Les Voiles de Saint Barth Fleet

Les Voiles de Saint Barth Fleet (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

They wanted it and they got it! After the pleasure of the strong contrasts of the first day of the very first edition of the Voiles de Saint Barth, where they found the wind they were looking for and some demanding conditions, the 23 crews taking part really wanted to get going again this morning. They quite simply wanted to be out on the water as soon as possible to line up at the start between the Sugar Loaf and Saint-Jean Island, so they might enjoy another day of sailing, which they knew would prove to be exceptional.

With the promise of a well-established easterly trade wind blowing at twenty knots or more being fulfilled, as soon as the starting gun was fired a little after eleven this morning local time, the tone was set and the crews had to do their best with the sail choices they had made to get the most out of their boat in the breeze. The final buoy in the harbour entrance in Gustavia saw some real acrobatics out on the water, when the wind strengthened from the nearby hillsides to send some off course and others to come to a sudden standstill. With everyone hiking out, and with the seaspray flying, the whole fleet soon disappeared, moving well away from the coast heading for Nègre Point. The sea was whipped up by the powerful trade wind into a choppy mess, and as they approached Coco Island and the Soube Rocks, the waves built to reach almost three metres in some places. Nothing could disturb however the serenity of the big boats racing, led over this first stretch of the 35-mile long course by the amazing all-woman crew of the Class W 76 “White Wings”. “Rambler” and “Sojana”, were fully satisfied in these conditions, which were able to reveal their full potential. They kept within a few lengths of each other, accompanied by “Puffy”, the Swan 45 belonging to Patrick Demarchelier, which could really take advantage of these conditions and the incredible J 122 “Lost Horizon” which came here from Antigua. Today’s course led the fleet in what were spectacular conditions around the whole island and its rocky isles, before finishing in beauty with a long downwind run windward of Forked Island…

Sojana (Photo by Christophe Jouany  / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Sojana (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Interview with Loïck Peyron:
Why did you decide to come and sail here?
You can’t explain it. It just seemed the obvious thing to do; St. Barts is a picture postcard location. I usually only end up in the West Indies at the finish of a transatlantic race, and with all the tiredness that has built up, I normally want just one thing and that is to go home as soon as I can. This week, I can really enjoy my stay. There’s the wind, blue seas, and some fine boats… Hardly anything has in fact changed since the last time I was here ten years or more ago. Just a few more big boats. It’s a fantastic place. We’re really fortunate to be able to sail in the Caribbean.

Does this event, the Voiles de Saint-Barth offer you a break in your calendar?
The timing is just perfect for me. I’ve just had a really great time and have been through a great adventure. It was a fabulous period in my life being with one of the best sailing teams in the world with Alinghi just a few weeks ago. This week I’m taking a little break. And I’ll soon be starting the new season on small, very fast catamarans with the Oman Sail team in the framework of the Extreme 40 Championship in Europe, and on the D35s on the Swiss lakes.

Oman Sail seems to be very dynamic?
There’s a lot going on with Oman Sail. I’m lucky to have been with them for over a year now. Oman has a real maritime history and it’s interesting to see them finding this past again with their nautical traditions. The Oman sailors are keen to learn. It’s time for me to share my modest experience.

So here you’re taking part aboard Sojana…
Sojana is a very elegant monohull, which belongs to a very elegant gentleman with a nice personality.

I’d already seen the boat in Saint-Tropez and now I’m discovering her from the inside; I like the way she sails so smoothly without any pressure. Peter Holmberg is at the helm. He was also a helmsman for Alinghi. So there are two former helmsmen from Alinghi aboard Sojana. Everything is very serious on board, as with such a big boat any mistake is serious. You really need to pay attention to every little detail. I’m in charge of trimming at the mizzen mast, and I work in close collaboration with the helmsman. The whole crew has a very high level. We’re battling it out with a real racing boat, Rambler, and it’s a huge challenge. With a little more wind, 20 knots, we hope to be able to get up there with them.

What do you think about the Voiles de Saint-Barth?
The setting is magnificent. If the Voiles de Saint-Barth didn’t exist, someone would have to invent it. It’s in place now and they have intelligently brought together all sorts of boats. It’s fascinating watching them all sailing together. Everything that makes sailing so interesting can be found here and the concept has a great future ahead of it.

