean. And the word is spreading around. Shortly there will be a waiting list to be a part of the event!

The weather forecast for the next few days calls for light winds, though the breeze is expected to increase throughout the week. Racing is scheduled to start tomorrow, Tuesday, April 3, two miles northwest of Sugarloaf Rock off Gustavia; one race is scheduled with a start time of 12noon.

Gustavia Harbour on the eve of the start of Les Voiles de St Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

Gustavia Harbour on the eve of the start of Les Voiles de St Barth © Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de St. Barth

 

 

Meteor   (Photo by George Bekris)

Meteor (Photo by George Bekris)

By Norma Trease

Emails are already flying back and forth from yachts, to skippers, owners, race crew, the Race Committee, to hotels on island and everything in between, just a short week in advance of the always breathlessly anticipated Saint Barths Bucket, March 22-25, 2012. Soon, yachts, owners and crew will be descending on this verdant little slice of Caribbean heaven, eager to share the tremendous excitement and pure sailing joy that is Bucket Racing.

Beautiful Video of Saint Barths Bucket Regatta 2011  by Superyacht Media

Just announced by the Race Chairman Peter Craig is a spectacular fleet of more than 40 vessels, representing builders and designers worldwide. Once again, the fleet will be split into three classes: Les Gazelles, Les Grandes Dames, and Les Elegantes.

Needless to say, there will be a huge variety in the fleet, which this year will range from 27 to 62m LOA. He has published a detailed description of the various factors involved in the devilishly complicated task of calibrating the classes, so for more details, please do check    St.  Barths Bucket

2012 Entries

Les Elegantes des Mers
Yachts (12) Type Builder Designer LOA
Adela Schooner Pendennis Shipyard Dykstra & Partners 55m
Athos Schooner Holland Jachtbouw Hoek 62m
Bequia Ketch Brooklin Boat Yard Stephens 28m
BooToo Sloop Pendennis Shipyard Holland 27m
Marie Ketch Vitters Shipyard Hoek 55m
Meteor Schooner Royal Huisman Dykstra & Partners 52m
Paraiso Sloop Alloy Yachts Fontaine 33m
Rebecca Ketch Pendennis Shipyard Frers 43m
This is Us Schooner Holland Jachtbouw Hoek 42m
Whisper Sloop Holland Jachtbouw Fontaine 35m
William Tai Ketch Royal Huisman Hood 40m
Windcrest Ketch Hogdon Fontaine 30m
Les Grandes Dames des Mers
Yachts (17) Type Builder Designer LOA
Andromeda la dea Ketch Perini Navi Perini Navi 47m
Antara Ketch Perini Navi Perini Navi 47m
Axia Ketch Palmer Johnson S&S 38m
Baracuda Ketch Perini Navi Holland 50m
Blue Too Ketch Alloy Yachts Holland 34m
Clan VIII Sloop Perini Navi Holland 45m
Destination Sloop Alloy Yachts Dubois 41m
Fidelis Ketch Perini Navi Perini Navi / Holland 56m
Ganesha Sloop Fitzroy Yachts Dubois NA 39m
Genevieve Sloop Alloy Yachts Dubois 37m
Helios II Sloop Perini Navi Holland 45m
Hyperion Sloop Royal Huisman Frers 48m
Koo Sloop Vitters Shipyard Dubois 43m
Moonbird Sloop Fitzroy Yachts Dubois 37m
Panthalassa Ketch Perini Navi Holland 56m
Parsifall III Ketch Perini Navi Holland 54m
Zenji Ketch Perini Navi Holland 56m
Les Gazelles des Mers
Yachts (18) Type Builder Designer LOA
Bliss Sloop Yachting Developments Dubois 37m
Endeavour Sloop Camper & Nicholson Thomas Sopwith 40m
Firefly Sloop Claasen Jachtbouw Hoek 35m
Hanuman Sloop Royal Huisman Dykstra & Partners 42m
Hetairos Ketch Baltic Yachts Dykstra / R/P 67m
Lady B Sloop Vitters Shipyard Dubois 45m
Mari-Cha III Ketch Sensation Briand 45m
P2 Sloop Perini Navi Briand 38m
Ranger Sloop Danish Yachrs Burgess & Stephens 42m
Salperton IV Sloop Fitzroy Dubois 45m
Sojana Ketch Green Farr 35m
Symmetry Sloop Yachting Development Frers 30m
Twizzle Ketch Royal Huisman Dubois 58m
Unfurled Sloop Royal Huisman Frers 34m
Varsovie Sloop Nautor Swan Frers 30m
Velsheda Sloop Camper & Nicholson Nicholson 38m
Virago Sloop Nautor Swan Frers 30m
Zefira Sloop Fitzroy Dubois 50m

