Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 - Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

The Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT sailed by Francis Joyon, Clément Surtel, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Gwénolé Gahinet and Sébastien Audigane won the Jules Verne Trophy, the outright round the world sailing record, this morning.

They crossed the finish at 0749hrs UTC on Thursday 26th January 2017.
Francis Joyon and his crew sailed the 22,461 theoretical miles in 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds, at an average speed of 22.84 knots.
Out on the water, they actually sailed 26,412 miles at an average speed of 26.85 knots.
They shattered the previous record set by Loïck Peyron and the crew of the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V by 4 days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 23 seconds.
During this round the world voyage, they smashed no fewer than six intermediate records at Cape Leeuwin, off Tasmania, on the International Date Line, at Cape Horn, at the Equator and off Ushant.

 

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT, Skipper Francis Joyon and his crew, prior to their Jules Verne Trophy record attempt, crew circumnavigation, in Brest on November 20, 2016 - Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT, Skipper Francis Joyon and his crew, prior to their Jules Verne Trophy record attempt, crew circumnavigation, in Brest on November 20, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI

Francis Joyon and his crew of five took the decision yesterday morning to turn back after six days of sailing in their attempt at the round the world record. Aboard IDEC SPORT, they are heading for Brest to await a better opportunity to conquer the Jules Verne Trophy.

After what was a more than satisfying start until the Cape Verde Islands, the maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT found herself taken prisoner in the Doldrums, which were very active and expanding in front of them. Even experienced sailors like Francis Joyon, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella and Boris Herrmann were surprised by the situation.

Francis Joyon looks back at this episode for us. “Aboard the red and grey bird, we are approaching the Doldrums feeling upbeat after these first few days at sea. We’re on schedule and our virtual rival is alongside us on the tracker. The weather models and satellite photos indicate a fairly rapid crossing of the 200 miles separating the winds in the North and South Atlantic. We’re entering a zone of leaden skies and heavy rain, but feeling quietly confident.”

“If you total up the experience of the six of us, you’re looking at several dozen crossings of this zone. But it is hell out here with rain that is getting heavier and heavier leaving several centimetres of water on the deck, while the skies are so black that it’s like night. Sudden violent gusts hit us, and we have to sail downwind for a few minutes before finding the sails flapping with no wind at all.”

Under full sail in the dark just to get out of there
“That was just the introduction to the thirty hours that would follow. I can remember one particular moment at night with Alex at the helm under full mainsail and big gennaker, when we were forced to run downwind in 40 knots of wind. This wasn’t one big gust, but wind that lasted a fairly long time, to the extent that we wondered how long it would be before the boat capsized if it got any worse. Under full sail in the dark with sails wide open, we sped along in the dark without paying attention to the route, just to get away from the worst. Last time Alex found himself in such a situation, aboard a MOD70 a few months ago, (Musandam Oman Sail – Transat Quebec/Saint-Malo, editor’s note), the wind proved too strong for the boat to keep her balance and she suddenly went over with Alex trapped under the net. It was a very lucky escape for him and this experience has strengthened his courage. Then, there were the calms with the trimaran drifting at 1 knot, a snail’s pace.”

Heading north to Brittany for another start
“The skipper’s mood sank as did that of the crew that are usually so upbeat. We saw the hours slipping by. Hours when we should have been hopping onto a low a long way south, which was heading for the Cape of Good Hope without us. The following morning we should have been in the SE’ly trade winds, but it was too late. The stopwatch, usually on our side, was against us, so all we could do was head north to go back across the Doldrums and towards Brittany to give it another go later. There’s no getting away from the Doldrums…”

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 - Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

It was at 21:14:45 UTC on Sunday 20th November that Francis Joyon and his crew crossed the start line for the Jules Verne Trophy, the outright round the world sailing record, on IDEC SPORT.  “All we can see is the Créac’h Lighthouse. It’s pitch black. But we have the impression that this is the start of something big,” commented Francis Joyon, the skipper of IDEC SPORT, who was in a hurry not to avoid the weather opportunity ahead of the bows of the 31m long trimaran.

24 knots crossing the line

Francis Joyon, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella, Gwénolé Gahinet, Clément Surtel and Boris Herrmann left the harbour in Brest shortly before 1845 UTC. They had intended to wait a while in the light airs at the centre of the low before making the most of some powerful and favourable winds generated to the west of this system. The weather however meant they did not have to remain patient for long, as they ended up crossing the line much earlier than scheduled. This commando force of exceptional sailors set off on Sunday to break the record, propelled along at 24 knots after a change of headsail over the line between the Le Créac’h lighthouse on Ushant and The Lizard at the SW tip of Britain.

The situation is very unusual for a record attempt and this is a first for Francis Joyon. The voyage is beginning with light airs, but northerly gales are on their way to the tip of Brittany. This is the system that Francis and his router, Marcel van Triest have been looking at. The skipper hopes to pick up these winds later this Monday morning to speed across the Bay of Biscay and get to the trade winds off Portugal and the Canaries without hitch.