What they said:
Jacques Vincent (Sojana): “The English speakers on board and there are a lot of them, were amazed by the course, which was much more varied and interesting than during the Bucket regatta. The boats are able to show what they can do in the strong trade wind, and Sojana has shown off her superb qualities in every point of sail. We were up to eighteen knots under gennaker. The heavy swell on the windward side of the island did not worry us at all, as our hull seems to cope very well with these conditions. The atmosphere on board is very calm. It’s one of the characteristics of the boat’s owner, Peter Harrison. We have a top class guest on board, a certain Loïck Peyron, who is in charge of trimming at the mizzen mast…”

White Wings With An All Women Crew (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

White Wings With An All Women Crew (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Tania Thevenaz (White Wings): There are three French speakers in this all-woman crew aboard the big classic yacht, White Wings, one from Quebec and one from Switzerland, and the blonde sailor Tania Thevenaz: “We are very close in terms of performance and quality to our sistership Wild Horses. Yesterday we did not make any mistakes in wind conditions that were at the limit for us. It was a challenge that the girls rose to, in spite of manoeuvres being tough in the powerful trade wind. We really enjoyed ourselves on these varied courses, which enable us to visit all the hidden secrets of the island. We’ve really got into the “Voiles de Saint-Barth” and we’re going to continue to improve throughout the week…”

Peter Holmberg (Sojana): I was one of the first skippers that Luc Poupon contacted to take part in the Voiles de Saint-Barth. It seemed like an interesting concept to me. I wanted to lend a hand to get the event going. I’m pleased to be here.

Each island has its own race and St. Barts seems to me to be a major sailing festival, an occasion, which brings together all sorts of different yachts, which is a very good thing for our sport.

We selected a very fine team with Peyron and some top notch racers. Yesterday we didn’t make any mistakes. The longer the race, the more chance we have. We’re in a pattern of strong trade winds, which is good for Sojana.

The Voiles de Saint-Barth seems to have found its footing. The Committee has come up with some great courses. The starts were clear and safety came first out on the water… I’ll give them a very high score. Back on the island, there was a very relaxed atmosphere last night with some nice music. Once again it was a great success.

St. Barts has grown very wisely. It has kept its personality. St. Barts is unique, a special place. It is magnificent here with some really friendly people. I’ve seen a lot of changes on some islands, as these islands are where I come from, and I can say that the development of St. Barts has been carried out very intelligently.

Richard Mille, Headline partner to the Voiles de Saint Barth commented . “The organisers of the Voiles de Saint-Barth can be proud of many things, not least the fact that they managed to convince and charm Richard Mille to join up as a partner to this first edition. Designed in Brittany, it is in Breuleux, near la Chaux-de-Fonds in Switzerland that the designs by this technical enthusiast come to life. Bringing together efficiency, artistic design and manufactured using a process and materials that are really special, Richard Mille watches, which are all finished by hand, enabled high class watchmaking to enter the 21st Century. Richard Mille watches are rare objects, the result of careful work to reach the absolute peak of excellence and to achieve the total perfection that their designer is looking for. Objects which you live, and you feel sensually, they bring along in harmony the latest hi-tech materials to satisfy not only a quest for beauty but also absolute comfort, offering a very light feel. Work on the shapes, the choice of materials and showing patience and taking his time, Richard Mille inspects them himself to approve them, refusing the slightest blemish to ensure these unique watches please a demanding and knowledgeable clientele. Far removed from the industrial processes, Richard Mille, who chose to name one of his creations “Les Voiles de Saint-Barth”, occupies a niche market for exceptional timepieces. ”

 

Rambler (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Rambler (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Groupe Classic (CLA) après 2 courses
1: “Wild Horses”, Donald Tofias ( (Classic / Etats Unis D’am) 2 points
2: “White Wings”, Faraday Rosenberg ( (Classic / Etats Unis D’am) 4 points
3: “Duende”, Randy West ( (Classic / Saint Barthelemy Yacht Club) 6 points
4: “Kate”, Philippe Walwyn ( (Classic / Grande-Bretagne) 9 points
Groupe Multicoques (M2K) après 2 courses
1: “Escapade”, Greg Dorland ( / Etats Unis D’am) 2 points