CLASS BREAKS

J-Class Hanuman  (Photo by George Bekris)

J-Class Hanuman (Photo by George Bekris)

 

Everyone has a soft spot for one repeat Bucket boat or another, and back this year will be fleet favourites Antara, Andromeda La Dea, Axia, Parsifal III, Ranger and Sojana to mention but a few. A couple of newer beauties will be making their second Bucket appearances including Huismans Twizzle, and Hanuman; joined by Hoek-designed Marie, who fired up the crowds last year with their spectacular air shows of historic WWII planes. Making Bucket debuts this year are Holland Yachtbouw schooner Athos, at 62m the largest Bucket Boat 2012; and of course, it wouldn’t be a Bucket without a couple of brand-new Perini Navis,  Clan VIII and Fidelis.

 

So, Bucket fans worldwide, prepare yourselves for the best week of the year coming up very soon, an annual treat for racing fans, and lovers of beautiful yachts alike. So it’s Bon Voyage and A Bientot until we see you next in Saint Barths!

 

Ran (Photo by George Bekris)

Ran (Photo by George Bekris)

 

The 4th RORC Caribbean 600, starts at 1100 on Monday 20th February. There isn’t a single hotel room left near Antigua Yacht Club, as competitors fly in to the magical island of Antigua from all four corners of the world – Falmouth Harbour is filled to the brim with astounding yachts.

Niklas Zennström’s JV72, Rán, and George David’s RP90, Rambler, are the hot favourites for the RORC Caribbean Trophy, but the two highly impressive yachts are almost hidden in Falmouth Harbour. Rán were out practicing today and Navigator Steve Hayles reports that conditions were a bit lighter than usual, but he expects 15-20 knots of trade winds for the race with their weather routing predicting that they could finish the race in 48 hours, may be less.

RORC member, Stan Pearson has lived and sailed the sublime waters around Antigua for over 20 years. He was one of the creators of the RORC Caribbean 600 and will be racing this year on Adela, the 181′ twin masted schooner:

“I can’t remember ever seeing Nelson’s Dockyard and Falmouth Harbour with so many impressive yachts but I know why they are here; there is nowhere in the world quite like Antigua and the ‘600 is a real celebration of all that the Caribbean has to offer. The sailing is just fantastic; constant trade winds, warm water and air temperature in the high 20’s provides brilliant sailing, but this is a tough race. The course has a lot of corners and there is a lot of activity for the crews. Looking at the fleet, there are going to be some great duels going on, it is going to be a very competitive race.”

For the first time, a Volvo Open 70 will be competing in the RORC Caribbean 600. Some might suggest that the canting keel carbon fibre flyer could have been designed for this course. Ernesto Cortina’s Gran Jotiti has a highly talented Spanish crew and could well be a contender for line honours and an overall win.

IRC Zero has 16 entries and may well be the class to watch for the overall winner. George David’s Rambler 100 is the trophy holder and George David’s all-star crew will not be giving it up without a fight.

 Sojana (Photo courtesy of International Maxi Association)

Sojana (Photo courtesy of International Maxi Association)

With a combined water line length that would soar 500ft above the Eiffel Tower, there are some truly amazing yachts in IRC Zero. The 214′ ketch Hetairos is an impressive sight. The crew of 36 have been out practicing all this week and on board there are enough sails to cover a full size football pitch. Sojana is expected to have a Superyacht duel with 124′ Pernini Navi, P2, owned by businessman and philanthropist, Gerhard Andlinger. Sojana was on mark laying duty today. The only laid mark of the course is the North Sails mark, off Barbuda. No doubt the crew, will be using the exercise to practice the first 45 miles of racing.

In the Spirit of Tradition class Adela will line up against Windrose. This will be the first time these magnificent yachts have raced against each other offshore, however Adela did get the better of Windrose in The Superyacht Challenge inshore regatta. A close battle with these two powerful yachts fully off the leash is a mouth-watering prospect. Past RORC Commodore, Andrew McIrvine and a team of 11 RORC members including current Commodore, Mike Greville, have chartered the 145ft Windrose.

The multihull record for the RORC Caribbean 600 has not been beaten since the inaugural race in 2009. The 63′ Trimaran, Paradox, skippered by Olivier Vigoureux says the six crew on board are out to ‘beat the current record’. The American, French and British crew members have raced in the Figaro Race, Transat Jacques Vabres, America’s Cup and Mini Transat.