The first few hours were more of a slow trot as they make their way across a ridge, where there are light winds and calms. So the maxi trimaran is practically stopped waiting for the big blow to head towards the SW. As usual, the sea state will determine how fast they can go. The storms which swept across Western France this weekend led to a heavy swell, but this has eased and is in the same direction as the wind, so it should not be too much of a problem for the multihull.

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT, Skipper Francis Joyon and his crew, prior to their Jules Verne Trophy record attempt, crew circumnavigation, in Brest on November 20, 2016 - Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT, Skipper Francis Joyon and his crew, prior to their Jules Verne Trophy record attempt, crew circumnavigation, in Brest on November 20, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI

Same people to try again

After making an initial attempt last year and getting ever so close to the record, the crew of IDEC SPORT has set off in the same configuration as last time. There is no point in changing such a fantastic combination. To smash the record set by Loïck Peyron and his crew of thirteen dating back to January 2012 and see his name in the record books for the eighth time, Francis Joyon along with his crew of five must return to cross this same line between Brittany and Cornwall by 10:56:38 UTC on 5th January 2017.

Gwenole Gahinet portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Gwenole Gahinet portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Clement Surtel portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Clement Surtel portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

xxxx portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

xxxx portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Bernard Stamm portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Bernard Stamm portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

xxxx portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

xxxx portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Alex Pella portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Alex Pella portrait, crew member of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

 

Francis Joyon portrait, skipper of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Francis Joyon portrait, skipper of IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 13, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

TROPHEE JULES VERNE

 

Francis Joyon on IDEC SPORT (Photo courtesy IDEC SPORT)

Francis Joyon on IDEC SPORT (Photo © IDEC Sport)

December 9th, 2015

The happy faces on the sailors during this morning’s video conference live from IDEC SPORT were a pleasure to see. Francis Joyon’s crew is in the process of seeing their gamble pay off and ending up on the right side of the area of low pressure coming down from Madagascar. The big, red trimaran is smoking: 450 miles regained in two and a half days.

Less than 350 miles behind the record pace in comparison with 800 on Sunday, IDEC SPORT is clocking up the miles at very high speed. Deep in the Southern Ocean, Francis Joyon and his crew of five have put their foot down, clearly stating their goal: to attempt to stay above 30 knots for as long as possible and weave their way around the Great Circle Route low down in the Furious Fifties between 52 and 54 degrees south.

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT in the Indian Ocean (Photo © IDEC Sport)

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT in the Indian Ocean (Photo © IDEC Sport)

As fast as possible on the shortest route
This is not some miracle that has suddenly happened, but the result of a carefully thought out strategy developed with their onshore router, Marcel van Triest. According to him, the risk of encountering icebergs is not as great as 48 hours ago, when a 150m long monster was spotted on the radar. The race track looks clearer now and they can get the speed back up.
So they are on the attack, sailing as fast as possible on the shortest route, even if this means diving down to where no multihull has gone during such a record attempt. Yesterday evening, IDEC SPORT gybed at 54°31 south, after passing to the south of the volcanic Heard Island. “It’s a snow-capped volcano, which is still active. We hoped to see the smoke, but we didn’t get to see anything,” said Francis Joyon. Marcel Van Triest – with five round the world voyages under his belt – remembers that during the first Whitbread and Vendée Globe races, when there were no Ice Gates, a few monohulls sailed as far down. But no multihulls. So, in short, this is a long way south and it is very cold. Outside, your hands and face freeze, and they have to change over at the helm very often, sometimes every half hour. Inside the boat, in spite of the very basic heater, fitted above all to get rid of some of the dampness, it is between 6 and 8 degrees. However, in spite of the harsh conditions, the sailors on IDEC SPORT have a smile on their face. A beaming smile, as it looks like after their hard efforts, their gamble has paid off.
On the right side of the Low
The race against the area of low pressure is being won. That’s today’s good news, as Francis Joyon explained, “The area of low pressure has slowed down, while we managed to go faster than expected, so things are looking up. We are in with a very good chance of making it to the other side of this tropical low.” To be more precise about the movement of the low, it is expected to move behind them on Thursday evening. “Unless they have a major technical problem, they should get ahead, and that is almost certain now,” declared Marcel Van Triest this afternoon.
Francis Joyon added, laughing, “In any case, we have to pull this one off, as otherwise Bernard (Stamm) has threatened to turn us around and come back!” The Swiss sailor made it clear he was joking and that he won’t need to carry out his threat anyhow, as the boat is sailing at 100% of her potential… and the sailors are feeling very upbeat today. In two and a half days, the troops on the red boat have cut their deficit in comparison to the record pace in half, regaining 450 miles. Around a thousand miles from the longitude of Cape Leeuwin that they are expecting to cross early on Friday morning, they are now only 350 miles behind the record run.
450 miles regained
It is true that they are not going to be able to keep on making such gains and at some point in a few days from now, they are going to have to climb back up to fifty degrees south, if we look at the weather charts. But they have already accomplished something. While the end of last week was difficult in terms of the numbers, the start of this week has been very positive and exciting. “When we are at the helm, we remain focused and the goal is to keep up a good VMG, with a compromise between speed and bearing,” the German sailor, Boris Herrmann explained. He went on to talk about the food they were getting on board. In general, they have all they require, but the freeze-dried stuff doesn’t taste that good “while the bits of ham that Bernard prepared are well received.”
Gwénolé Gahinet, the youngest member of the crew and a rookie as far as the Southern Ocean is concerned, feels positive too. Apart from his obvious talents as a sailor, he has also been using software to identify sea birds to teach the crew about what they can see. “Here, under the protection, it’s a bit like a gathering in the pub,” joked Francis Joyon during the live link-up, encouraging his crewmen to take the microphone. It shows what the master of IDEC SPORT is like. He willingly shares the microphone and his experience of adventures at sea. This adventure is up there with the best. The boat is at 100% of her ability, the weather strategy has worked out (more gybes at 1200 and 1400hrs UTC), high speeds and all clear ahead… all the lights are on green for the big red boat.
In short

