08/02/2015, Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Onboard One Planet One Ocean & Pharmaton with Aleix Gelabert and Didac Costa, Clothing equipment for the Southern ocean ( Photo ©  Aleix Gelabert and Didac Costa)

08/02/2015, Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Onboard One Planet One Ocean & Pharmaton with Aleix Gelabert and Didac Costa, Clothing equipment for the Southern ocean ( Photo © Aleix Gelabert and Didac Costa)

  • Ice Monitoring for the race plays a unique role in research
  • Round the World Races commision 90 per cent of ice tracking research
  • Neutrogena pit stopped

The Barcelona World Race and the competing skippers are playing an important role in one aspect of the monitoring of climate change.
Ice is now seen more frequently and more accurately when it breaks away from the Antarctic ice cap and as it drifts into the areas which have been the traditional southern oceans routes for round the world races.

As a consequence it is vital for the absolute safety of the crews that the positions and movement of ice is tracked and the racing area restricted to avoid danger to the crews.

In fact this comprehensive, accurate level of tracking is done almost exclusively for the Barcelona World Race – and other round the world races – but over time this level of tracking will deliver a direct benefit to scientific research.
Proof of climate change is hard to measure, but even in the Furious 50s and Roaring 40s latitudes Barcelona World Race duos have recently been experiencing warm, sunny interludes.

We are enjoying our summer holiday in the Southern Ocean” quipped Spirit of Hungary’s Conrad Colman a couple of days ago, basking in sunshine and temperatures akin to summer in northern Europe.
At 50 degrees south today Anna Corbella on GAES Centros Auditivos today reflected on a sunny, almost warm respite from the usual cold weather. Renault Captur’s Jorg Riechers and Sébastien Audigane were sailing in short and t-shirts in the Roaring 40s a few days ago.

Such intermissions become part of anecdotal evidence but it is the round the world race’s safety requirement for in-depth study of iceberg detection and the circulation and drift patterns that will help scientists understand the evolution of climate change.

Ice Day in BCN
It was Ice Day at the Barcelona World Race HQ today. In the media studio were Franck Mercier (FRA) of CLS, the organisation which is charged with the actual ice tracking, and Marcel van Triest (NED) who coordinates the safety zone in collaboration with Race Direction. He serves as the race meteorolgist.

Van Triest explained: “Now we know there are large pieces of ice floating in the ocean as it warms up and Antarctic ice is melting and breaking”.
The most immediate recent example are the icebergs which are near the Crozet Islands, quite north of usual expectations. A few days ago One Planet One Ocean Pharmaton were sailing within 70 miles of three or four big icebergs. They were alerted to the exact positions by Race Direction. Aleix Gelabert recalled:

“We had a warning last night from race management about this situation, that there may be a possible growlers in our route and so we changed our course a little bit just in case. There is no need to put ourselves at any additional risk. We are in contact with race management and are very confident about this. There is no problem.”

This race has opted for an exclusion zone rather than ice gates. Speaking today he highlighted how difficult it can be to avoid ice van Triest said:

” If you sail at 10 m/s speed and see an iceberg 200 m away from you, you have only 20 seconds to maneuver, that’s nothing. That’s why we have an exclusion zone, a prohibited zone. It’s better than ice gates. In my first round the world race there were no ice limits, we went down to latitudes 60ºS and 61ºS. Today the technology to detect the ice exists, so we control it, we just can’t send people down there knowing what we know. ”
” With the exclusion zone it gives more control and security. We can go closer to where we know there is ice, like we have done with the icebergs which were at the north of Crozet islands. And the limit can be set more to the South than with the ice gates. Down there there is of course more wind and the route is shorter.”

It may seem remarkable that ocean races like the Barcelona World Race are almost alone in pushing forwards the study of floating ice detection and its tracking.
Van Triest highlights:
“Ocean racing commissions do 90% of ice detection work. And this work has really only been going on for 15 years.”

Franck Mercier of CLS: ” Because of this, round-the-world races like BWR help to work on understanding the climatic change. It’s very expensive to study the ice detection, nobody does it except round-the-world races because it’s very expensive, although it’s very interesting for the understanding of climate change. ”

Also as part of the Barcelona World Race’s drive to propagate scientific understanding, the Argo beacons which were launched recently are already providing interesting information. The one which Neutrogena launched is at 44 deg S and shows a surface sea temperature of 12 Deg. Cheminées Poujoulat’s is at 43 Deg South showing a sea temp of 17 Deg.

Meantime, asked if this is a year of moderate conditions in the Big South for the fleet, both Van Triest and Mercier chorused:
“….for the moment….”

In the Dock, In The Race
In Bluff by Invercargill, South Island New Zealand, repairs to Neutrogena’s failed charging system are reported to be on schedule. Skippers Guillermo Altadill and José Munoz are described as having a good night’s sleep in readiness for their departure which the team believe will be at 0522hrs UTC Saturday morning as per the mandatory minimum 24 hours duration.
Race leaders Cheminées Poujoulat were taking some brief respite in lighter airs today and expect more of the same tomorrow. Jean Le Cam and Bernard Stamm are now nearly 800 miles ahead of the pit-stopped Neutrogena. In turn GAES Centros Auditivos have reduced their deficit to Neutrogena from 1100 miles to 657 miles.

Skippers’ quotes:
Anna Corbella (ESP) GAES Centros Auditivos: ” We are pushing as hard as we can. It is not easy to push harder. But if we have any opportunity to catch Neutrogena then we take it.  
At the moment we feel safe. We did not see any ice. I hope it will continue like this. I think it is safe. I feel confident with the people in the people working on it and I think it is working. I don’t know which system I would prefer, I dont know whether ice gates or the exclusion zone is better. For the moment the exclusion zone for us is not very good. We had some problems in the Indian Ocean because of it. I dont know which I prefer.”

Jean Le Cam, FRA, Cheminées Poujoulat:“The atmosphere on board has changed a bit. After a week when it was hard to do anything less than 19kts average it is quieter again and we are under spinnaker. It is not really that nice but at least the boat is going forwards and it is not slamming. You can drink a coffee quietly and rest. We will make the big general check of the boat tomorrow. It is good.