Anders Nordquist’s Swan 90, Nefertiti, has an international crew including Rolex Middle Sea Race winner, Christian Ripard from Malta. They should have a close battle with Wendy Schmidt’s Swan 80, Selene, and Irish entry, RP78, Whisper.

There are a huge variety of yachts racing in IRC One, including Hound, skippered by Hound from Maine USA. The 60′ classic will be competing in the Caribbean 600 for the first time with a family crew of avid racers. Hound has competed in the last 8 Newport-Bermuda races, winning her class twice.

Ondeck’s 40.7 Spirit of Venus is chartered to the Royal Armoured Corp Offshore Racing Team. The majority of the 11 strong crew are part of the Challenger 2 Main Battle Tank Regiment which returned from Afghanistan last spring.

Lt Col Paul Macro RTR: “Soldiers have to work together as a team, under time pressure, when cold, wet and tired, in difficult and even dangerous conditions. The adventurous team spirit required by a successful offshore racing crew is the same as that required by the crew of a tank or any other armoured vehicle.”

There are four Class40s competing. Close duels are expected right through the fleet, but a hard fought and close encounter is expected in this class. Trade wind sailing provides perfect conditions for Class40s, with long reaches and downwind legs, these pocket rockets are capable of surfing at speeds of up to 25 knots. Class40s from America, Austria, France and Great Britain are taking on the 600 mile Caribbean odyssey; Tim Fetch’s Icarus Racing, Christophe Coatnoan’s Partouche, Andreas Hanakamp’s Vaquita and Peter Harding’s 40 Degrees, co-skippered by Hannah Jenner. The Class40s will be level-racing under their own rules. First to finish will claim the Concise Trophy; a full barrel of English Harbour rum.

IRC Two includes the smallest yacht in the fleet, Bernie Evan-Wong’s Mumm 36, High Tension. Antiguan dentist, Bernie has competed in all four RORC Caribbean 600 races, however last year, High Tension did not finish the race.

“It is definitely a case of unfinished business,” said Bernie. “We have actually used our downfall to modify the rig, so we have made something good out of the incident. Like many Antiguans, I am amazed how this race has developed since 2009, I have been sailing in the Caribbean for over 50 years and what has been really missing is a well-run, exciting offshore race. The RORC Caribbean 600 has provided that and made my dreams come true.”

 

Icarus Racing (Photo by George Bekris)

Icarus Racing (Photo by George Bekris)

One Of The Classes Starting In Newport Bermuda Race 2008 (Photo by George Bekris)

One Of The Classes Starting In Newport Bermuda Race 2008 (Photo by George Bekris)

 

 There are many ways to watch the Friday afternoon start in Newport. The shore-side view is spectacular and comfortable.  Many people watch the start from Castle Hill, right at the start of Ocean Drive.  Others watch from the Jamestown shore, where the best viewing is at Fort Wetherill State Park.  Beavertail State Park in Jamestown is also an option, but a little further away from the line.
 
A variety of vessels are available for charter in Newport.  If you visit the various Newport web sites dedicated to tourism and business, you will find many listed. Numerous tourist vessels take visitors out on the water for tours, and a number of these may have special trips available specifically to watch the start of the race.  Again, check the many tourist web sites for Newport.
 
Hundreds of private yachts spend the afternoon watching the start.  Joining a friend or family member who has a boat in Newport and plans to be on the water for the day is a great way to see the race.
 
During the race, digital spectators can watch the progress of the race on their computers by logging on to iBoattrack through the Newport Bermuda Race web site www.bermudarace.com/ or through iBoat’s own web http://www.iboattrack.com/

Down in Bermuda, the best spot to watch the yachts finish in Bermuda is from the grounds of St. David’s Lighthouse. Visitors will find that the Finish Line Committee is very hospitable and depending on the finishing traffic, they may be invited up into the tower for a tour. It is a straight up climb and not for people afraid of heights. The view from the lawn is almost as good and worth the trip to St. David’s.

The HD Gateway Finish Line Cam is new for 2010.  From the high definition camera mounted on the St. David’s Lighthouse tower, finish line action will be streamed worldwide 24/7. Spectators can use iBoattrack to follow their boat of interest to the finish, then actually watch them cross the line when they arrive.