After 17 and a half days at sea, at 1430hrs UTC on Wednesday 9th December, IDEC SPORT is sailing at 31.4 knots at 53°55 south and 87°46 east. Bearing: east (86°) 345 miles behind the record pace.
The crew
The international crew on IDEC SPORT includes just six men: Francis Joyon (FRA), Bernard Stamm (SUI), Gwénolé Gahinet (FRA), Alex Pella (ESP), Clément Surtel (FRA) and Boris Herrmann (GER)
Start
IDEC SPORT set off at 02:02:22 on Sunday 22nd November.
The time to beat
Loïck Peyron and his crew (Banque Populaire) with a time of 45 days, 13 hours, 42 minutes and 53 seconds.
Deadline
To smash the Jules Verne Trophy record, IDEC SPORT has to be back across the line before 1544hrs on Wednesday 6th January.
A peek on IDEC Sport (Photo © IDEC Sport)

A peek on IDEC Sport (Photo © IDEC Sport)

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening, prior to Their circumnavigation record Attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 14, 2015 - From left to right: skipper Francis Joyon, Roland Jourdain, Clement Surtel , Gwenole Gahinet Boris Herrmann, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella (Photo by Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening, prior to Their circumnavigation record Attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 14, 2015 – From left to right: skipper Francis Joyon, Roland Jourdain, Clement Surtel , Gwenole Gahinet Boris Herrmann, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella (Photo by Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

 

IDEC SPORT, the new maxi-trimaran, Francis Joyon, was baptized on Wednesday October 14 at La Trinité-sur-mer. The stand-by to try and beat the record for the Jules Verne Trophy starts in two weeks. Joyon took the opportunity to present its crew of five sailors, an onshore router, and an alternate. A very European commando mix of experience and youth was announced as well.  

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening with champagne by skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 14, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC - Patrice Lafargue (Pdt IDEC) and Professor Gerard Saillant

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening with champagne by skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 14, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC – Patrice Lafargue (Pdt IDEC) and Professor Gerard Saillant


A story of men …
After a month at the Multiplast yard in Vannes, IDEC SPORT was baptized on Wednesday on the pontoons from its home port: La Trinite-sur-Mer. It was Professor Gérard Saillant, co-founder of the Institute for Brain and Spinal Cord of (ICM), which is the sponsor of this new ride aboard which Francis Joyon and his men will leave in a few weeks at Conquest of the Planet. One goal: try to go round the world sailing in less than 45 days, which amounts to almost halve the clock imagined by Jules Verne for his hero Phileas Fogg …

Who are these men to whom Francis Joyon trusted?  Great sailors, half French, strangers to each other. A very international crew that combines experience and youth. “I only took the skippers,” said Francis to explain that the vessels need to know everything. All will be entrusted with the helm of the largest trimaran. “Unlike most teams provided where there are many specialized marine in one area, we will go with super-versatile aboard IDEC SPORT”. And for good reason: six on board is very little. Only the first winner of the Jules Verne Trophy, Bruno Peyron, had dared to start at five, that was in 1993. Since then, the crew on this record is always between 10 and 14 Marine … it will be necessarily a great human story that will write Francis Joyon and his men around the world this winter. These are men, three French, a Swiss, a Spaniard and a German.

Bernard Stamm Portrait crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Bernard Stamm (SUI) 51

No introduction of this specialist round the world, the only one of IDEC SPORT commando having already won the Jules Verne Trophy (in 2005 aboard the maxi-catamaran Orange 2). Bernard also won a whopping three round the world monohull Twice Around Alone solo and once the Barcelona World Race twice. He also participated three times in the Vendée Globe. This hard hyper talented evil brings its wealth of experience forged over 30 years on all the world’s oceans. Bernard Stamm: “Things have changed since my participation in the Jules Verne Trophy in 2005. The boats are different, the record is harder to take as well. But the principle is always the same: turn as fast as possible around the planet. I think the record is prenable, otherwise I would not be here! ”

 

 

 

 

Gwenole Gahinet portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Gwénolé Gahinet (FRA) 31

