TROPHEE JULES VERNE

 

Francis Joyon on IDEC SPORT (Photo courtesy IDEC SPORT)

Francis Joyon on IDEC SPORT (Photo © IDEC Sport)

December 9th, 2015

The happy faces on the sailors during this morning’s video conference live from IDEC SPORT were a pleasure to see. Francis Joyon’s crew is in the process of seeing their gamble pay off and ending up on the right side of the area of low pressure coming down from Madagascar. The big, red trimaran is smoking: 450 miles regained in two and a half days.

Less than 350 miles behind the record pace in comparison with 800 on Sunday, IDEC SPORT is clocking up the miles at very high speed. Deep in the Southern Ocean, Francis Joyon and his crew of five have put their foot down, clearly stating their goal: to attempt to stay above 30 knots for as long as possible and weave their way around the Great Circle Route low down in the Furious Fifties between 52 and 54 degrees south.

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT in the Indian Ocean (Photo © IDEC Sport)

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT in the Indian Ocean (Photo © IDEC Sport)

As fast as possible on the shortest route
This is not some miracle that has suddenly happened, but the result of a carefully thought out strategy developed with their onshore router, Marcel van Triest. According to him, the risk of encountering icebergs is not as great as 48 hours ago, when a 150m long monster was spotted on the radar. The race track looks clearer now and they can get the speed back up.
So they are on the attack, sailing as fast as possible on the shortest route, even if this means diving down to where no multihull has gone during such a record attempt. Yesterday evening, IDEC SPORT gybed at 54°31 south, after passing to the south of the volcanic Heard Island. “It’s a snow-capped volcano, which is still active. We hoped to see the smoke, but we didn’t get to see anything,” said Francis Joyon. Marcel Van Triest – with five round the world voyages under his belt – remembers that during the first Whitbread and Vendée Globe races, when there were no Ice Gates, a few monohulls sailed as far down. But no multihulls. So, in short, this is a long way south and it is very cold. Outside, your hands and face freeze, and they have to change over at the helm very often, sometimes every half hour. Inside the boat, in spite of the very basic heater, fitted above all to get rid of some of the dampness, it is between 6 and 8 degrees. However, in spite of the harsh conditions, the sailors on IDEC SPORT have a smile on their face. A beaming smile, as it looks like after their hard efforts, their gamble has paid off.
On the right side of the Low
The race against the area of low pressure is being won. That’s today’s good news, as Francis Joyon explained, “The area of low pressure has slowed down, while we managed to go faster than expected, so things are looking up. We are in with a very good chance of making it to the other side of this tropical low.” To be more precise about the movement of the low, it is expected to move behind them on Thursday evening. “Unless they have a major technical problem, they should get ahead, and that is almost certain now,” declared Marcel Van Triest this afternoon.
Francis Joyon added, laughing, “In any case, we have to pull this one off, as otherwise Bernard (Stamm) has threatened to turn us around and come back!” The Swiss sailor made it clear he was joking and that he won’t need to carry out his threat anyhow, as the boat is sailing at 100% of her potential… and the sailors are feeling very upbeat today. In two and a half days, the troops on the red boat have cut their deficit in comparison to the record pace in half, regaining 450 miles. Around a thousand miles from the longitude of Cape Leeuwin that they are expecting to cross early on Friday morning, they are now only 350 miles behind the record run.
450 miles regained
It is true that they are not going to be able to keep on making such gains and at some point in a few days from now, they are going to have to climb back up to fifty degrees south, if we look at the weather charts. But they have already accomplished something. While the end of last week was difficult in terms of the numbers, the start of this week has been very positive and exciting. “When we are at the helm, we remain focused and the goal is to keep up a good VMG, with a compromise between speed and bearing,” the German sailor, Boris Herrmann explained. He went on to talk about the food they were getting on board. In general, they have all they require, but the freeze-dried stuff doesn’t taste that good “while the bits of ham that Bernard prepared are well received.”
Gwénolé Gahinet, the youngest member of the crew and a rookie as far as the Southern Ocean is concerned, feels positive too. Apart from his obvious talents as a sailor, he has also been using software to identify sea birds to teach the crew about what they can see. “Here, under the protection, it’s a bit like a gathering in the pub,” joked Francis Joyon during the live link-up, encouraging his crewmen to take the microphone. It shows what the master of IDEC SPORT is like. He willingly shares the microphone and his experience of adventures at sea. This adventure is up there with the best. The boat is at 100% of her ability, the weather strategy has worked out (more gybes at 1200 and 1400hrs UTC), high speeds and all clear ahead… all the lights are on green for the big red boat.
In short