Stop for Neutrogena
We go as fast and best we can. We are in the rhythym and try not to break it. We route by our weather options and so nothing changes for us. Yes we are comfortable now, that is clear. And it is good. But you still have to stay on it all the time, because no one is immune to a technical problem. Tomorrow we will take full advantage of a little time to make a general check of everything. Neutrogena will get going and it is true we will have a little advance, you can say we are comfortably off. But, hey, we are not immune to shit happening.”

Friday the 13th superstition?
“Yes, pfff, no … On Friday 13 you can take it both ways. So I will take it in the right way. Friday the 13th is called a lucky day. It always reminds me of the boat Yvon Fauconnier, Friday 13. Come on, let’s say it’s a lucky day! »

Antimériden
“For me, it’s a real border. The numbers are decreasing now and that means we are closer. You see, I’m at 173 ° 29 West, and the numbers decrease more, so the closer you get. It is a sign of reconciliation and not a sign of remoteness. It is in the phase of the course when you really start to feel you are going towards the finish.»
Standings Friday 13th February 1400hrs UTC
1 Cheminées Poujoulat (B. Stamm – J. Le Cam) at 10.756,7 miles to finish
2 Neutrogena (G. Altadill – J. Muñoz) + 796,0 miles to leader
3 GAES Centros Auditivos (A. Corbella – G. Marín) + 1.453,9 miles to leader
4 Renault Captur (J. Riechers – S. Audigane) + 1.729,9 miles to leader
5 We Are Water (B. Garcia – W. Garcia) + 2.605,0 miles to leader
6 One Planet, One Ocean & Pharmaton (A. Gelabert – D. Costa) + 3.503,3 millas del líde
7 Spirit of Hungary (N. Fa – C. Colman) + 4.176,9 miles to leader
ABD Hugo Boss (A. Thomson – P. Ribes)

Bernard Stamm (SUI) and Cheminées Poujopulat (Photo  copyright Cheminées Poujopulat / Barcelona World Race)

Bernard Stamm (SUI) and Cheminées Poujopulat (Photo copyright Cheminées Poujopulat / Barcelona World Race)

 

  • Kerguelens tomorrow for Cheminees Poujoulat
  • We Are Water break Cape of Good Hope
  • GAES Centros Auditivos stem their losses

Another landmark will be ticked off tomorrow for Barcelona World Race leaders Cheminées Poujoulat when they sail north of the lonely Kerguelen Islands.
Coralled north by the race’s Antarctic Exclusion Zone, Bernard Stamm and Jean La Cam will pass 300 miles north of the island archipelago which are in every sense one of the most isolated, lonely spots on planet earth, over 2000 miles from the nearest significantly populated area.

The Kerguelen or Desolation Islands were discoveed 240 years ago by the Breton navigator Yves-Joseph de Kerguelen Trémerec and claimed as French.  There are hundreds of small islands but the only inhabitants are between 45 and 100 French scientists, researchers and engineers stationed there.

As such they are important point on the race course, almost exactly half way from the Cape Good Hope to Australia’s Cape Leeuwin, 2300 miles from the South African cape, 2100 to Leeuwin. They are in effect equidistant from somewhere but quite literally in the middle of nowhere.
They are also the only possible haven for the race fleets when they are crossing this inhospitable stretch of the Indian Ocean. Indeed, just as Jean LeCam was pleased to have passed the Cape Verde islands where his Barcelona World Race ended prematurely, so co-skipper Stamm will subconsciously be pleased to check off the Kerguelens, passing at good speeds with their IMOCA 60 in good shape and with a lead of more than 270 miles. Stamm lost a previous Cheminées Poujoulat when it was grounded in December 2008 during the solo Vendèe Globe. Ironically fellow Swiss skipper Dominique Wavre was also stopped there with a keel problem.

Stamm was not making his memories obv ious indeed he was on good form today when he summed up the Barcelona World Race so far for himself and co-skipper Jean Le Cam.

” A lot has gone on. But all in all the boat performs well , it goes well. Now we had some small technical problems that don’y exactly make our lives easier even now, but nothing is insurmountable. Apart from a passage a little close to the Azores high where we got light winds  we have sailed the course we wanted.”

Cheminées Poujoulat is now lined up 275 miles directly in front of second placed Neutrogena, benefiting from more wind which is more consistent than that of the pursuing duo Guillermo Altadill and José Munoz.
The biggest problem on the horizon for the two leading IMOCA 60s is the former tropical cyclone Diamondra which was more of a threat but which looks to be dissipating now after winds peaking at around 55kts. These storms lose their energy quickly when they pass over the colder water. Nonetheless it remains a concern for Cheminées Poujoulat and for Neutrogena and will certainly alter their relatively straightforwards regime in about three days time.
Their passage of the Cape of Good Hope this morning at 1106hrs UTC is the first Great Cape for the Garcia brothers Bruno and Willy on We Are Water. Considering how little preparation time they had prior to the start, and how both were carrying on their day jobs, Bruno as a heart doctor and Willy as a jewellery retailer until days before the start, their success to date is commendable. Indeed of the fleet they are the first genuine ‘amateurs’  in this race, sailors who make their li ving from outside of the sport.

Anna Corbella and Gérard Marin have meantime stemmed some of their worst losses on GAES Centros Auditivos and have been making double digit boat speeds for much of the day after being badly stuck in a high pressure system, although the light winds are moving east with them. In fact their nearest pursuers, fourth placed Renault Captur are now 416 miles behind when two days ago they were 602 miles astern, but the Spanish duo are now quicker again than Renault Captur’sJorg Riechers and Seb Audigane.

Skippers quotes:

Anna Corbella (ESP) GAES Centros Auditivos:” In fact at the moment we are looking backwards because the meteo we have just now is dangerous for us because the boats in front are gone and the boats in the back are catching us, so at the moment we are looking back. It is our concern. I think after this high pressure we will look forwards again and try to catch some miles again on Neutrogena.
Right now we are going out and have 14kts of wind, downwind sailing now and sailing faster – at 12 kts – in the coming hours we will probably stop again and the wind will got to the front and we are going to have another problem with the high pressure. For the moment the night was not so bad we were sailing slowly but we it was not so bad.
From my side, I don’t know what Gerard thinks, it’s a different race from last time. I don’t know if it is harder. Maybe harder is not the word… but it is a little bit more  intense because since the first days we’ve been sailing with the head of the fleet and we’ve had more pressure and we’ve had to sail as fast as possible. And this makes the race more demanding but not harder. For the moment the weather is the same (as the last edition) and we are doing pretty much the same.
To us, particularly in our case, it is hurting us (the exclusion zone) because it really gives us absolutely no choice. With the ice gates we could have gone up and down a bit, and now all we do is go straight along the line of the exclusion zone. I think for other boats it will be different, I guess in every way it is better or worst. That’s it. I guess it depends on the case.