The youngest of the team is the son of a legend in ocean racing, alas disappeared: his father Gilles was one of the few to have beaten Eric Tabarly on Transat and have twice won the Solitaire du Figaro. It is also Figaro that “gweno” made a very grand entrance in recent years, winning great results after a first victory on the Mini Transat. Naval architecture engineer, the good head has worked in VPLP, the firm that designed IDEC SPORT. This is his first world tour. Youth, technical knowledge and talent are in his luggage. Gwénolé Gahinet: “I have a lot Orma trimaran sailed and Multi 50 but I still have much to learn about these great multihulls. I open eyes, I record everything. I am very motivated to discover the South Seas is a whole universe that makes you want to be discovered. ”

 

Alex Pella portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Alex Pella (ESP) 42

Born in Barcelona, ​​this dynamic Catalan was first excellent technical preparer giant multihulls – including The Race-before embarking on a remarkable career via the Mini 6.50 (2nd of the Transat), the Class40 (winner Route du Rhum) and everything that floats next big boats, on one or more shells. Fourth in the Barcelona World Race in 2011, he also sailed a lot in multihulls and knows the seas of the Great South. He knows everything. Alex Pella: “I did not hesitate a second when Francis contacted me for the Jules Verne Trophy. This is a great adventure, especially in this configuration with a small crew and boat prowled. This will be my second trip around the world and it will be two times faster than IMOCA 60. ”

 

Clement Surtel portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Clément Surtel (FRA) 36

Nephew of another great sailor – Franck Yves Escoffier– but especially passionate about multihulls, Clement has a huge experience of major general and trimarans IDEC SPORT in particular. He was preparer when it sailed into the hands of Franck Cammas. Besides multiple crews sailing in large (several records with Orange 2 of the Atlantic and including 24 hours), Clement has already participated in two onshore Jules Verne Trophy in 2005 and 2010. This time he sailed! He is very familiar with the boat and its skipper qualities addition, it will be a great help in all technical aspects. Clément Surtel: “I have spent years navigating these great multihulls and that’s it, I’ll have the chance to make my first world tour and getting into the deep end of the South Seas! IDEC is a beautiful SPORT Trusted platform that has been prepared to complete the course in less than 45 days. On board, we will be at the bottom, we’re off to a great transatlantic! ”

 

xxxx portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Boris Herrmann (GER) 34

Two world tours and three passages of Cape Horn: Boris Herrmann knows the great wide! It also comes to force the passage Northeast aboard the old IDEC now in the hands of the Chinese Guo Chuan browser. In 2009, he became the first German to win a round the world sailing: the Global Ocean Race. He too is a jack-of-all engineering, all small monohulls to multihulls giants, with great experience of hostility from the southern seas. It is German but it is a “Swiss Army knife” super versatile. Boris Herrmann: “For my third trip around the world, I am delighted to embark on this boat with which I have already sailed this year. Our motivation is very clear: we go to break the record! The next adventure is a plus, premium competition. ”

 

Roland Jourdain (FRA) 51 (replacing)

Great teams always have a luxury joker on the bench. Just in case … here “Bilou”, which will leave if by chance one of the five crew members was stopped in extremis. As Francis Joyon and Bernard Stamm, he is among those who needs no introduction. Heroes of the Vendée Globe, Le Figaro, the Route du Rhum and large multihulls, his enormous experience reassures everyone. Roland Jourdain: “I love being on the water and go further: the Jules Verne Trophy is a challenge that attracts me. I sailed a lot in multi this year. I will be very hot if Francis needs me. And if not, I will endure the guys from Earth. ”

Onshore router Marcel Van Triest (HOLL), 51

Since his den Balearic front of their computers day and night, Marcel Van Triest will be the IDEC SPORT weather guide. The “Flying Dutchman” is one of the best routers in the world. It’s also a great sailor, who has already done five times round the world race! His small annotated drawings will be scrutinized by Francis Joyon several times a day. It will at once try to beat his own record (Banque Populaire in 45 days and a half, it was him) and try to beat his colleague and friend Jean-Yves Bernot will be the Spindrift router 2, the competitor of IDEC SPORT on the Jules Verne Trophy. His extensive knowledge of ice in the south will also be a valuable asset.

Francis Joyon portrait, skipper of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Francis Joyon (FRA), 59: the boss

One sailor in the world to have held together the four largest ocean records alone (World Tour, Atlantic, 24 hours, Discovery Route), Francis Joyon thus passes crewed mode for this attempt, on a boat which he had long dreamed. After receiving dozens of candidates, he chose his crew on two main criteria: versatility and motivation. Francis Joyon: “We will go in a spirit of commando. Team members must invest a lot and spend a lot of time on the deck. They know it all and that is precisely what attracts them in this challenge. ”

 

25/03/2015, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Cheminées Poujoulat (Bernard Stamm/Jean Le Cam) arrival in 1st place. (Photo © Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

25/03/2015, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Cheminées Poujoulat (Bernard Stamm/Jean Le Cam) arrival in 1st place. (Photo © Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

It was just at sunset, in the end, when Bernard Stamm and Jean Le Cam broke the finish line off Barcelona’s iconic W-Hotel to complete their victory in the Barcelona World Race. They punched the air with delight as the gun sounded after 84 days and 5 hours of racing, a joyous release of elation and relief. Within seconds they had their technical team and family aboard on board Cheminées Poujoulat to share the moments.