In Bermuda, digital spectators can watch boats finish from the comfort of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club. A Gateway ‘SMART Board’ will be available for viewing in the Calabash Lounge and a smaller HD TV monitor will be available over the Terrace Bar.

 by Talbot Wilson

New Bermuda Race Entrants

Yacht  Yacht Type  Division  Captain 
ANGEL  Ctm 84  CD  Edward T. Anderson 
ATALANTA  Little Harbor 54  CD  James F. Volkwein 
ATTITUDE  Beneteau 423  CD  Shawn Dahlen 
AVATAR  Ranger 37  CD  Janusz Kedzierski 
BERMUDA OYSTER  Oyster 435  CD  Paul B. Hubbard 
BLE U C&C 51xl  CD  Dan Epstein 
BLUEBIRD  Migrant 45 Ketch  CD  Harry Bird 
BONSPIEL  Nordic 44  CD  James J. Richter 
CADENCE  Apogee 50  CD  R. David Warters 
CETACEA  Hinckley 59  CD  Christopher J. Culver 
CHECKMATE  Alden44  CD  Frank J. Flores 
CLOVER III  Swan 56  CD  Neal F. Finnegan 
CONVERGENCE  Jeanneau 43 DS  CD  James Linsley 
EAGLE  J-40  CD  Dana Oviatt 
ECLIPSE  Hinckley 59  CD  Barbara & Robert Cavanagh 
FOX  Swan 53  CD  Ruth M. Pecherek 
FREEDOM  Sabre 452  CD  Cary W. Thomson 
HAERLEM  Swan 55  CD  Hendrikus (Henk) P L Wisker 
I’LL THINK ABOUT IT  Beneteau 523  CD  Marc Tandourjian 
ISOLA  Baltic 52  CD  Howard M. Eisenberg 
KALUE  Wooden Ketch  CD  Rudy Schreiber 
LAURA B  Island Packet 45  CD  Joseph R. Triggs, Jr. 
LIBERTY CALL  HR 43  CD  Matthew G. Pilon 
LILLA  CNB 76  CD  Simon M. De Pietro 
MANANA  Swan 48  CD  Michhael V. Johnson 
MISTY  Little Harbor 54  CD  Eric G. Thorkilsen 
NIRVANA  Maxi 80  CD  Charles F Kiefer III 
NOSTOS  Alden 44  CD  Lorenzo D. Weisman 
NOVA  Swan 56  CD  Mark DiStefano 
PILGRIM  Alden 44  CD  Mark Rice 
POESKE  First 42  CD  Richard Donn 
RESTIVE  Alden48 Ctm  CD  George P Denny III 
RUTAINE  C&C 37/40+  CD  David P. McLoughlin 
SCEPTRED ISLE  Ctm 63  CD  Rex G. Herbert 
SHEARWATER  Morris 40  CD  Conrad Hall 
SHINDIG  Pearson 39-2  CD  Kevin G. Flannery 
TEMPTRESS  IMX-45  CD  Arent H Kits van Heyningen 
WHISKEY GIRL  Hinckley 70  CD  Michael McAllister 
WINDWALKER II  Lyman Morse 60  CD  Daniel Levangie 
ALIBI  J-120  DH  Gardner L. Grant, Jr. 
BOLANDS MILL  Class 40  DH  John Ryan 
CHOUCAS  Jeanneau SF36  DH  Frederic Cosandey 
CORDELIA  Valiant 42  DH  Roy F. Greenwald 
CUTLASS  Class 40  DH  Alex / Nick Mehran / Halmos 
DAWN TREADER  Swan 48 MK II  DH  Lawrence G. Cohen 
DELAWANA  Swan 51  DH  Hans F. Himmelman 
DIRIGO  C&C 41  DH  Eric M. Johnson 
DRAGON  Class 40  DH  Michael S. Hennessy 
ESMERALDE  Sabre 386  DH  Bruce R. Beard, Jr. 
GREAT SCOT  J-35  DH  Darren T Garnier 
HERON  J-120  DH  Greg R. Leonard 
KAMOA’E  Class 40  DH  Eric Lecoq 
KILLUA  Aphrodite 101  DH  James G. Binch 
KIVA  Hinkley SW51CB  DH  Mark Stevens 
LORA ANN  Express 37  DH  Richard T. du Moulin 
MIREILLE  J-120  DH  Edwin Gaynor 
NEXT BOAT  Morris 45  DH  Mark Ellman 