Bernard Stamm (SUI) Cheminées Poujopulat: “From the beginning we have been O K, we passed a little close to the high and had light winds but since then we have been able to do what we want with no problems, and we were doing everything we can to go as fast as we can, safely as possible. It has been a good first month.”

A month of racing , what conclusions do you draw ?
A lot has gone on. But all in all the boat performs well , it goes well. Now we had some small technical problems that did not make our lives easier even now, but nothing is surmountable . Apart from a passage a little close to the Azores high  we have sailed the course we wanted.
The gaps widen
It is more obvious now that GAES are caught by the anticyclone. With Neutrogena , maybe it will be a bit of concertina effect, I do not know. We make our way according to the the wind not really compared to other competitors.

Things are different from solo?
This is much more serene, sleeping much better. It is good proper slee. Frequently you sleep for three or four hours. Very rarely , much more. Evenother things it is much better . The maneuvers are two , the stacking is with two , it is much simpler.

Life with Jean
Normally , there is no problem. It’s always easier said before , we are not sphinxes , but for many reasons  it has to work. The bottom line is it work for many reasons . Jean said before  said that the biggest concern was the ego. If it was one of us that had this ego problem , but this is not the case, we are tools to make the boat go, so it ‘s going pretty well.

Course to Cape Leeuwin
In front of us on the east coast of Australia , there are two small tropical lows that will come down to us. And our course and strategy will be dicated by how we deal with them. We will have some bad weather, you just have to not push too hard and try and sail in the best, most normal conditions.

The gaps widen
It is more obvious now that GAES are caught by the anticyclone. With Neutrogena , maybe it will be a bit of concertina effect, I do not know. We make our way according to the the wind not really compared to other competitors .

Things are different from solo?
This is much more serene, sleeping much better. It is good proper slee. Frequently you sleep for three or four hours. Very rarely , much more. Evenother things it is much better . The maneuvers are two , the stacking is with two , it is much simpler.

Rankings at 1400hrs UTC Friday 30th January 2015
1. Cheminées Poujoulat (B. Stamm – J. Le Cam) at 15.736,5 miles to the finish
2. Neutrogena (G. Altadill – J. Muñoz) + 272,9 miles to the leader
3. GAES Centros Auditivos (A. Corbella – G. Marín) + 889,8 miles to the leader
4. Renault Captur (J. Riechers – S. Audigane) + 1.305,2 miles to the leader
5. We Are Water (B. Garcia – W. Garcia) + 1.889,4 miles to the leader
6. One Planet, One Ocean & Pharmaton (A. Gelabert – D. Costa) + 2.444,7 miles to the leader
7. Spirit of Hungary (N. Fa – C. Colman) + 2.955,8 miles to the leader
ABD Hugo Boss (A. Thomson – P. Ribes)

23/12/2014, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Barcelona Trainings, We Are Water (Bruno Garcia, Willy Garcia)(Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget/Barcelona World Race)

23/12/2014, Barcelona (ESP), Barcelona World Race 2014-15, Barcelona Trainings, We Are Water (Bruno Garcia, Willy Garcia)(Photo by Gilles Martin-Raget/Barcelona World Race)

 

Barcelona World Race 2014/2015 Start (Photo © Nico Martínez / Barcelona World Race )

Barcelona World Race 2014/2015 Start (Photo © Nico Martínez / Barcelona World Race )

 

As if to underline their billing as pre-race favourites to win, Alex Thomson and Pepe Ribes on Hugo Boss led the eight-strong fleet of IMOCA 60s off the start line of the third edition of the Barcelona World Race, two handed race around the world. The British-Spanish duo made the best of the very light winds, setting up with speed at the gun, to eke out a small lead to the turning mark, 1.5 miles away from the line.

NEWS  DEC 31, 2015

With 23,450 miles to sail, of course the early advantage to the British-Spanish duo might only appear to be psychological and within the first hour of racing they found themselves snared by the combination of very calm winds and wash from the sizeable spectator fleet, and were passed by the Swiss-French pairing Bernard Stamm and Jean Le Cam on Cheminées Poujoulat, but the main objective for all was to ensure they stay in the lead group on what will be a tricky, challenging descent of the Mediterranean to the exit doors at the Straits of Gibraltar.

As per forecast breezes were only very light for the start, 2-6 knots. But the sun shone brightly and brought out huge crowds to the beaches of the Catalan capital. To all intents it felt less like the last day of 2014 in the depths of winter, and more like a day stolen from summer.

The warmth of the sunshine leant an almost surreal air to the emotional scenes as the 16 skippers left the Barcelona World Race dock this morning. They may be heading for some of the most feared stretches of the world’s oceans, but there was a welcome serenity as the crowds bid farewell to each of the duos. To those observers and skippers more used to the oppressive atmosphere of other winter race starts, usually contemplating Atlantic storms, it was a pleasant change.

But for all that, emotions bubbled to the surface, tugging hard at the heartstrings. Who could fail to be moved when Alex Thomson and his four-year-old son Oscar shouted ‘Good bye’ to each other across the widening gap between the pontoon and the departing 60-foot monohull? In their private world it was a beautiful toddler waving his dad off to a day at the office – even if Thomson blinked back a tear behind the Hugo Boss designer shades – but to everyone else it was a harsh reminder of the imminent three months of separation from the son whose illness precluded his participation in the last edition.

Hugo Boss team-mate Pepe Ribes’ farewell to Pepe Ribes Jr was no less touching, considering the last time he left on this race his son was only three weeks old. This time GAES Centros Auditivos’Gérard Marin’s son is only a few months old.