25/03/2015, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Cheminées Poujoulat (Bernard Stamm/Jean Le Cam) arrival in 1st place. (Photo © Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race)

25/03/2015, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Cheminées Poujoulat (Bernard Stamm/Jean Le Cam) arrival in 1st place. (Photo © Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race)

Both Stamm and Le Cam have endured more than enough of their own histories of disappointments racing round the world to ensure that those seconds after the gun meant so much more.
Stamm was disqualified from the last Vendée Globe for inadvertently receiving outside assistance and in four campaigns has yet to be placed in the pinnacle solo round the world race.

Le Cam once had to abandon the Vendée Globe, in 2008, when his boat capsized off Cape Horn. He also had to retire from the last edition of this race in 2011 when the mast ofPresident, the IMOCA 60 he raced with Bruno Garcia, crashed down just north of the Cape Verde islands. So their success together was as much cathartic as it was a time for celebration.
So, when asked when he was really sure they would win this Barcelona World Race, despite a lead of nearly 1000 miles since before Cape Horn, Stamm admitted:
” When we crossed the finish line, we knew then that we could win.”  
And, following his short, curtailed experience of the 2010-2011 race,  Jean Le Cam was asked if ever he had specific worries about the mast of Cheminées Poujoulat coming down during the race. He responded immediately:
“No. Not at one point………. Only all the time. All the time. It is always with you. It is the most visible and important thing you can see. And when it has happened to you before, it is always in your mind.”
On the dock, below the statue of Christopher Columbus on Barcelona’s Portal de la Pau, they were quizzed for their first reactions:
What does it represent a victory in the Barcelona World Race?
Bernard Stamm: We are always happy and now we are happy because there is a victory after a great adventure …
Jean Le Cam: When we win, we can only be happy. We left Barcelona, it was a circumnavigation and we returned to Barcelona, it’s as simple as that.

Jean Le Cam at press conference (Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

Jean Le Cam at press conference (Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

What are your first feelings?
Bernard Stamm: First and foremost there is a great satisfaction. It all worked well, we managed to overcome all our technical problems and we can say that we have had enough of them.
Jean Le Cam: Certainly. I think that alone, we would not have finished the race. Fortunately Bernard knows well how to climb the mast.
Bernard Stamm: It’s a team effort. The guy who’s on the deck has to work as well, he has to grind to  hoist the one who will work up there. We had lots of problems but together we were able to find solutions.  That is what is different from being two soloists on the same boat.
Bernard Stamm: For three months you share your race with someone else. When we had a technical problem, we were both thinking, we exchanged ideas. And all the time you are keeping the boat moving.
Jean Le Cam: And we had plenty of worries. We went half way around the world with a wind vane cobbled together on a little mast on the back of the boat, which we changed depending on what tack we were on. We finally got one to the top of the mast as you will see there is an external cable running up to it.
Bernard Stamm: We had also had lock worries on the mainsail. I can say that when we successfully repaired them, it was a moment of true happiness.In the press conference:
What were the shared moments of happiness?
Jean Le Cam: Inevitably, when we get to find solutions together, then you share that happiness together. We can’t forget that we had a really windy south, it was a year to remember.
Bernard Stamm: And then there is also the pleasure of making a good move or two.
North of Canaries before reaching a Gibraltar that will be remembered. At first you are so focused and busy, but then like then you see the results and enjoy it.
Jean Le Cam: That’s it. Two up you can really share, it is a really rich experience.
Their relationship? Arguments?
Bernard Stamm: ” If we had any problems with each other it was because we were tired or stressed or both, it was a reflex reaction and these just come and then they are gone as quickly as they came. We generally got on very well. We just focussed on making the boat go well, and as that is a difficult boat to handle, we just basically did not ever have any time to do anything but work on the boat, there was no time for arguments.”
Jean Le Cam; “We are still together. It is not La Vie en Rose. It is like being a couple. We each have carry our own cross. It is not easy for us. You just have to concede things to each other and get on with it, get through each day.

Bernard Stamm at press conference (Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

Bernard Stamm at press conference (Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

Bernard Stamm: ” I have wanted to participate in the Barcelona World Race since the first edition but have  not been able to, so to be able to compete this time, and to win it, is a great reward. I have had a lot of adventures, bad experiences on races, but I have had some great victories too. I have only ever won races which are round the world races.
Jean Le Cam: We always watched all the others, it is always interesting to watch what they are doing, and especially Bruno Garcia who I did the last race with, to see how they were doing. You have an interest in everyone, it is part of the daily life.
Skills, how they worked the boat
Bernard Stamm: ” You have different skills. We covered everything together. I looked after the computer side of things and Jean did more of the techncial stuff on deck. We never, ever defined our roles as such. “

 

Barcelona World Race 2014-2015 Winners Jean Le Cam and Bernard Stamm at finish line in Barcelona after completing circumnavigation on their IMOCA 60   Cheminées Poujoulat, in 84 Days 5 hours. (Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