Groupe Racing (RAC) après 2 courses
1: “Lost Horizon”, James Dobbs ( (J 122 / Antigua) 2 points
2: “Puffy”, Patrick de Marchelier ( (Swann 45 / Saint Barthelemy Yacht Club) 4 points
3: “Malachite”, Pierre Mancy ( (A 40 / C V de St Quentin) 8 points
4: “Black Hole”, Jeroen Hin ( (First 40.7 / Great Britain) 9 points
5: “Lancelot”, John Shanholt ( (First 40.7 / Etats Unis D’am) 10 points

Groupe RACING CRUISING (R_C) après 2 courses
1: “L’esperance”, Robert Velasquez ( (First 45 F5 / Antilles Hollan) 2 points
2: “Speedy Nemo”, Raymond Magras ( (Dufour 34 / Saint Barthelemy Yacht Club) 4 points
3: “Pocket Rocket”, David Cullen ( (J 109 / Irlande) 6 points
4: “Thula”, Max Imrie ( (Baltic 39 / Etats Unis D’am) 9 points
5: “Lil’e”, Tanguy Fox ( (Requin / Saint Barthelemy Yacht Club) 10 points
6: “Corban”, Daniel Harper ( (Swann 42 / United States O) 11 points
7: “Iznogoud”, Christophe Baudoin ( (Surprise / Ctre Nautique de St Barthelemy) 15 points
8: “Baladin”, Raphael Magras ( (Feeling 30 / Saint Barthelemy Yacht Club) 16 points
9: “Ormeau”, Alain Charlot ( (Oceanis 473 / Club de Voile du Lac D’orient) 17 points
Groupe SUPER YACHT (SUP) après 2 courses
1: “Rambler”, George David ( (Maxi / Etats Unis D’am) 2 points
2: “Sojana”, Marc Fitzgerald ( (Farr 115 / Great Britain) 4 points
3: “Moneypenny”, James Schwartz ( (Swann 601 / United States O) 6 points
4: “Nix”, Nico Cortlever ( (X 612 / Suisse) 8 points

Puffy (Photo by

Puffy (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Wild Horses (Photo by Christophe Jouany  / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Wild Horses (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

A date on the calendar that is designed to last….

They were waiting for this and the St. Barts Yacht Club has done it. “They” are all those, who love elegant boats, who come to this place, where the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean come together, offering ideal sailing conditions with steady, strong breezes, turquoise seas and brilliant, warm sunshine. The friendly welcome and hospitality of St. Barts are well known. All that needed to be done was to offer a sporting challenge to encourage racers to turn up in large numbers from North America, but also from Europe, New Zealand and Australia.  A challenge, which would allow those who love sailing an opportunity to enjoy the privilege of weaving their way around in the magic waters of the island of St. Barts.

Patron of this first edition of the “Voiles”, the photographer Patrick Demarchelier, who lives on the island, is forgetting for one moment the world of fashion to escape aboard his Swan: “I’ve been enjoying sailing in these waters for a long time. I am of course delighted that is now possible to organise an event, bringing together all the attractions of the island and the surrounding waters. “The Voiles de Saint-Barth” is clearly a wish come true, a dream being fulfilled you might say, for those, who sail in the waters of Newport, Antigua and even the Solent, who are coming here to do battle in the sunny trade winds. This first edition looks like being a huge success in every way and I do not doubt for a moment that the “Voiles de Saint Barth” will become a regular date in amongst the leading events and unmissable regattas of the international yachting calendar.”

For many years, the French sailor, Lionel Péan has been at the helm of Sojana, belonging to the British owner Peter Harrison. The big Farr-designed ketch has been a regular at yachting events in the Mediterranean and in Central America since 2003 and Lionel Péan is pleased to be in charge of Sojana this week in these waters that he knows so well and that he considers to be the most attractive you can find anywhere in the yachting world. “When the trade wind is blowing steadily in strength and direction, which looks like being the case this week, there are many possibilities open to the Race Committee for setting up tactically interesting races. There’s going to be some fine racing and that is something I enjoy…especially when we’re in warm waters,” Lionel concluded with a smile.