The biggest cheer of the morning was for Anna Corbella, the only female skipper in the race who became the first Spanish woman to sail around the world when she finished the second edition of the race in April 2011 with Briton Dee Caffari. Corbella and Gérard Marin, both local to Barcelona, have been training for two years with their GAES Centros Auditivos and harbour high hopes of a podium finish.

Their partisan fan club were, predictably, the loudest. Corbella’s smile wavered as if to crack but as the docklines came aboard, her game face was fixed and she was immediately in ‘race mode’.
When the gun sounded at 1300hrs local time (1200hrs UTC) GAES Centros Auditivos looked to have made the best start along with Hugo Boss and Renault Captur (Jorge Riechers and Sébastien Audigane), but both GAES Centros Auditivos and One Planet One Ocean Pharmaton (Aleix Gelabeirtand Didac Costa) jumped the gun and had to restart.

As well as media, family, friends and team-mates, the dock was dotted with key figures of the race including twice winner Jean-Pierre Dick, who saw off the eight boats, and Race Director Jacques Caraës, who helped many teams slip their lines. FNOB president Maite Fandos, the depute mayor of Barcelona; IMOCA President Jean Kehroas; Peter Bayer, General Manager of Open Sports Management, and the President of the Spanish Sailing Federation José Ángel Rodríguez, all joined the farewell.

Meanwhile the city of Barcelona delivered a ‘tapas menu’ of live performance featuring wind instruments, spraying water, seashells, and performance artists by the Fura dels Baus as a fitting show as the Mayor of Barcelona Xavier Trias lowered a flag on the La Dona of Mil·leni sculpture to signify the start of the race.

Winds might only have been light at the start but the skippers know the pressure is absolutely on from the start. The race start sat between two wind zones. To the east the brisk NE’ly Tramontana is a strong lure, to sail more miles to reach this corridor of breeze does represent the high risk option but with potentially the biggest reward. A fast passage to the Balearics would allow the leader(s) to hold on to this wind longest. Conversely, this breeze will fade first, potentially leaving any gamblers on this flank downwind in very gentle winds. The alternative is to sail the direct, rhumb line – or to the west of it – and wait until the NE’ly has strengthened all the way to the Spanish coast.

The overall balance between the options remained unclear. For sure there is a ‘rich get richer’ scenario for anyone who breaks through the Strait of Gibraltar first, breaching the brisk, favourable trade winds first for quick train ride south. But the greater likelihood is of a period of very light winds in the busy gateway between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean.

Follow the race:
See the Barcelona World Race Leaderboard, Tracking, Weather Guide, TV schedule and much more athttp://www.barcelonaworldrace.org/en/race-live. Tracker positions are updated at 0500, 0900, 1400 and 1900hrs (UTC).  http://barcelonaworldrace.geovoile.org/2015/

Ranking at 14:00 UTC December 31, 2014:

1 Cheminées Poujoulat (B Stamm – J Le Cam) 23 448.3 miles from the finish

2 GAES Centros Auditivos (A Corbella – G Marino) 0.3 miles to leader

3 Renault Captur (J Riechers – S Audigane) 0.6 miles to leader

4 Hugo Boss (A Thomson – Ribes P) 0.7 miles to leader

5 Neutrogena (G Altadill – Muñoz J) 1.2 miles to leader

6 We Are Water (B Garcia – Garcia W) 1.2 miles to leader

7 One Planet One Ocean & Pharmaton (A Gelabert – Costa D) 1.2 miles to leader

8 Spirit of Hungary (N F – C Colman) 1.3 miles to leader

 

Skippers’ quotes:

Guillermo Altadill (ESP), Neutrogena:

“The last GRIB files are showing a little bit variable conditions that are quite tricky. It’s going to be quite open to the Straits – you could go inshore, offshore, so I think it’s going to be quite tricky and very open for all the fleet. We hope to be at Gibraltar ahead, but it’s not very relevant in one race that’s 25000 miles to be ahead 10 miles at Gibraltar, it makes you feel better but it’s not very important.

“You make your own pressure, but it’s going to be pressure for everybody because everybody is going to push the boat and be the first one out to Gibraltar, but for us it’s about holding onto the fleet and to be with the fleet the first part of the race.”

“I’ve probably [raced to Gibraltar] 20 or 25 times. The Med is very unpredictable, so the more you know and the more you race here… you get more confused!”

Nandor Far (HUN), Spirit of Hungary:

“I’m quite relaxed. We did our best to be finished, to be 100 per cent prepared, but you never know. The boat is a very complicated piece so there is always something which is going wrong. Right now I feel the boat is well prepared.

“We are concentrating on the wind and the proper sail choice, and going out in a safe good way, that’s all. It will be nice to have time to think about everything. If we want to be in a good place we have to make good progress, but I’m not worried really.”

Anna Corbella (ESP), GAES Centros Auditivos:

“I’m feeling excited and happy. I want to get going! The weather is OK, it’s nice. It’s easy – in terms of physically, so it’s not going to be a lot of sail changes, I think it’s nice downwind to Gibraltar. Probably at some point it’s not [going to be] easy, but I think what is important is to be at Gibraltar in a good position, and to go out in a good position.”

Alex Thomson (GBR), Hugo Boss:

“I think the first 5-6 hours there probably won’t be very much wind, and then after that we should see some breeze, some fairly good breeze hopefully. Then the breeze will run out, but whether we get to Gibraltar or not I don’t know.

“I think for all of us the routing shows that the people at the front will gain and the people at the back will lose – so all the pressure is to be at the front of the pack and not to not lose too much is important. We feel fortunate that we’ve got a boat that can probably catch everybody up if we need to catch everybody up, but we don’t really want to be in that position really!

“As a team we feel very confident. We’ve put in a lot of work and a lot of prep. These last moments are always a bit heartfelt because of the family and leaving them behind for three months. I think it’s not something you would want to get used to, because if you got used to it then it would maybe mean you don’t care as much as you do.”

 

Barcelona Word Race 2014/2015PRESS CONFERENCE SKIPPERS (Photo by Martinez Studio )

Barcelona Word Race 2014/2015PRESS CONFERENCE SKIPPERS (Photo by Martinez Studio )

 

The 16 skippers, eight duos, who are set to take on the 2014-2015 Barcelona World Race gathered to face the media at today’s busy official press conference, the last official gathering of all the teams before the race start on 31st December, now less than 48 hours away.