Barcelona World Race 2014-2015 Winners Jean Le Cam and Bernard Stamm at finish line in Barcelona after completing circumnavigation on their IMOCA 60 Cheminées Poujoulat, in 84 Days 5 hours. (Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget / Barcelona World Race )

 

 

Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Cheminées Poujoulat (Bernard Stamm, Jean Le Cam)

Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Cheminées Poujoulat (Bernard Stamm, Jean Le Cam)

With Cheminées Poujoulat making good progress up the Atlantic, making close to 18kts, 120 miles SW of the Falklands, Cape Horn marks the frontier between the two different worlds inhabited by skippers on the Barcelona World Race.
All but two pairs, the bookends of the fleet, are still awaiting their release from the Big South, the relentless grey, chilly, damp world. For Bernard Stamm and Jean Le Cam, bows of Cheminées Poujoulat pointed NE, there is the added vigour of knowing every mile north is a mile closer to sunshine and tradewinds,  a mile closer to Barcelona, and a mile away from their Southern Oceans escapades. And for seventh placed Nandor Fa and Conrad Colman in Bluff, South Island NZ, there is an unfortunate but not unpleasant technical pitstop as they make repairs to ensure a less troublesome second half of their race. Cheminées Poujoulat had a reasonable passage across the border last night, under the cover of darkness. They crossed into the Atlantic passing 14 miles south of Rock at 00:53 UTC, after 55 days 12 hours and 53 minutes of racing. This afternoon Stamm and Le Cam passed the Strait of Le Maire, between Tierra del Fu ego and Staten Island, and their next choice is which side to leave the Falklands. So far the windward, west side looks better and a shorter route. Tensions remain high between second and third. But by virtue of better, stronger breezes Guillermo Altadill and José Muñoz have progressively driven a bigger and bigger wedge between themselves and third placed Anna Corbella and Gerard Marín. The GAES Centros Auditivos pair have found themselves – rather incongruously – upwind in moderate breezes and so losing miles to Neutrogena. From being within five miles at the start of the week, they are now 115 miles astern of second place. “I think we’ve gone faster [than the Neutrogena] most of the time” Corbella said today, ” But there have been times when they escaped because we slowed down for technical reasons. We just try and hold on for a good fight in the Atlantic, to try and stay relatively close.” For Renault Captur, now back at 48 deg S and targeting the Furious 50s again, there is finally the prospect of pulling miles back on fifth and fourth, One Planet, One Ocean & Pharmaton, and We Are Water: The delta between the two Barcelona boats, One Planet, One Ocean & Pharmaton and We Are Water has now shrunk from 600 miles to 160 in a week. And with the possibility of Renault Captur progressively getting back to them both, an interesting three cornered fight might just be on the cards for their ascent of the Atlantic. Making their pit stop in the country of birth of Conrad Colman, one might have hoped for a more hospitable welcome for Kiwi Colman and his Hungarian counterpart Nandor Fa. But the duo had driving rain, winds over 50kts, and chilly, wet conditions for their final approach.  Spirit of Hungary tied up yesterday at 22:50 UTC at the port of Bluff, on the South Island of New Zealand. Their list of repairs is longer than expected, having discovered on the way in that they needed to replace a couple of keel bolts. “We’re fine, but there is much work to do,” said Fa. “We had a good dinner and we will relax a little. Tomorrow we lift the boat out of the water to change the keel bolts, but basically things go as we expected “ Unscheduled and unwanted their pit stop may be but Colman, is delighted to be briefly in his home country: ” To come into a dairy and see the familiar sights and sounds, to see magazines and chocolates of my childhood it is fantastic to be back in New Zealand.  I have never been here, and it is funny to have to sail half way around the world to discover a new part of my own country, but it is great. We discovered the problems with the keelbolts after we decided to stop. We were chasing a couple of leaks and decided to re-torque the nuts on the keelbolts and unfortunately one have way in our hands. We were already heading in to New Zealand so that made us feel good about our stopover and also quite thankful. ” We are not shooting for the podium and Nandor and I, as since the beginning of the race, we have a long term vision of where we want to be with our careers, what we want from this race. I am trying to establish myself in my career and Nandor is counting every mile as a precious one. So he wants to do them all. So given that, we would be foolish to rush out of here and compromise for the sake of a few extra hours. Skippers quotes: Renault Captur, from email: “Today, we’re back in the fifties. The albatrosses have found us again and are offering their support by flying over the boat, calmly without flapping their wings. Since we set off again, we have been focusing on getting around a low-pressure area blocking our path. Reaching in moderate winds, it all seems to be working out for the moment, and as the hours go by, we have made up a little of the time. We shall be sailing quite close to the centre of this low and beyond that, Renault Capture will be able to dive downwind chasing after the Water Brothers (We are Water) and their compatriots on One Planet one Ocean. Everything is fine on board and we are feeling fairly quiet in between trimming, navigating and looking at the weather. It isn’t that cold yet, so it’s fairly pleasant sailing for the time being. Well done to Jean and Bernard, who rounded Cape Horn some distance ahead making them well placed to achieve overall victory.” ; Anna Corbella (ESP)  GAES Centros Auditivos: ” I am excited about my second crossing of Cape Horn. I want to be there right now, and I think it is important, we want to begin to go north and point the bow in the direction of home that is something we have been looking forwards to for many days now. The conditions at the moment are that we are in a transition zone between two fronts, and at the moment we are sailing upwind with ten knots of wind with flat water, so it quite a strange situation  sailing towards Cape Horn right now, strange, but in a few hours it will change the NW wind will come again. And it will increase. I think we are going to cross the Cape in typical conditions – probably 30kts – and we are happy with that because it should be the last windy situation in the south and we are happy to sail these last days.” Nandor Fa (HUN) Spirit of Hungary:“Our relationship gets deeper and deeper. On the one side we are a sailing partnership we are in one team and we think of ourselves as a team. In any aspect at all we help each other. On the human side there is respect also. I guess at the moment we are a better team than at the start. We have had surgery before (Colman had to put four stitches in Fa’s head)…….I needed a bandage before and so that has been a good exercise for Conrad (jokes) but he is really talented to do it (stitch) like a sailmaker, making much nicer stitches in my head than a doctor. ” ” When we start again we will be pushing the boat, it will feel like racing, of course we will be a long way from the fleet, hopeless to think of catching up, but at least the performance is important to us and from that point of view we race against the most difficult rivals, ourselves and so we push to our limits, we should be satisfied and proud.”< /p> Standings at 1400hrs Wednesday 25/02/2015 1 Cheminées Poujoulat (B Stamm – J Le Cam) at 6695 miles to finish 2 Neutrogena (G Altadill – J Muñoz) + 1096 miles to leader 3 GAES Centros Auditivos (A Corbella – G Marin) + 1211 miles to leader 4 We Are Water (B Garcia – W Garcia) + 3244miles to leader 5 One Planet One Ocean & Pharmaton (A Gelabert – D Costa) + 3405 miles to leader 6 Renault Captur (J Riechers – S Audigane) + 4000.4 miles to leader 7 Spirit of Hungary (N Fa – C Colman) + 4748 miles to leader ABD : Hugo Boss (A. Thomson – P. Ribes)
Bernard Stamm (SUI) and Cheminées Poujopulat (Photo  copyright Cheminées Poujopulat / Barcelona World Race)