OCEAN WANDERER1  Montivideo 43  DH  Erwin Wanderer 
PALADIN  J-35  DH  Jason A Richter 
PLUM CRAZY  Sabre MK II  DH  Michael R. Berg 
RESOLUTE  J/122  DH  D. Scott Miller 
SEABISCUIT  J-46  DH  Nathan C. Owen 
SIR EDMUND  Ctm 49  DH  Fredrick R. Holt 
TOOTHFACE  Akilaria Class40  DH  Michael W. Dreese 
WHISPER  Hinckley 48  DH  Thomas J. Vander Salm 
BEAU GESTE  Farr 80  GHL  Karl Kwok 
BELLA MENTE  Mini Maxi  GHL  Hap Fauth 
CAPTIVITY  Farr 60  GHL  Samuel T. Byrne 
CATAPULT RACING  SouthernCross 52  GHL  Marc Glimcher 
HOI AN  Custom 50  GHL  Heilner Marc 
NATALIE J  TP52  GHL  Philip D. O’Niel III, D.D.S. 
NOONMARK VI  Swan 56  GHL  Sir Geoffrey Mulcahy 
RAMBLER  Ctm 90  GHL  George David 
RAN  JV 72  GHL  Niklas Zennstrom 
RIMA2  R/P 55  GHL  John Brim 
SNOW LION  Ker 50  GHL  Lawrence S. Huntington 
TITAN 15  ctm75  GHL  Tom Hill, Mr. 
VELA VELOCE  Southern Cross  GHL  Richard H Oland 
GENUINE RISK  Dubois 90  Open  Mark E / USMMA Watson III 
ILMOSTRO  VOR70  Open  Ken Read 
SPEEDBOAT  Maxi  Open  Alex Jackson 
ACTAEA  Hinckley B40  SDL  Michael M. Cone 
AKELA III  Swan 43  SDL  Djoerd Hoekstra 
AKUBRA  J44  SDL  Reginald H. Goodday Dr. 
AMADEUS  IMX-40  SDL  Jack R. Yaissle 
AMERICAN GIRL  King 40  SDL  Daniel Galyon 
AMIGO VI  J-42  SDL  Bernie P. Coyne 
APSARA  J-109  SDL  Mike Sleightholme 
ARBELLA  First 44.7  SDL  James P. Shaughnesy 
AURORA  Tartan 41  SDL  Andrew F. Kallfelz 
AURORA  Reichel/Pugh 66  SDL  Gus Carlson 
AVENIR  C&C 41  SDL  Joseph T. Murray 
AVRA  J/120 Mod  SDL  George Petrides 
BABE  Swan 46  SDL  Colin E. Couper MD 
BACCI  Swan 53  SDL  Lorenzo Vascotto 
BARLEYCORN  NYYC Swan 42  SDL  Brendan J. Brownyard 
BEAGLE  J-44  SDL  Philip H. Gutin 
BEAUSOLEIL  Beneteau 456SD  SDL  Richard A Parent 
BELLE AURORE  Cal 40  SDL  R Douglas Jurrius 
BIG BOOTY  Lutra 42  SDL  Patrick Eudy 
BOMBARDINO  Santa Cruz 52  SDL  James W. Sykes 
BRAND NEW DAY  J-65  SDL  James C. Madden 
BUZZ  Sydney 38  SDL  Richard E. Stevenson, Jr 
CARINA  CTM 48  SDL  Rives Potts 
CHARLIE V  J-44  SDL  Norman H. Schulman MD 
CILISTA  J-130  SDL  Jeffrey L. Eberle 
CONVICTUS MAXIMUS  Farr IRC 42  SDL  Donald W. Nicholson 
CYBELE  IMX-45  SDL  Richard M. Burnes, Jr 
CYGNETTE  Swan 441  SDL  William J. Mayer 
DENALI  Nelson Marek 70  SDL  Michael A. D’Amelio 
DOGSLED  Kaufman 47  SDL  Todd F. Barnard 
DOLPHIN  J-42  SDL  Henry S. Morgan 
DONNYBROOK  Ctm Sloop  SDL  James P. Muldoon 
FEARLESS  Farr 395 OD  SDL  Shaun J. Ensor 
FINESSE  J-42  SDL  Newton P.S. Merrill 
FLIRT  Navy 44 MK1  SDL  US NAVAL ACADEMY 
FLYING GOOSE  Ctm 56  SDL  Daniel C. van Starrenburg 
FROLIC  Sabre 362  SDL  Peter G. Brown 
GLORY  J-44  SDL  Jack Neades/ USCGA 
GOLD DIGGER  J-44  SDL  James D. Bishop 
GONE WITH THE WIND  Cal 40  SDL  William M. LeRoy 
GRACIE  Ctm 69  SDL  Stephan A. & Simon W Frank 