The conference was opened by Jean Kerhoas, IMOCA Class President, who introduced the UNESCO marine research and education programmes which are essential to this edition of the race, innovating by integrating the round the world competition with an ambitious scientific research programme and a global, openly available further education programme.

He was followed by Race Director Jacques Caräes who explained the starting procedure, which will see the eight IMOCA 60s start at 1300hrs, heading north-easterly along the Barcelona beachfront, before rounding the North Buoy turning mark and heading for Gibraltar and the Atlantic.

But all attention was focused on the 16 sailors gathered on stage. As ever body language and attitude spoke louder and more comprehensively than the words they uttered. Some, like veteran Jean Le Cam (Cheminees Poujoulat), appearing like it was just another work day at the office, relaxed and enjoying the build-up to his second Barcelona World Race. When asked about his final preparations, Le Cam joked that he was going to be mostly eating for the next two days. Guillermo Altadill (Neutrogena), approaching his seventh global circumnavigation, also played to the gallery:

“I live in a small village 90 kilometers from Barcelona. And I realised that I had left the lights on.. So my plan for the next two days, will be to go back tomorrow and put them out!” But for all his humour, fiery Catalan Altadill knows he has been given a gilt edged chance of winning the race which starts and finishes on the waters where he first learned to sail, an opportunity of a victory which would rank him as the first Spaniard to win a major IMOCA race, the same as it would be for Pepe Ribes who grew up in Benissa beside Calpe, 75 kilometres down the race track. 

Newport Bucket Regatta 2014 (Photo by George Bekris  -   www.georgebekris.com

Newport Bucket Regatta 2014 (Photo by George Bekris – www.georgebekris.com

By Hank Halsted

In anticipation of a very light day for race #3 of the 2014 Newport Bucket, the Race Committee selected conservative courses of 11 miles for the Grandes Dames and 13 for the Gazelles, with provision for shortening the course even farther if necessary, in the forecast dying breeze.  Little did they know, that the author and his wife the wind goddess, had conducted the Neptune Ritual at the height of the Bucket Bash, delivering two double shots of Mount Gay Rum to the end of Charlie Dock which, after a brief incantation, supplication and flat-out begging for wind, were cast upon the waters as an offering to the Big Guy with the Trident.  The racing started in a light nor’easter with most yachts popping spinnakers as they passed our lovely Committee Boat, 97′ Classic Vicem, CHANSON. However, the rum worked its magic and the sea breeze was early upon us as the wind shifted southeast and built to a reliable 11-12 knots for the rest of the day. Hail Neptune!

Among the Grandes Dames, it was METEOR’s day in the sun.  With two second place finishes in the regatta she started on her numbers and sailed fast downwind to meet the sea breeze head-on, shortened to her upwind sails and completed the course fast and flawlessly to finish nearly 15 minutes before ALTAIR in 2nd, with KAWIL rapidly closing from astern, just 35 seconds later in 3rd. METEOR’s win broke the three way tie for class honors, with METEOR in 1st, ALTAIR in 2nd and KAWIL 3rd among Les Grandes Dames.

The breeze held and filled in for the Gazelles and by the time P2 started, the sea breeze had even reached the starting area to give her an upwind start. Unfazed, the P2 crew trimmed for the conditions and romped around the course to claim the perfect “Hat Trick” with three wins for the Regatta.  The drama ran a bit deeper elsewhere among the Gazelles, led by WILD HORSES, who evidently did not fully absorb the plot for the day and proceeded to sail the shorter course for the Grandes Dames.  Evidently, TEMPUS FUGIT was so intent on catching the W Boat that they too, spent some time sprinting to the wrong mark, which allowed MARIE to finish with a comfortable second ahead of TEMPUS FUGIT, in third.  In the cumulative class results for the Gazelles, the clear winner was P2, with MARIE in 2nd and TEMPUS FUGIT in 3rd.

Class winners P2 and METEOR were presented with beautiful handcrafted Ship’s Bell Clocks from Chelsea Clock.

The awards presentation was hosted by the International Yacht Restoration School.  It was a great final gathering of the owners and crews in what had been one of the smallest Bucket Regattas in years with only seven boats, but without a doubt among the best Buckets ever.  The consistent comment was that the smaller fleet gave rise to a greater level of intimacy between the yachts and a heightened sense of camaraderie from start to finish.

Once the Class awards had been presented and the winners saluted by all, the Discretionary Awards were celebrated.  The Newport Chippewa Bomb, is presented to the yacht that best cultivates the fun and good times that this event is known for, with the best spin of left-field good humor.  This year it was looking pretty good for the crew of WILD HORSES, after they showed up at the Bucket Bash as the W Posse in full cowboy regalia, with vests, hats and six guns blazing.  However, Captain Wes and the MARIE crew had done their homework thoroughly and discovered that the Bash Band was going to be a full Beatles retinue.  When they showed up fully dressed as Sargent Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, in full uniform with gold braid and epilates, wigs and dark glasses, they launched the party to new heights.  This was a class act and a clear “Bomb” of a win.  We’re a bit concerned however, because MARIE has a legendary supply of black powder for her myriad of cannons and we’ve left the bomb in their care. . .

The newly minted Golden Pineapple Award, for the best hospitality within the fleet and basically, the “Winner of the Party” was also a close contest.  We thought we had a clear winner in LADY VICTORIA, which put on a table beyond compare at Friday’s Open House and entertained hundreds of guests with open epicurean southern hospitality.  However, our Committee Boat, the classic CHANSON owned by the Stidolph family and fully populated with three generations aboard, set a new standard not only for good times aboard (which never stopped), but for fully joining the fun of the event.  By Sunday, our hostess had taken over as the new Bucket Cannoneer!  We trust they will enjoy their gourmet dinner for six at the Clarke Cook House’s Sky Bar, sponsored by David Ray and also with our compliments!