Sojana and Moneypenny (Photo by Christophe Jouany  / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Sojana and Moneypenny (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Various courses in the trade wind
“The high-pressure area will guarantee that we’ll be in a trade wind that is steady in strength and direction” Luc Poupon, race director, appears to be very relaxed as he knows the island and the moods of the wind gods well.  Indeed, the trade wind has been blowing strongly from the north east since the start of the week and looks like lasting throughout the regatta, “veering a little bit easterly in the middle of the week”.  So we can look forward to everything going without a hitch and the race directors have already drawn up no fewer than twenty different courses along the coast and around St. Barts, with the aim of ensuring a fair fight between the five classes taking part.  Their choice will determine what sort of challenge the thirty crews will face this week. “There aren’t really any traps in the courses we have chosen” added Luc Poupon. “It takes a very long period of trade winds for any current phenomena to appear around the points. Our races are based around the islands and rocks. The sailors know the local phenomena in our waters, with wind shadows and acceleration around the headlands. However, they will have to be careful to avoid the shallows, and therefore keep away from the temptation of getting close to the beaches.”  The longest course is 32 miles and the shortest 15.  It will of course be the strength of the wind that will determine each morning the course for that day. Luc Poupon and his team reserve the right to send the smaller boats on a shorter course, if the bigger boats are able to keep up high averages and cover the course at high speed.

 

Peter "Spike" Doriean (Photo by Movistar / Volvo Ocean Race)

Peter "Spike" Doriean (Photo by Movistar / Volvo Ocean Race)

The American, Kenny Reed, skipper of the Maxi Puma turned up this morning aboard Rambler, but was clearly shocked by the tragic loss of Peter ‘Spike’ Doriean, who died in an accident Monday 5th April, apparently after slipping over and falling to the floor in his bathroom in Saint-Martin. The 90-foot Reichel-Pugh designed Rambler (ex-Alfa Romeo I) is one of the stars that people are looking forward to seeing at the Voiles de Saint-Barth. Kenny Reed stated that his crew were very distressed, but that it was the will of Spike’s close ones that his memory should be honoured by them taking part in the event. So it is with great sadness and with their friend and fellow crewman on their minds that the sailors on Rambler will be taking part in this first edition of the “Voiles de Saint Barth”.

Peter “Spike” Doriean, a well known Australian sailor and extremely talented professional crewman died in an accident yesterday in his hotel in Saint-Martin. Aged 38, he had taken part in many top class international races. Trimmer on Movistar in the 2005-2006 Volvo Ocean Race and member of the News Corp team in 2001-2002, he was also a regular in the TP 52 circuit on Audi Q8, in the America’s Cup and took part in several Sydney-Hobart races.

Saint Barths (Photo by Christophe Jouany  / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Saint Barths (Photo by Christophe Jouany / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Yachts in St Barths (Photo courtesy of Laurent BENOIT / Les Voiles de Saint Barth )

Yachts in St Barths (Photo courtesy of Laurent BENOIT / Les Voiles de Saint Barth )

All those who love fine yachting races in the wonderful setting of the Caribbean will have their eyes firmly focused on St. Barts from today when the first edition of the Voiles gets underway.

Since 1992 and the now legendary Loulou’s regatta, never has the sailing community on the island been so involved.
With the support of all the local bodies and the business community they are working to enable these turquoise waters once again to offer superb racing in the sunshine for the pleasure of sailors, who have come from all over the world.
Thirty beautiful yachts and almost 200 sailors have turned up for this maiden event, which is set to become a regular on the Caribbean racing calendar.

Wind, sunshine, a festive and relaxed welcome, in conjunction with some serious race organisation are the ingredients which François Tolède of the St Barts Yacht Club and his 45 volunteers are counting on to ensure that skippers and owners continue to enjoy themselves.

This return of sailing to St. Barts is in itself quite an event, explained François Tolède.
From this first year we want to please sailors and partners and ensure that the organisation goes smoothly, as they will be our best ambassadors to other yachtsmen. The island magic is already working ashore.Everything is planned out on the water, in particular in terms of safety, so that the event is a happy one both at sea and back on shore…

The first warning signal planned for 11.00am local time (5.00pm GMT).