GREY MATTER  Hanse 470e  SDL  Brian R. Parselle 
GREYGHOST  Zaal 38  SDL  Philip W. Parish 
HAKUNA MATATA  Cal 39  SDL  Christopher J. Andrews 
HIGH NOON  Tripp 41  SDL  Colin Rath 
HIRO MARU  Swan 43 Classic  SDL  Hiroshi Nakajima 
HOUND  Ctm 60  SDL  Eberhart Frank 
INVICTUS  TP52  SDL  US Naval Academy 
JACKNIFE  J-133  SDL  Andrew Hall 
JACQUELINE IV  Hinckley SW42  SDL  Robert S. Forman, Jr 
JADE  J-42  SDL  Robert W. Thuss, Jr. 
KALEVALA II  Grand Soleil 37  SDL  Tapio O. Saavalainen 
KODIAK  Swan 601  SDL  E. Llwyd Ecclestone 
LAPIN  Benn Frst 40.7  SDL  Christopher Clark 
LINDY  Peterson 38  SDL  David G. Dickerson 
MAGIC  Santa Cruz 52  SDL  Kenneth Laudon 
MERLIN  Swan57  SDL  John H Duerden 
MISCHIEVOUS  Ctm 65  SDL  Albert J. Fitzgibbons 
MISTY  J-40 WK  SDL  Fred A. Allardyce 
MOJOE  Peterson 43  SDL  Joseph M. Naroski 
MORGAN OF MARIETTA  Centurion 42  SDL  Colin G Golder 
NASTY MEDICINE  Corby 41.5  SDL  Stephen J. Sherwin MD 
RAGANA  Cape Fear 38R  SDL  Darius Peleda 
RAINMAKER  Swan40  SDL  Kenneth P. Hylwa Mr. 
REGATTA  CARTER41  SDL  Constantine G. Koste 
REINDEER  Morris 47  SDL  Peter/Tony Driscoll/Parker 
RELATIVITY  Beneteau 53F5  SDL  Hall Palmer 
RESOLUTE  J-44 WK  SDL  Fred Madeira 
RICOCHET  J-120  SDL  USCGA 
ROCKET SCIENCE  J-120  SDL  Rick F. Oricchio 
RUNAWAY  J-44  SDL  Lawrence R. Glenn 
SAILOR BANDIDO  Quest 33  SDL  Christopher A. Palabrica 
SARAH  X-41  SDL  Gregory B. Manning 
SFORZANDO  Ker 55  SDL  Clayton G. Deutsch 
SHINNECOCK  J-120  SDL  James C. Praley 
SINN FEIN  Cal 40  SDL  Peter S. Rebovich, Sr. 
SIRENA BELLA  J44  SDL  Joe Murli 
SIRENSONG  J-133  SDL  Thomas J Carroll 
SLIDE RULE  First 44.7  SDL  Scott Bearse 
SPIRIT  Baltic 38DP  SDL  A. John Gregg 
STAR CHASER  Swan 51  SDL  Wijnand (Boogie) van den Boogaard 
STARLIGHT  Simonis Voogd 56  SDL  Michael Dybvik 
SWIFT  Navy 44 MK1  SDL  US Naval Academy 
TEMPTATION  Taylor 45  SDL  Arthur & Peter Santry 
TERRAPIN  Beneteau 40.7  SDL  Jonathan Litt 
THEJACKAL  Beneteau 40.7  SDL  John DeFilippo 
THREEBEANS  Santa Cruz 37  SDL  Christopher Rosow 
TIGER  Swan 46  SDL  Thomas & Nancy Grieb 
TRIPLE LINDY  Swan 44 MK II  SDL  Joseph Mele 
TRUE  J-42 (mod)  SDL  Howard B. Hodgson, Jr. 
UPGRADE  Farr 395  SDL  Peter Gibbons-Neff 
VALKYRIE  First 44.7  SDL  David Andril 
VAMP  J-44  SDL  Leonard J. Sitar 
VANQUISH  STP 65  SDL  Rego / Riker Lucas / USMMA 
VORTICES  J 145  SDL  Christopher L Saxton 
WAZIMO  Aerodyne 38  SDL  W. Barrett Holby, Jr. 
WESTRAY  Concordia 39  SDL  John D. Melvin 
WHISPER  Canning 48  SDL  Sheldon Brotman 
WHITE RHINO  Swan 56  SDL  Todd Stuart 
WINDBORN  J-120  SDL  Richard W. Born 
XCELSIOR  IMX-45  SDL  Alice O. Martin 
XENOPHON  Swan 44 MKII  SDL  Jeffrey V. Rabuffo, MD 
ZEST  Hinckley SW42  SDL  Brian E. Swiggett 
ZWERVER  S&S 57′ Berm Cut  SDL  Frans van Schaik 