The Wolter Huisman “Spirit of the Bucket” award is presented at each event by Alice Huisman, to recognize the yacht that best exhibits our core values of sportsmanship, safe seamanship, best hospitality and overall contribution to the event.  It is this spirit that sets the Bucket Regattas apart from all other events.  This year, the Wolter Huisman Spirit of the Bucket Award was presented to Donald Tofias, owner of WILD HORSES, in recognition of the fact that over the past 18 years he has participated in over thirty Bucket events and in a number of regattas, he entered two boats!  Donald’s contributions and support for the Buckets over many years are deeply appreciated.

The Vitters Seamanship trophy is presented to the yacht that demonstrates the best seamanship and sportsmanship in the interest of promoting safety on the race course.  It was an easy selection this year to recognize the yacht P2, for their many contributions to the sport of superyacht racing.  From the early days of racing their 50M Perini Navi cruising yacht, Mr. & Mrs. Andlinger and their team recognized the value of raising the bar on professional boat and sail handling, and they have never stopped perfecting every move.  On the new P2, the team has been together and refined their skill set since launching, with Jonathan Kline and Mr. A attracting a force of industry leaders to perfect every move aboard.  Their contributions to superyacht safety and the consistent contributions from many of the crew to the SYRA safety committee are fully celebrated in presentation of this award.  Well done P2!

Well done also in winning the 2014 Newport Bucket Regatta with a perfect score of three firsts!  This time around, P2 did not miss a beat winning a place on the perpetual trophy and taking home a beautiful crystal bucket.  Second place overall was earned by the crew of METEOR after her great Sunday race and third place was well earned by KAWIL.  Well sailed all!!

FLEET RESULTS FINAL
Race 3 FINISH TIME Cumulative Results Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Total Final
Points TIME Delta Points Points Points Points Rank
METEOR 1 1:59:00 PM 0:00:00 P2 1 1 4 6 1
ALTAIR 2 2:12:52 PM 0:13:52 METEOR 3 6 1 10 2
KAWIL 3 2:13:27 PM 0:14:27 KAWIL 2 7 3 12 3
P2 4 2:31:38 PM 0:32:38 MARIE 4 3 5 12 4
MARIE 5 2:39:41 PM 0:40:41 ALTAIR 6 5 2 13 5
TEMPUS FUGIT 6 2:49:16 PM 0:50:16 TEMPUS FUGIT 5 2 6 13 6
WILD HORSES 8 RET n/a WILD HORSES 7 4 8 19 7
CLASS RESULTS — GRAND DAMES
Race 3 FINISH TIME Cumulative Results Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Total Final
Points TIME Delta Points Points Points Points Rank
METEOR 1 1:59:00 PM 0:00:00 METEOR 2 2 1 5 1
ALTAIR 2 2:12:52 PM 0:13:52 ALTAIR 3 1 2 6 2
KAWIL 3 2:13:27 PM 0:14:27 KAWIL 1 3 3 7 3
CLASS RESULTS — GAZELLES
Race 3 FINISH TIME Cumulative Results Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Total Final
Points TIME Delta Points Points Points Points Rank
P2 1 2:31:38 PM 0:00:00 P2 1 1 1 3 1
MARIE 2 2:39:41 PM 0:08:03 MARIE 2 3 2 7 2
TEMPUS FUGIT 3 2:49:16 PM 0:17:38 TEMPUS FUGIT 3 2 3 8 3
WILD HORSES 5 RET n/a WILD HORSES 4 4 5 13 4
Overall winner under IRC - Varuna, Ker 51, Jens Kellinghusen (GER) - 2014 Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race - Rick Tomlinson/RORC

Overall winner under IRC – Varuna, Ker 51, Jens Kellinghusen (GER) – 2014 Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race – Rick Tomlinson/RORC

The Royal Ocean Racing Club has declared Jens Kellinghusen’s Ker 51, Varuna (GER), as the overall winner under IRC of the 2014 Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race.
Sevenstar Yacht Transport have also awarded Jens Kellinghusen with a $20,000 voucher to ship Varuna to their selected destination worldwide, which will be used to transport Varuna to Malta to take part in the Rolex Middle Sea Race, the final race of the RORC Season’s Points Championship.

Although six yachts are still racing, none of them can better Varuna’s corrected time racing under IRC. Jens Kellinghusen was quick to praise his crew for their performance, Varuna has no powered winches and the tough conditions required tremendous physical exertion and long hours hiking out on the rail:

“The weather conditions really suited Varuna. Our biggest competition was with the canting keel boats, which would have preferred reaching, but the downwind conditions towards the end were ideal for us. I am so happy for the crew as they all did a great job and the boat held together in some testing conditions. I am very pleased, this is the first time we have participated and we really enjoyed the race. We already use Sevenstar for transporting Varuna, so the $20,000 from the sponsors is very much appreciated.”

Celebrations for Varuna on the dock after crossing the finish of the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race - Credit: Patrick Eden/RORC

Celebrations for Varuna on the dock after crossing the finish of the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race – Credit: Patrick Eden/RORC

 

Varuna’s Winning Crew:

Jens Kellinghusen, Owner, Hamburg, Germany
Tim Daase, Pit/Boat Captain, Wewelsfleth, Germany
Guenter Alajmo, Runner, Hamburg, Germany
Guillermo Altadill, Navigator, Barcelona, Spain
Luke Molloy, Trimmer, Brisbane, Australia
David Blass, Trimmer, Braunschweig, Germany
Fynn Terveer, Pit, Kiel, Germany
Jan Hilbert, Driver, Kiel Germany
Gunnar Knierim, Driver, Kiel, Germany
Peter Knight, Bow, Guernsey, UK
Christian Stoffers, Bow, Kiel, Germany
Alastair Sayers, Bow, Hobart, Tasmania

At 0900 BST Friday 22 August, the remaining six yachts racing in the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race are experiencing downwind conditions in plenty of breeze. J/122, Relentless on Jellyfish, skippered by James George, was just 38 miles from the finish holding off a strong challenge from the Army Sailing Association’s J/111, British Soldier, which is six miles behind the on-the-water leader. Both yachts are expected to finish this afternoon.

Hanse 531, Saga, skippered by Peter Hopps, passed The Lizard at midnight. At 0900 BST, Saga was 30 miles from Portland Bill with 100 miles to go. Saga is expected to finish the race around midnight on Saturday 23rd August.