After 17 and a half days at sea, at 1430hrs UTC on Wednesday 9th December, IDEC SPORT is sailing at 31.4 knots at 53°55 south and 87°46 east. Bearing: east (86°) 345 miles behind the record pace.
The crew
The international crew on IDEC SPORT includes just six men: Francis Joyon (FRA), Bernard Stamm (SUI), Gwénolé Gahinet (FRA), Alex Pella (ESP), Clément Surtel (FRA) and Boris Herrmann (GER)
Start
IDEC SPORT set off at 02:02:22 on Sunday 22nd November.
The time to beat
Loïck Peyron and his crew (Banque Populaire) with a time of 45 days, 13 hours, 42 minutes and 53 seconds.
Deadline
To smash the Jules Verne Trophy record, IDEC SPORT has to be back across the line before 1544hrs on Wednesday 6th January.
A peek on IDEC Sport (Photo © IDEC Sport)

A peek on IDEC Sport (Photo © IDEC Sport)

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening, prior to Their circumnavigation record Attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 14, 2015 - From left to right: skipper Francis Joyon, Roland Jourdain, Clement Surtel , Gwenole Gahinet Boris Herrmann, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella (Photo by Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening, prior to Their circumnavigation record Attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 14, 2015 – From left to right: skipper Francis Joyon, Roland Jourdain, Clement Surtel , Gwenole Gahinet Boris Herrmann, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella (Photo by Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

 

IDEC SPORT, the new maxi-trimaran, Francis Joyon, was baptized on Wednesday October 14 at La Trinité-sur-mer. The stand-by to try and beat the record for the Jules Verne Trophy starts in two weeks. Joyon took the opportunity to present its crew of five sailors, an onshore router, and an alternate. A very European commando mix of experience and youth was announced as well.  

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening with champagne by skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 14, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC - Patrice Lafargue (Pdt IDEC) and Professor Gerard Saillant

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening with champagne by skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 14, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC – Patrice Lafargue (Pdt IDEC) and Professor Gerard Saillant


A story of men …
After a month at the Multiplast yard in Vannes, IDEC SPORT was baptized on Wednesday on the pontoons from its home port: La Trinite-sur-Mer. It was Professor Gérard Saillant, co-founder of the Institute for Brain and Spinal Cord of (ICM), which is the sponsor of this new ride aboard which Francis Joyon and his men will leave in a few weeks at Conquest of the Planet. One goal: try to go round the world sailing in less than 45 days, which amounts to almost halve the clock imagined by Jules Verne for his hero Phileas Fogg …

Who are these men to whom Francis Joyon trusted?  Great sailors, half French, strangers to each other. A very international crew that combines experience and youth. “I only took the skippers,” said Francis to explain that the vessels need to know everything. All will be entrusted with the helm of the largest trimaran. “Unlike most teams provided where there are many specialized marine in one area, we will go with super-versatile aboard IDEC SPORT”. And for good reason: six on board is very little. Only the first winner of the Jules Verne Trophy, Bruno Peyron, had dared to start at five, that was in 1993. Since then, the crew on this record is always between 10 and 14 Marine … it will be necessarily a great human story that will write Francis Joyon and his men around the world this winter. These are men, three French, a Swiss, a Spaniard and a German.

Bernard Stamm Portrait crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Bernard Stamm (SUI) 51

No introduction of this specialist round the world, the only one of IDEC SPORT commando having already won the Jules Verne Trophy (in 2005 aboard the maxi-catamaran Orange 2). Bernard also won a whopping three round the world monohull Twice Around Alone solo and once the Barcelona World Race twice. He also participated three times in the Vendée Globe. This hard hyper talented evil brings its wealth of experience forged over 30 years on all the world’s oceans. Bernard Stamm: “Things have changed since my participation in the Jules Verne Trophy in 2005. The boats are different, the record is harder to take as well. But the principle is always the same: turn as fast as possible around the planet. I think the record is prenable, otherwise I would not be here! ”

 

 

 

 

Gwenole Gahinet portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Gwénolé Gahinet (FRA) 31