The above list subject to change.

 

For More Photos of the Newport bermuda Race 2008 by George Bekris click  HERE

Newport Bermuda Race 2008 (Photo by George Bekris )

Newport Bermuda Race 2008 (Photo by George Bekris )

 From the June 18th start in Newport to finish in Bermuda 635 miles later, this classic ocean race is almost a spectator sport.

Ranger Upwind Sailing (Photo By George Bekris)

Ranger Upwind Sailing (Photo By George Bekris)

After all was said and done, it was the J-Class Ranger  that took the 2010 Bucket.  John Williams and his crew raced consistently and well, earning a well-deserved victory.   Second place belonged to the the Perini Navi Andromeda la Dea, with the Perini Navi P2 in third place overall.

The third and final race of the 2010 St. Barths Bucket (the “Wrong Way Around” course) was sailed in conditions very similar to the previous days: fluky winds in the 10 to 15 knot range.  The usual noon start was preceded by a couple of Bucket Scholarship holders, thus spoiling Gloria’s virtual deadlock on the Escargot Cup, which was awarded to the consistently sailed Toto.  P2 and Unfurled earned second and third place in the Gazelle fleet, while Axia and Hetairos were runners up in the Grande Dames contingent. 

It would be a mere redundancy to add that the sailing and the shore side activities were of the customary caliber, with Visione a hands-down winner of the yacht open house on Friday night — after all the rest of the fleet had closed she kept the party going until midnight!  We expected marvelous sailing (this is, after all, the Caribbean) and indeed we got it.  The combination of St. Barths, 39 megayachts, and the blue skies and waters worked their usual magic!

As Tony Hambrook, Managing Director of Alloy Yacht stated, “This was the best regatta ever, anywhere!”

Results: Race 3 

 
Race 3
Points
Finish Time
Time Delta
   
ANDROMEDA LA DEA
1
3:21:25 PM
0:00:00
RIELA
2
3:24:27 PM
0:03:02
HELIOS
3
3:25:10 PM
0:03:45
METEOR
4
3:26:06 PM
0:04:41
ANTARA
5
3:28:03 PM
0:06:38
AVALON
6
3:29:38 PM
0:08:13
GEORGIA
7
3:30:50 PM
0:09:25
GLORIA
8
3:33:16 PM
0:11:51
DSK
9
3:37:26 PM
0:16:01
RANGER
10
3:37:42 PM
0:16:17
REBECCA
11
3:38:49 PM
0:17:24
LIARA
12
3:39:29 PM
0:18:04
UNFURLED
13
3:39:43 PM
0:18:18
SALUTE
14
3:40:22 PM
0:18:57
HIGHLAND BREEZE
15
3:40:45 PM
0:19:20
P2
16
3:41:15 PM
0:19:50
VARSOVIE
17
3:41:16 PM
0:19:51
SALPERTON IV
18
3:42:01 PM
0:20:36
WHITE WINGS
19
3:42:11 PM
0:20:46
AXIA
20
3:43:18 PM
0:21:53
SOJANA
21
3:44:56 PM
0:23:31
WHISPER
22
3:46:17 PM
0:24:52
GANESHA
23
3:47:35 PM
0:26:10
VISIONE
24
3:47:58 PM
0:26:33
GHOST
25
3:48:31 PM
0:27:06
ADELA
26
3:48:43 PM
0:27:18
HANUMAN
27
3:48:44 PM
0:27:19
SAUDADE
28
3:48:56 PM
0:27:31
MYSTERY**
29
3:49:04 PM
0:27:39
ARTEMIS
30
3:49:39 PM
0:28:14
WINDCREST
31
3:50:33 PM
0:29:08
HETAIROS
32
3:52:05 PM
0:30:40
SHAMOUN
33
3:52:26 PM
0:31:01
HYPERION
34
3:53:45 PM
0:32:20
DESTINATION
35
3:53:50 PM
0:32:25
HAMILTON II
36
3:53:59 PM
0:32:34
SYMMETRY
37
4:01:29 PM
0:40:04
TOTO
38
4:33:55 PM
1:12:30
BARACUDA
39
DNF
 