Entry List

HAMILTON II   GBR 117L BRIAND/CNB 115′ ____________  
SOJANA     FARR 115    
CABOCHON     TED FONTAINE 93′    
DSK   ITA 490 SWAN 90 FD/ 90    
LEOPARD   GBR 1R FARR 100′    
RAMBLER   USA CUSTOM MAXI 90′    
Classic
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA    
LONE FOX       20 m    
NADA   K37 6M JI      
NORTHERLIGHT     FRANS MARS 61′    
KATE   E5 INTERNATIONAL 12 60    
WILD HORSE   WUS-1   76′    
WHITE WINGS   W76   76′    
TARU   U40 GAFF SLOOP/ 40′    
JUNO     Nat Benjamin 20 m    
DUENDE     HERRESHOF 43    
Racing
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA    
TIENBE     FARR 36,7    
WILD AT HEART   HKG 1382 JOD 35 35    
MALACHITE   USA 2008 ARCHAMBAULT 40 40′    
LEE OVERLAY PARTENERS     COOKSON /FARR 50    
VICTOR     SWAN 45 45    
SPEEDY NEMO     DUFOUR 34 ,  
SONODIA III     ARCHAMBAULT 40 40    
PUFFY   USA 45454 SWAN 45 45    
LOST HORIZON     J 122      
SONIS OF AYR   GBR 370L SANTA CRUZ 37 37′    
SPIRIT OF MINERVA   GBR 865  FARR 65 65′    
MYSTERY   GBR4707R BENETEAU 40.7 41′    
WILD   M30 KIWI 35′    
Racing-cruising
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA    
KRISS     VATON 20 m    
MAGIC CARPET       34    
BLACK HOLE     BENETEAU 40.5 40    
NIBULA   B 666 SYDNEY 47/ FARR 47    
LOS B     SWAN 65 65    
VANILLE   FRA 16261 FIRST 300 SPIRIT 30    
NIX   IVB 612 X-YACHT 60′    
LIL’E   FRA479 REQUIN      
MONEYPENNY   61007 SWAN 601 60    
ORMEAU     OC 473 47′    
BALADIN     KIRIE 30′    
POCKET ROCKET GRN 7777 J 109 34.4    
TULA   000 BALTIC 39′    
ESPERENCE   123 BENETEAU 45F5 45 ‘    
racing-multihull
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA    
KARIBUNI JHONNY BEGOOD   NED 22 TRIMARAN 45 ‘    
ESCAPADE   5212 CATANA 52′    
TRI 60     VAN PETEGHEM      
Ranger Upwind Sailing (Photo By George Bekris)

Ranger Upwind Sailing (Photo By George Bekris)

After all was said and done, it was the J-Class Ranger  that took the 2010 Bucket.  John Williams and his crew raced consistently and well, earning a well-deserved victory.   Second place belonged to the the Perini Navi Andromeda la Dea, with the Perini Navi P2 in third place overall.

The third and final race of the 2010 St. Barths Bucket (the “Wrong Way Around” course) was sailed in conditions very similar to the previous days: fluky winds in the 10 to 15 knot range.  The usual noon start was preceded by a couple of Bucket Scholarship holders, thus spoiling Gloria’s virtual deadlock on the Escargot Cup, which was awarded to the consistently sailed Toto.  P2 and Unfurled earned second and third place in the Gazelle fleet, while Axia and Hetairos were runners up in the Grande Dames contingent. 

It would be a mere redundancy to add that the sailing and the shore side activities were of the customary caliber, with Visione a hands-down winner of the yacht open house on Friday night — after all the rest of the fleet had closed she kept the party going until midnight!  We expected marvelous sailing (this is, after all, the Caribbean) and indeed we got it.  The combination of St. Barths, 39 megayachts, and the blue skies and waters worked their usual magic!

As Tony Hambrook, Managing Director of Alloy Yacht stated, “This was the best regatta ever, anywhere!”