The youngest of the team is the son of a legend in ocean racing, alas disappeared: his father Gilles was one of the few to have beaten Eric Tabarly on Transat and have twice won the Solitaire du Figaro. It is also Figaro that “gweno” made a very grand entrance in recent years, winning great results after a first victory on the Mini Transat. Naval architecture engineer, the good head has worked in VPLP, the firm that designed IDEC SPORT. This is his first world tour. Youth, technical knowledge and talent are in his luggage. Gwénolé Gahinet: “I have a lot Orma trimaran sailed and Multi 50 but I still have much to learn about these great multihulls. I open eyes, I record everything. I am very motivated to discover the South Seas is a whole universe that makes you want to be discovered. ”

 

Alex Pella portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Alex Pella (ESP) 42

Born in Barcelona, ​​this dynamic Catalan was first excellent technical preparer giant multihulls – including The Race-before embarking on a remarkable career via the Mini 6.50 (2nd of the Transat), the Class40 (winner Route du Rhum) and everything that floats next big boats, on one or more shells. Fourth in the Barcelona World Race in 2011, he also sailed a lot in multihulls and knows the seas of the Great South. He knows everything. Alex Pella: “I did not hesitate a second when Francis contacted me for the Jules Verne Trophy. This is a great adventure, especially in this configuration with a small crew and boat prowled. This will be my second trip around the world and it will be two times faster than IMOCA 60. ”

 

Clement Surtel portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Clément Surtel (FRA) 36

Nephew of another great sailor – Franck Yves Escoffier– but especially passionate about multihulls, Clement has a huge experience of major general and trimarans IDEC SPORT in particular. He was preparer when it sailed into the hands of Franck Cammas. Besides multiple crews sailing in large (several records with Orange 2 of the Atlantic and including 24 hours), Clement has already participated in two onshore Jules Verne Trophy in 2005 and 2010. This time he sailed! He is very familiar with the boat and its skipper qualities addition, it will be a great help in all technical aspects. Clément Surtel: “I have spent years navigating these great multihulls and that’s it, I’ll have the chance to make my first world tour and getting into the deep end of the South Seas! IDEC is a beautiful SPORT Trusted platform that has been prepared to complete the course in less than 45 days. On board, we will be at the bottom, we’re off to a great transatlantic! ”

 

xxxx portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Boris Herrmann (GER) 34

Two world tours and three passages of Cape Horn: Boris Herrmann knows the great wide! It also comes to force the passage Northeast aboard the old IDEC now in the hands of the Chinese Guo Chuan browser. In 2009, he became the first German to win a round the world sailing: the Global Ocean Race. He too is a jack-of-all engineering, all small monohulls to multihulls giants, with great experience of hostility from the southern seas. It is German but it is a “Swiss Army knife” super versatile. Boris Herrmann: “For my third trip around the world, I am delighted to embark on this boat with which I have already sailed this year. Our motivation is very clear: we go to break the record! The next adventure is a plus, premium competition. ”

 

Roland Jourdain (FRA) 51 (replacing)

Great teams always have a luxury joker on the bench. Just in case … here “Bilou”, which will leave if by chance one of the five crew members was stopped in extremis. As Francis Joyon and Bernard Stamm, he is among those who needs no introduction. Heroes of the Vendée Globe, Le Figaro, the Route du Rhum and large multihulls, his enormous experience reassures everyone. Roland Jourdain: “I love being on the water and go further: the Jules Verne Trophy is a challenge that attracts me. I sailed a lot in multi this year. I will be very hot if Francis needs me. And if not, I will endure the guys from Earth. ”

Onshore router Marcel Van Triest (HOLL), 51

Since his den Balearic front of their computers day and night, Marcel Van Triest will be the IDEC SPORT weather guide. The “Flying Dutchman” is one of the best routers in the world. It’s also a great sailor, who has already done five times round the world race! His small annotated drawings will be scrutinized by Francis Joyon several times a day. It will at once try to beat his own record (Banque Populaire in 45 days and a half, it was him) and try to beat his colleague and friend Jean-Yves Bernot will be the Spindrift router 2, the competitor of IDEC SPORT on the Jules Verne Trophy. His extensive knowledge of ice in the south will also be a valuable asset.

Francis Joyon portrait, skipper of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Francis Joyon (FRA), 59: the boss

One sailor in the world to have held together the four largest ocean records alone (World Tour, Atlantic, 24 hours, Discovery Route), Francis Joyon thus passes crewed mode for this attempt, on a boat which he had long dreamed. After receiving dozens of candidates, he chose his crew on two main criteria: versatility and motivation. Francis Joyon: “We will go in a spirit of commando. Team members must invest a lot and spend a lot of time on the deck. They know it all and that is precisely what attracts them in this challenge. ”