* Safety Penalty: 5 Minute
** Over Early Penalty: 5 Minute

Results: Cumulative

 
Race 1
Points
Race 2
Points
Race 3
Points
Total
Points
 Rank
RANGER
13
1
10
24
1
ANDROMEDA LA DEA
4
26
1
31
2
P2
10
5
16
31
3
AXIA
3
11
20
34
4
UNFURLED
19
4
13
36
5
GANESHA
7
10
23
40
6
GEORGIA
9
25
7
41
7
AVALON
5
31
6
42
8
REBECCA
30
2
11
43
9
SAUDADE
8
8
28
44
10
DSK
20
15
9
44
11
SALUTE
2
29
14
45
12
GHOST
17
3
25
45
13
HANUMAN
12
6
27
45
14
WHITE WINGS
6
20
19
45
15
HETAIROS
1
13
32
46
16
HELIOS
24
23
3
50
17
ANTARA
11
34
5
50
18
RIELA
16
35
2
53
19
WINDCREST
14
9
31
54
20
LIARA
28
14
12
54
21
VISIONE
26
7
24
57
22
SOJANA
29
12
21
62
23
ADELA
18
19
26
63
24
HAMILTON II
15
16
36
67
25
WHISPER
23
22
22
67
26
VARSOVIE
34
17
17
68
27
METEOR
36
33
4
73
28
SALPERTON IV
27
28
18
73
29
HIGHLAND BREEZE
32
27
15
74
30
HYPERION
22
18
34
74
31
MYSTERY
25
21
29
75
32
BARACUDA
21
24
40
85
33
GLORIA
39
39
8
86
34
ARTEMIS
33
32
30
95
35
SHAMOUN
35
30
33
98
36
DESTINATION
31
36
35
102
37
SYMMETRY
37
38
37
112
38
TOTO
38
37
38
113
39

 

A full recap of the St. Barths Bucket and Race Information about the Upcoming Newport Bucket Regatta is available at  www.bucketregattas.com

  
Ranger Head On (Photo by George Bekris)

Ranger Head On (Photo by George Bekris)

 

J-Class Ranger (Photo by George Bekris)

J-Class Ranger (Photo by George Bekris)

 

Who would have guessed that all those navigating fluid libations we so freely poured to Poseidon a few years back (in the days of windless Buckets) would bear compounded interest.  Once again — we sailed in near perfect conditions, under proper Caribbean blue skies.  The word “near” is used advisedly, as the day saw wind speeds ranging from 8 to 15 knots, with direction swings from SE to NE.  This, needless to say, scrambled some otherwise predictable finishes and may well have been a cause of some frustration. 

The 39 yachts were sent off in close formation, with tight starts sometimes a mere 30 seconds apart.  The traditional second day “Wiggley Course” was revised into the “Not So Wiggley” course in the interest of safety, although the dramatic wind shifts reintroduced some of the Wiggles back into the equation. 

In the end it looked like a photo finish between Ranger and Rebecca until the latter hit a wall in the form of a massive header, allowing Ranger claim a well deserved first place.  Some liberal interpretations of the safety protocol for finishing yachts provided some interesting finishing tactics, although good general seamanship avoided any potential problems. 

The traditional owners’ party was again held at the Carl Gustaf Hotel which offered a beautiful view of the fleet below, followed by general merriment on the quay.  Sunday’s race, the “Wrong Way Around” course, promises to enjoy more good weather and lovely sailing for all.

Results: Cumulative

 
Race 1
Points
Race 2
Points
Race 3
Points
Total
Points
 Rank
RANGER
13
1
 
14
1
HETAIROS
1
13
 
14
2
AXIA
3
11
 
14
3
P2
10
5
 
15
4
SAUDADE
8
8
 
16
5
GANESHA
7
10
 
17
6
HANUMAN
12
6
 
18
7
GHOST
17
3
 
20
8
UNFURLED
19
4
 
23
9
WINDCREST
14
9
 
23
10
WHITE WINGS
6
20
 
26
11
ANDROMEDA LA DEA
4
26
 
30
12
SALUTE
2
29
 
31
13
HAMILTON II *
15
16
 
31
14
REBECCA
30
2
 
32
15
VISIONE
26
7
 
33
16
GEORGIA
9
25
 
34
17
DSK
20
15
 
35
18
AVALON
5
31
 
36
19
ADELA
18
19
 
37
20
HYPERION*
22
18
 
40
21
SOJANA
29
12
 
41
22
LIARA
28
14
 
42
23
ANTARA
11
34
 
45
24
BARACUDA
21
24
 
45
25
WHISPER
23
22
 
45
26
MYSTERY
25
21
 
46
27
HELIOS
24
23
 
47
28
RIELA
16
35
 
51
29
VARSOVIE
34
17
 
51
30
SALPERTON IV
27
28
 
55
31
HIGHLAND BREEZE*
32
27
 
59
32
SHAMOUN
35
30
 
65
33
ARTEMIS
33
32
 
65
34
DESTINATION
31
36
 
67
35
METEOR
36
33
 
69
36
TOTO
38
37
 
75
37
SYMMETRY **
37
38
 
75
38
GLORIA
39
39
 
78
39

* Safety Penalty: 5 Minute
** Over Early Penalty: 5 Minute