Rare Leads the Two-Handers

Just after midnight last night, Ian Hoddle’s Figaro II, Rare, passed Liam Coyne’s First 36.7, Lula Belle, as the Two-Handed teams approached the Scilly Isles. At 0900 BST Rare had extended their lead by 11 miles to lead on the water as the two yachts passed The Lizard. However, after time correction, Lula Belle is still the leading the Two-Handed Class by a considerable margin. Werner Landwehr’s Figaro II, Dessert D’Alcyone, was 70 miles from the Scilly Isles, 300 miles from the finish.
Liam Coyne’s First 36.7, Lula Belle – Credit: Paul Wyeth/RORC

Liam Coyne, skipper of Lula Belle, contacted the Royal Ocean Racing Club in the early hours of this morning. The Irish pair of Liam Coyne and Brian Flahive have been racing for 11 days surviving gale force winds, but fatigue and gear failure is taking its toll. Lula Belle’s engine has failed to start, essential to charge their batteries, and the sails are showing signs of the battering they have received.

Without access to the fleet tracking player on the RORC website, Liam was unaware that Rare was passing them, as Liam Coyne wrote this from Lula Belle, while at sea:

“Day 10 (I think). Winds filled in quicker at Mizen Head than we expected. Thank God we still have the A5 kite and she was great today. With no electronics on board we don’t know speeds, but we are flying. We expected Rare to rocket past us today, so we were going fast to hold him off. We are now 10 nm from the Scillys and we took the A5 down as it was getting to hard to hold. Lucky we decided to, as there were two more areas needed sewing which our “MacGyver” on board Brian duly did. Handy to have such a multi tasker. We hope when we round the next mark we might get one more spin out of the A5. It’s literally hanging on by a thread.

“On a lighter side the other night we had a show to remember. As anyone who sails knows there is an algae in the water, which when disturbed by the boat’s wake causes it to light up. On a really frustrating watch where the sky was pure black it was almost impossible to helm. At night we usually pick a cloud or star to follow. A night with black clouds and little wind is exhausting. I was nearly in tears with frustration when the dolphins showed up. We see them every day but this night I presume it was the black sky but they were lit up white (from the Algae) and not only were they illuminated they left a 20′ trail of illuminated water after them. It looked like the Red Arrows doing synchronized swimming. For 30 minutes I forgot about the Boat went and sat at the mast and watched the show of a lifetime. All day we see them break water but here you could see them underwater darting here and there. Sometimes 3 abreast going left, right left right over and over in perfect harmony leaving the illuminated trails in their wakes. It was an unbelievable sight. Nice of them to cheer a sailor up on a tough night.”

Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

He’s done it! At 1738hrs UTC (1938hrs CET) on Monday 21st April 2014, the IDEC maxi-trimaran crossed the finishing line in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. Francis Joyon has set a new reference time for the Friendship Route between Bordeaux (France) and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). His race time: 13 days, 03 hours, 05 minutes and 19 seconds for the theoretical 4812 miles.

 

ALF0651Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

Francis Joyon left Bordeaux on Tuesday 8th April beginning in the Gironde Estuary at 1433hrs UTC. This was merely four days after officially going on stand by with the support in particular  of the French football team, the Girondins de Bordeaux and Fabien Barthez among others. This new Friendship Route between Bordeaux and Rio de Janeiro was designed to bring together France and Brazil and come to the aid of charities in Brazil, as well as the ICM, the Brain and Spinal Cord Institute in France.

Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

An average speed of 15.2 knots on the Great Circle Route and 18.1 knots out on the water

 

IDEC’s race time: 13 days, 03 hours, 05 minutes and 19 seconds to sail the 4812 miles of the theoretical route or 15.27 knots. In reality, IDEC sailed 910 miles more out on the water: 5722 nautical miles at an average speed of 18.16 knots. The explanation: Francis Joyon had to go around all the low-pressure areas from Cape Finisterre to the middle of the Atlantic. He had no hesitation in sailing 900 miles away from the direct route. Once again, Francis Joyon has managed to get the most out of his maxi trimaran to play with the various weather systems. He very often got up to around thirty knots…

The final 24 hours of sailing along the coast of Brazil were very demanding for the skipper of IDEC, who had to sail upwind for the final 120 miles to Rio de Janeiro. Exhausted after missing out on his sleep, Francis Joyon had to keep hard at it, carrying out changes of tack and many manoeuvres to reach the finishing line. These thirteen days of sailing were rather unusual as he had to sail a long way north to get to the west and this demanded a lot of effort. A few moments after crossing the line, Francis Joyon gave us his first impressions of this new record.

What Francis Joyon told us at the finish

His first reaction

I’m really pleased to have finished, as the final 24 hours were very testing. Physically I’m exhausted. I haven’t slept for two days because of the conditions, but also because there is really a lot of shipping along the coast of Brazil. You have to remain alert all the time. This is a particularly exhausting job.”

The final 24 hours at sea

The final hurdle was very stressful. Around midnight last night, I found myself in a huge storm, which was quite impressive… and the wind suddenly swung around 180 degrees. I went from downwind sailing to upwind sailing with the wind strength all over the place going from 10 to 25 knots in just a few seconds. Aboard a giant multihull like IDEC, these are challenging conditions. You have to keep manoeuvring, taking in reefs and making changes. And at the same time there is the threat of all the shipping between the coast and the offshore oil rigs. A tug came close to the boat, while I was carrying out manoeuvres for example. And with the wind coming straight at me, everyone knows that neither I nor the boat likes that. That’s why I’m particularly pleased to be here now in Brazil.

The time and the route

Before setting off from Bordeaux, I thought it would take around fifteen days. So thirteen days isn’t that bad, taking into account my route off to the west that was necessary to get around the lows in the Atlantic, then the width of the Doldrums (300 miles, editor’s note) where I was slowed down, but never came to a complete standstill. This route was excellent training for the Route du Rhum: when I finally got back on a southerly route in the Atlantic, I was only two days away from Guadeloupe! I sailed a lot of miles, a lot more than indicated on the theoretical route… and I learnt a lot. Each mile sailed, each manoeuvre carried out helps me get to know the boat. My time can of course be improved, if the weather cooperates allowing a more direct route.”