Results: Race 3 

 
Race 3
Points
Finish Time
Time Delta
   
ANDROMEDA LA DEA
1
3:21:25 PM
0:00:00
RIELA
2
3:24:27 PM
0:03:02
HELIOS
3
3:25:10 PM
0:03:45
METEOR
4
3:26:06 PM
0:04:41
ANTARA
5
3:28:03 PM
0:06:38
AVALON
6
3:29:38 PM
0:08:13
GEORGIA
7
3:30:50 PM
0:09:25
GLORIA
8
3:33:16 PM
0:11:51
DSK
9
3:37:26 PM
0:16:01
RANGER
10
3:37:42 PM
0:16:17
REBECCA
11
3:38:49 PM
0:17:24
LIARA
12
3:39:29 PM
0:18:04
UNFURLED
13
3:39:43 PM
0:18:18
SALUTE
14
3:40:22 PM
0:18:57
HIGHLAND BREEZE
15
3:40:45 PM
0:19:20
P2
16
3:41:15 PM
0:19:50
VARSOVIE
17
3:41:16 PM
0:19:51
SALPERTON IV
18
3:42:01 PM
0:20:36
WHITE WINGS
19
3:42:11 PM
0:20:46
AXIA
20
3:43:18 PM
0:21:53
SOJANA
21
3:44:56 PM
0:23:31
WHISPER
22
3:46:17 PM
0:24:52
GANESHA
23
3:47:35 PM
0:26:10
VISIONE
24
3:47:58 PM
0:26:33
GHOST
25
3:48:31 PM
0:27:06
ADELA
26
3:48:43 PM
0:27:18
HANUMAN
27
3:48:44 PM
0:27:19
SAUDADE
28
3:48:56 PM
0:27:31
MYSTERY**
29
3:49:04 PM
0:27:39
ARTEMIS
30
3:49:39 PM
0:28:14
WINDCREST
31
3:50:33 PM
0:29:08
HETAIROS
32
3:52:05 PM
0:30:40
SHAMOUN
33
3:52:26 PM
0:31:01
HYPERION
34
3:53:45 PM
0:32:20
DESTINATION
35
3:53:50 PM
0:32:25
HAMILTON II
36
3:53:59 PM
0:32:34
SYMMETRY
37
4:01:29 PM
0:40:04
TOTO
38
4:33:55 PM
1:12:30
BARACUDA
39
DNF
 

* Safety Penalty: 5 Minute
** Over Early Penalty: 5 Minute

Results: Cumulative

 
Race 1
Points
Race 2
Points
Race 3
Points
Total
Points
 Rank
RANGER
13
1
10
24
1
ANDROMEDA LA DEA
4
26
1
31
2
P2
10
5
16
31
3
AXIA
3
11
20
34
4
UNFURLED
19
4
13
36
5
GANESHA
7
10
23
40
6
GEORGIA
9
25
7
41
7
AVALON
5
31
6
42
8
REBECCA
30
2
11
43
9
SAUDADE
8
8
28
44
10
DSK
20
15
9
44
11
SALUTE
2
29
14
45
12
GHOST
17
3
25
45
13
HANUMAN
12
6
27
45
14
WHITE WINGS
6
20
19
45
15
HETAIROS
1
13
32
46
16
HELIOS
24
23
3
50
17
ANTARA
11
34
5
50
18
RIELA
16
35
2
53
19
WINDCREST
14
9
31
54
20
LIARA
28
14
12
54
21
VISIONE
26
7
24
57
22
SOJANA
29
12
21
62
23
ADELA
18
19
26
63
24
HAMILTON II
15
16
36
67
25
WHISPER
23
22
22
67
26
VARSOVIE
34
17
17
68
27
METEOR
36
33
4
73
28
SALPERTON IV
27
28
18
73
29
HIGHLAND BREEZE
32
27
15
74
30
HYPERION
22
18
34
74
31
MYSTERY
25
21
29
75
32
BARACUDA
21
24
40
85
33
GLORIA
39
39
8
86
34
ARTEMIS
33
32
30
95
35
SHAMOUN
35
30
33
98
36
DESTINATION
31
36
35
102
37
SYMMETRY
37
38
37
112
38
TOTO
38
37
38
113
39

 