Bernard Stamm (SUI) and Cheminées Poujopulat (Photo copyright Cheminées Poujopulat / Barcelona World Race)

 

  • Kerguelens tomorrow for Cheminees Poujoulat
  • We Are Water break Cape of Good Hope
  • GAES Centros Auditivos stem their losses

Another landmark will be ticked off tomorrow for Barcelona World Race leaders Cheminées Poujoulat when they sail north of the lonely Kerguelen Islands.
Coralled north by the race’s Antarctic Exclusion Zone, Bernard Stamm and Jean La Cam will pass 300 miles north of the island archipelago which are in every sense one of the most isolated, lonely spots on planet earth, over 2000 miles from the nearest significantly populated area.

The Kerguelen or Desolation Islands were discoveed 240 years ago by the Breton navigator Yves-Joseph de Kerguelen Trémerec and claimed as French.  There are hundreds of small islands but the only inhabitants are between 45 and 100 French scientists, researchers and engineers stationed there.

As such they are important point on the race course, almost exactly half way from the Cape Good Hope to Australia’s Cape Leeuwin, 2300 miles from the South African cape, 2100 to Leeuwin. They are in effect equidistant from somewhere but quite literally in the middle of nowhere.
They are also the only possible haven for the race fleets when they are crossing this inhospitable stretch of the Indian Ocean. Indeed, just as Jean LeCam was pleased to have passed the Cape Verde islands where his Barcelona World Race ended prematurely, so co-skipper Stamm will subconsciously be pleased to check off the Kerguelens, passing at good speeds with their IMOCA 60 in good shape and with a lead of more than 270 miles. Stamm lost a previous Cheminées Poujoulat when it was grounded in December 2008 during the solo Vendèe Globe. Ironically fellow Swiss skipper Dominique Wavre was also stopped there with a keel problem.

Stamm was not making his memories obv ious indeed he was on good form today when he summed up the Barcelona World Race so far for himself and co-skipper Jean Le Cam.

” A lot has gone on. But all in all the boat performs well , it goes well. Now we had some small technical problems that don’y exactly make our lives easier even now, but nothing is insurmountable. Apart from a passage a little close to the Azores high where we got light winds  we have sailed the course we wanted.”

Cheminées Poujoulat is now lined up 275 miles directly in front of second placed Neutrogena, benefiting from more wind which is more consistent than that of the pursuing duo Guillermo Altadill and José Munoz.
The biggest problem on the horizon for the two leading IMOCA 60s is the former tropical cyclone Diamondra which was more of a threat but which looks to be dissipating now after winds peaking at around 55kts. These storms lose their energy quickly when they pass over the colder water. Nonetheless it remains a concern for Cheminées Poujoulat and for Neutrogena and will certainly alter their relatively straightforwards regime in about three days time.
Their passage of the Cape of Good Hope this morning at 1106hrs UTC is the first Great Cape for the Garcia brothers Bruno and Willy on We Are Water. Considering how little preparation time they had prior to the start, and how both were carrying on their day jobs, Bruno as a heart doctor and Willy as a jewellery retailer until days before the start, their success to date is commendable. Indeed of the fleet they are the first genuine ‘amateurs’  in this race, sailors who make their li ving from outside of the sport.