The boat

I’m really pleased as IDEC has shown that she is still fast and reliable. I didn’t break anything important. The little problems I had along the way were routine incidents and not that important. I’m going to be able to sort them all out by myself here in Brazil. They are only minor details. So there is nothing to worry about on that score.

For the ICM

Sailing to support the ICM and for charities is very motivating for me. It adds something spiritual to the mere sport of sailing.

REMINDER

This new record between Bordeaux and Rio de Janeiro was aimed at creating a friendly link between France and Brazil. It brought together ambassadors from both countries – personalities from the world of sport, the arts, business and the media to offer support to Brazilian charities and the ICM, the Brain and Spinal Cord Institute.

For this latest 4800-mile long route across the Atlantic, the big red trimaran hoisted the Sail of Hope, signed in France and Brazil by the ambassadors from both countries involved in this project. This sail will be auctioned for charity at the end of the year at a gala event in Paris with all the proceeds going to Brazilian charities and the ICM, the Brain and Spinal Cord Institute.

Joyon, the record hunter

Francis Joyon was the first sailor to win the Ultimate Trophy. He is the only one to have held the four following records at the same time:

-The Round the World Record: 57 days 13 hours 34 minutes and 6 seconds, February 2008 (still the record today)

-The North Atlantic Record: 5 days, 2 hours, 56 minutes and 10 seconds, June 2013 (still the record today)

-24-hour record: 666.2 miles sailed, July 2012

-Columbus Route Record (Cadiz – San Salvador): 8 days 16 hours 7 minutes and 5 seconds, February 2013

 

_ALF0730Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

Francis Joyon Arrives is Rio , passing Sugar Loaf , to set the bar for the Friendship route (Photo © ANDRE FONTES /IDEC )

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 (Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi)

.

This morning, dockside at The Bucket, it sounded rather funny for sailors to be talking about a “Not So Wiggley Course” with such reverence, but when the day was done and a second of three races had entered the 2014 regatta history books, it was quite clear why. Mademoiselle, Elegante and Gazelle classes took on the long version (27.1 nm) of the course, which started on the west side of St. Barths and wound its way around smaller islands and rocks to the north, while the Grande Dames sailed the shorter version (22 nm) in winds that were a few knots less than yesterday’s yet just as feisty. The “not so” in the course description was obviously tongue-in-cheek, as the 38 superyachts -ranging in size from 27.5m/88′ to 66.7m/216′-zigged and zagged more than the usual number of times while crews executed numerous sail changes as well as spinnaker hoists and takedowns, alternately winding their charges up to gain advantage, then dialing them down to safely share close quarters at rounding marks with their magnificently sized competitors.

Saint Barth Bucket 2014  Gustavia Port in Saint Barth Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi — at Saint Barth.

Saint Barth Bucket 2014
Gustavia Port in Saint Barth Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi — at Saint Barth.

Leading in the Elegantes class after finishing third today and combining that with a first from yesterday is the 54 m/180′ Vitters Ketch Marie, whose tactician Tony Rey, in describing his day, was beaming like a little kid who had just gotten away with something bigger than he expected.

“Anybody who says superyacht racing is champagne and cocktails and taking it easy hasn’t been to The Bucket,” he said. “It’s an absolutely spectacular exercise in teamwork to get these things around the track.”

Rey said he was pleased with Marie’s start and the first third of the leg but then encountered the classic situation of gaining so much that suddenly the team was in the mix with way more boats than he was comfortable with. “It was just mildly terrifying, which is a typical feeling in the afterguards at Bucket Regattas,” said Rey, who counts this as his fifth Bucket Regatta aboard Marie. “This means we’re having a good day.”

Adele: Ketch_Vitters_Hoek_54.6m Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race 1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi  at Saint Barth.

Adele: Ketch_Vitters_Hoek_54.6m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race 1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi at Saint Barth.

Marie’s crew had a few missteps with its maneuvers (including “breaking a spinnaker and putting it in the water”), but others in the class did, as well, and six boats were abreast coming around Roche Table.

“It was absolutely spectacular; there were 40 meters on each side,” Rey said, alluding to the International Superyacht Rule that requires boats to leave 40 meters in all directions between themselves and their competitors. “I didn’t need sun screen because there was shade from all the sails.”

 

Seahawk: Ketch_Perini Navi_Holland_58.6m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi  at Saint Barth.

Seahawk: Ketch_Perini Navi_Holland_58.6m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi at Saint Barth.

Seahawk, in Grande Dames class, hit the rocks off Roche Table but was able to clear itself and sail to fifth, nevertheless, claiming the top spot on the leaderboard for a second day.

When Clan VIII briefly lost its steering at the same spot, it infringed on the rights of Zenji, causing Zenji to miss a turning mark, but, as is the case in most such Bucket instances, the Clan crew gracefully accepted its penalty and no doubt plans to supply some drinks to the Zenji crew at the Bucket Bash later this evening.

“This was the kind of day that taxes bow and mast teams first because of the physical hoists and drops,” said Jonathan Kline, the safety officer aboard Clan VIII, “then safety officers and tacticians second because of the close quarters of the ‘wiggly’ course, with the fleets converging and crossing.”

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi

Cape Arrow won the Gazelle class today with less than six minutes separating her from second-place finisher Nilaya, but the two are inverted on the overall scoreboard for Nilaya’s advantage going into tomorrow’s final race.

 

Moonbird has the most consistent finishes (2-2) in Mademoiselle class to lead overall, with Bequia having fallen to second from first yesterday.

New to the 2014 Bucket –  The Golden Pineapple Award, Sponsored by Hotel St Barth Isle de France. The Bucket Directors have added this award to the 2014 edition of the St Barths Bucket to reward an essential element of the event, who will WIN THE PARTY?For more information, and the full list of entries, visitbucketregattas.com/stbarths/Racing concludes on Sunday March 30.Live race tracking by TracTrac enhances the Bucket experience for friends, families and fans of the Bucket. Access that link atbucketregattas.com/stbarths/dailyupdate

Whitehawk: Ketch_Neilson_King_28.0m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi — at Saint Barth.

Whitehawk: Ketch_Neilson_King_28.0m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi at Saint Barth.