A full recap of the St. Barths Bucket and Race Information about the Upcoming Newport Bucket Regatta is available at  www.bucketregattas.com

  
Ranger Head On (Photo by George Bekris)

Ranger Head On (Photo by George Bekris)

 

J-Class Ranger (Photo by George Bekris)

J-Class Ranger (Photo by George Bekris)

 

Who would have guessed that all those navigating fluid libations we so freely poured to Poseidon a few years back (in the days of windless Buckets) would bear compounded interest.  Once again — we sailed in near perfect conditions, under proper Caribbean blue skies.  The word “near” is used advisedly, as the day saw wind speeds ranging from 8 to 15 knots, with direction swings from SE to NE.  This, needless to say, scrambled some otherwise predictable finishes and may well have been a cause of some frustration. 

The 39 yachts were sent off in close formation, with tight starts sometimes a mere 30 seconds apart.  The traditional second day “Wiggley Course” was revised into the “Not So Wiggley” course in the interest of safety, although the dramatic wind shifts reintroduced some of the Wiggles back into the equation. 

In the end it looked like a photo finish between Ranger and Rebecca until the latter hit a wall in the form of a massive header, allowing Ranger claim a well deserved first place.  Some liberal interpretations of the safety protocol for finishing yachts provided some interesting finishing tactics, although good general seamanship avoided any potential problems. 

The traditional owners’ party was again held at the Carl Gustaf Hotel which offered a beautiful view of the fleet below, followed by general merriment on the quay.  Sunday’s race, the “Wrong Way Around” course, promises to enjoy more good weather and lovely sailing for all.

Results: Cumulative

 
Race 1
Points
Race 2
Points
Race 3
Points
Total
Points
 Rank
RANGER
13
1
 
14
1
HETAIROS
1
13
 
14
2
AXIA
3
11
 
14
3
P2
10
5
 
15
4
SAUDADE
8
8
 
16
5
GANESHA
7
10
 
17
6
HANUMAN
12
6
 
18
7
GHOST
17
3
 
20
8
UNFURLED
19
4
 
23
9
WINDCREST
14
9
 
23
10
WHITE WINGS
6
20
 
26
11
ANDROMEDA LA DEA
4
26
 
30
12
SALUTE
2
29
 
31
13
HAMILTON II *
15
16
 
31
14
REBECCA
30
2
 
32
15
VISIONE
26
7
 
33
16
GEORGIA
9
25
 
34
17
DSK
20
15
 
35
18
AVALON
5
31
 
36
19
ADELA
18
19
 
37
20
HYPERION*
22
18
 
40
21
SOJANA
29
12
 
41
22
LIARA
28
14
 
42
23
ANTARA
11
34
 
45
24
BARACUDA
21
24
 
45
25
WHISPER
23
22
 
45
26
MYSTERY
25
21
 
46
27
HELIOS
24
23
 
47
28
RIELA
16
35
 
51
29
VARSOVIE
34
17
 
51
30
SALPERTON IV
27
28
 
55
31
HIGHLAND BREEZE*
32
27
 
59
32
SHAMOUN
35
30
 
65
33
ARTEMIS
33
32
 
65
34
DESTINATION
31
36
 
67
35
METEOR
36
33
 
69
36
TOTO
38
37
 
75
37
SYMMETRY **
37
38
 
75
38
GLORIA
39
39
 
78
39

* Safety Penalty: 5 Minute
** Over Early Penalty: 5 Minute

  

Hetairos (Photo by George Bekris)

Hetairos (Photo by George Bekris)

 

The first race of the 2010 St. Barths Bucket was blessed with a crystalline Caribbean day that served up a 13 knot easterly breeze and smooth seas for the record fleet of 39 superyachts, to race the 25 miles counterclockwise around the island.  This set the stage for a magnificent day on the water and remarkably close racing, with 30 of 39 yachts finishing within 16 minutes!

 

The big winner of the day was HETAIROS, the 132′ Abeking and Rasmussen ketch that sailed the course flawlessly.  SALUTE, the 184′ Perini Navi which is the tallest sloop rig yacht afloat, finished three minutes later to claim second with AXIA, the 124′ Palmer Johnson finishing third, four minutes later.