Anna Corbella and Gérard Marin have meantime stemmed some of their worst losses on GAES Centros Auditivos and have been making double digit boat speeds for much of the day after being badly stuck in a high pressure system, although the light winds are moving east with them. In fact their nearest pursuers, fourth placed Renault Captur are now 416 miles behind when two days ago they were 602 miles astern, but the Spanish duo are now quicker again than Renault Captur’sJorg Riechers and Seb Audigane.

Skippers quotes:

Anna Corbella (ESP) GAES Centros Auditivos:” In fact at the moment we are looking backwards because the meteo we have just now is dangerous for us because the boats in front are gone and the boats in the back are catching us, so at the moment we are looking back. It is our concern. I think after this high pressure we will look forwards again and try to catch some miles again on Neutrogena.
Right now we are going out and have 14kts of wind, downwind sailing now and sailing faster – at 12 kts – in the coming hours we will probably stop again and the wind will got to the front and we are going to have another problem with the high pressure. For the moment the night was not so bad we were sailing slowly but we it was not so bad.
From my side, I don’t know what Gerard thinks, it’s a different race from last time. I don’t know if it is harder. Maybe harder is not the word… but it is a little bit more  intense because since the first days we’ve been sailing with the head of the fleet and we’ve had more pressure and we’ve had to sail as fast as possible. And this makes the race more demanding but not harder. For the moment the weather is the same (as the last edition) and we are doing pretty much the same.
To us, particularly in our case, it is hurting us (the exclusion zone) because it really gives us absolutely no choice. With the ice gates we could have gone up and down a bit, and now all we do is go straight along the line of the exclusion zone. I think for other boats it will be different, I guess in every way it is better or worst. That’s it. I guess it depends on the case.

Bernard Stamm (SUI) Cheminées Poujopulat: “From the beginning we have been O K, we passed a little close to the high and had light winds but since then we have been able to do what we want with no problems, and we were doing everything we can to go as fast as we can, safely as possible. It has been a good first month.”

A month of racing , what conclusions do you draw ?
A lot has gone on. But all in all the boat performs well , it goes well. Now we had some small technical problems that did not make our lives easier even now, but nothing is surmountable . Apart from a passage a little close to the Azores high  we have sailed the course we wanted.
The gaps widen
It is more obvious now that GAES are caught by the anticyclone. With Neutrogena , maybe it will be a bit of concertina effect, I do not know. We make our way according to the the wind not really compared to other competitors.

Things are different from solo?
This is much more serene, sleeping much better. It is good proper slee. Frequently you sleep for three or four hours. Very rarely , much more. Evenother things it is much better . The maneuvers are two , the stacking is with two , it is much simpler.

Life with Jean
Normally , there is no problem. It’s always easier said before , we are not sphinxes , but for many reasons  it has to work. The bottom line is it work for many reasons . Jean said before  said that the biggest concern was the ego. If it was one of us that had this ego problem , but this is not the case, we are tools to make the boat go, so it ‘s going pretty well.

Course to Cape Leeuwin
In front of us on the east coast of Australia , there are two small tropical lows that will come down to us. And our course and strategy will be dicated by how we deal with them. We will have some bad weather, you just have to not push too hard and try and sail in the best, most normal conditions.

The gaps widen
It is more obvious now that GAES are caught by the anticyclone. With Neutrogena , maybe it will be a bit of concertina effect, I do not know. We make our way according to the the wind not really compared to other competitors .

Things are different from solo?
This is much more serene, sleeping much better. It is good proper slee. Frequently you sleep for three or four hours. Very rarely , much more. Evenother things it is much better . The maneuvers are two , the stacking is with two , it is much simpler.

Rankings at 1400hrs UTC Friday 30th January 2015
1. Cheminées Poujoulat (B. Stamm – J. Le Cam) at 15.736,5 miles to the finish
2. Neutrogena (G. Altadill – J. Muñoz) + 272,9 miles to the leader
3. GAES Centros Auditivos (A. Corbella – G. Marín) + 889,8 miles to the leader
4. Renault Captur (J. Riechers – S. Audigane) + 1.305,2 miles to the leader
5. We Are Water (B. Garcia – W. Garcia) + 1.889,4 miles to the leader
6. One Planet, One Ocean & Pharmaton (A. Gelabert – D. Costa) + 2.444,7 miles to the leader
7. Spirit of Hungary (N. Fa – C. Colman) + 2.955,8 miles to the leader
ABD Hugo Boss (A. Thomson – P. Ribes)

23/12/2014, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Barcelona Trainings, We Are Water (Bruno Garcia, Willy Garcia)(Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget/Barcelona World Race)

23/12/2014, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Barcelona Trainings, We Are Water (Bruno Garcia, Willy Garcia)(Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget/Barcelona World Race)