In the racing division, “Les Gazelles des Mers”, SAUDADE  the 148′ Wally finished first, with P2, the 125′ Performance Perini Navi sloop claiming second just over a minute behind.  The J Class yachts, Hanuman and Ranger, finished third and fourth just a minute later, with only 21 seconds between them after 25 miles of racing! 

Last night’s festivities in St. Barths was centered around the fleet Open House, the highlight of the weekend during which the nearly 1,000 participating crewmembers will visit and celebrate the day aboard the yachts. 

 

Race #2 of the St. Barths Bucket Regatta will take place today on “The Not So Wiggly Course” around and between the islands northeast of St. Barths. 

Race Entries

 

Boat Name Length Builder/Designer
Adela 180’ Pendennis Rebuild
Andromeda La Dea 154’ Perini Navi
Antara 154’ Perini Navi
Artemis 144′ Dubois/Fitzroy Yachts
Avalon 108’ Southern Pacific Yachts
Axia 124’ Palmer Johnson
Baracuda 164’ Perini Navi
Destination Fox Harbr 134′ Alloy Yachts/Dubois
DSK 90′ Swan
Ganesha 128′ Dubois/Fitzroy Yachts
Georgia 159′ Alloy Yachts
Gloria 126′ Jongert & Lowland
Ghost 122′ Vitters Shipyard
Hamilton II 117′ CNB
Hanuman 138′ Royal Huisman
Helios 148′ Perini Navi
Hetairos 132′ Abeking & Rasmussen
Highland Breeze 112′ Swan
Hyperion 156′ Royal Huisman
Liara 100′ Performance Yachts
Meteor 169′ Royal Huisman
Mystery 112′ Swan
P2 125′ Perini Navi
Ranger 137′ J Boat
Rebecca 141′ Pendennis
Riela 184′ Perini Navi
Salperton IV 147′ Dubois/Fitzroy
Salute 184′ Perini Navi
Saudade 148′ Wally
Shamoun 108′ Klaasen
Sojana 115’ Custom Farr Ketch
Symmetry 96’ Yachting Development
Toto 110′ Palmer Johnson
Unfurled 112′ Royal Huisman
Varsovie 100′ Swan
Visione 148′ Baltic
Whisper 116′ Holland Jachtbouw
White Wings 76′ Rockport Marine
Windcrest 98’ Hodgdon Yachts

 

St Barth's Bucket (Photo By Cory Silken)

St Barth's Bucket (Photo By Cory Silken)

The wind gods served up a magnificent 15 knot ENE sailing breeze for the first days race of the 14th Annual St Barths Bucket Regatta Yesterday.  A record 34 yachts sailed the 25 mile course, counter-clockwise around the island.  This was a spectacular day of sailing, enhanced by a “yellow alert” warning for heavy seas and swells that left the fleet sailing against the backdrop of huge breaking seas against the rock promotories that create the turning marks for the course.  The photographers were really happy (and a little soaked) at the end of the day!

The big winner of the day was METEOR, the 51M Dykstra design Schooner by the Royal Huisman Shipyard.  Finishing 23 seconds later in second place was SHAMOUN the 33M Classic sloop by Holland Jachtbouw, with GANESHA, the new Dubois design 39M performance sloop, finishing 40 seconds later in Third Place.

Among LES GAZELLES DES MERS (racing division), GANESHA finished first, KALIKOBASS II the 32M Trehard sloop was second and  P2, the new Perini Navi  high performance 38m sloop by design, was third.  Among LES GRANDES DAMES DES MERS (Cruising Division), METEORr was first, SHAMOUN second and PERSEUS, the 50M Perini Navi was third.

The large surge and swell created some excitement alongside as well, and unfortunately made it impossible for most of the fleet to come alongside for the evening in the turbulent harbor seas.  This put a serious damper on the scheduled “Fleet Open House” which is typically the high point of each Bucket Regatta.  Fortunately, four of the largest (and most hospitable yachts) were able to tie up safely, and invite the other sailing crews aboard for a great night of celebration of the first day of racing!

Race #2 of the St. Barths Bucket Regatta was sailed today on the 20 mile “Wiggley Course” around and between the Islands north and east of St. Barths