Grundoon, Jim Grundy, St. David's Lighthouse Trophy; Glenn Family at prize giving Nic Douglass - AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com)

Grundoon, Jim Grundy, St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy; Glenn Family at prize giving Nic Douglass – AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com)

 

The St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy, Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy, and 100-plus more awards were presented to conclude the 2018 Newport Bermuda Race.

(Hamilton, Bermuda, June 24, 2018)—His Excellency, the Governor of Bermuda, John Rankin, hosted the Newport Bermuda Race Prize-Giving on Saturday, welcoming hundreds of guests to the grounds of Government House and assisting with the presentation of more than 100 awards. It was a diverse, multi-generational group of sailors who came forward to receive prizes from the Governor and Jon Corless, commodore of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, and Brad Willauer, commodore of the Cruising Club of America. James Macdonald, the RBYC Honourable Secretary, served as master of ceremonies, presenting the entire nine-page prize list.

Jim Grundy’s Grundoon won the famous St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy for the best corrected time in the largest division of 85 boats. Sailing with one daughter and two sons in the crew, Grundy, of Doylestown, Penn., made off with half a dozen other trophies including the William L. Glenn Family Participation Prize and the Dorade Trophy for vintage yachts over 25 years old. Grundy’s father purchased Grundoon, a Columbia 50, in 1968.

Wizard, a Volvo Ocean 70 owned by the Askew brothers, won the other lighthouse trophy—the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy. Finishing first on corrected time among the highest-performance boats of the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division, the Askews picked up their second major win in six months following a victory at the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race last December. David and Peter Askew are from Sandy, Utah and Riderwood, Md., respectively. There were 22 entries in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division.

Orca, an Island Packet 38 owned by Harold and Mary Guidotti, of Westbrook, Conn., won the Finisterre Division of 40 boats and received the Carleton Mitchell Finisterre Trophy. The trophy is named for the three-time winning skipper and his boat, which coincidentally was also 38 feet long.

More trophy presentation photos (all credits Nic Douglass – AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com) clockwise from top left: Yankee Girl, Zachary Lee, Philip S. Weld Prize; E. Llwyd Ecclestone, Jr., Bermuda Race Roll of Honour; Eric Best, Feo, Cook’s Award; Dreamcatcher, Mudratz team, Stephens Brothers Youth Trophy.Complete results are on the Newport Bermuda Race website where the full prize list will be posted shortly. View the online version of this release.

Trophy presentation photos (all credits Nic Douglass – AdventuresofaSailorGirl.com) clockwise from top left: Grundoon, Jim Grundy, St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy; Grundoon, Jim Grundy and family, William L. Glenn Family Participation Prize; OrcaFinisterre Trophy, Harold Guidotti; Wizard, Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy, Peter Askew.

Yankee Girl won the Philip S. Weld Prize for the best corrected time in the 15-boat Double-Handed Division. Skipper Zachary Lee of Vineyard Haven, Mass., accepted the prize, and his crew Leif Counter, of Pelham, N.Y., received the Moxie Prize, which is awarded in recognition of the other half of the winning double-handed crew.

The Swan 48 Dreamcatcher won the Stephens Brothers Youth Prize for the best performance by a youth division crew, with most of the crew between the ages of 14 and 23. The boat was entered in the race by the Mudratz, a youth-sailing non-profit organization in Eastern Connecticut.

Completing his 23rd Newport Bermuda Race, E. Llwyd Ecclestone, Jr., of West Palm Beach, Fla., was recognized at the Prize-Giving as a new member of the Bermuda Race Roll of Honour. Reflecting on his long-time crew and years of sailing together, Ecclestone offered their three rules of offshore sailing: “Eat well, respect the watch system, and there are no heroes on the boat.”

Eric Best of Feo received the Cook’s Award for perseverance and fortitude in cooking for a racing crew longer than anyone else in the race. Skippered by Best’s daughter, Isabel, the steel Joshua 47 Feo finished in 146 hours, 54 minutes, 17 seconds, a little more than 96 hours after Rambler 88 became the first boat to finish the race.

A view of a recent Newport Bermuda Race send-off for Class 3 of the St. David’s Lighthouse Division. Photo: Daniel Forster/PPL

The 195 boats that submitted entries before the 2018 Newport Bermuda Race“application for entry” deadline are anchored by the usual excellent turnout of nearly 150 cruiser- and cruiser/racer-style boats sailing in the St. David’s Lighthouse and Finisterre (Cruiser) divisions. The race, which is co-organized by The Cruising Club of America and the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, offers several other divisions for different types of boats and competitors, which truly makes this event seven races in one.

While some pre-start attrition is normal when a fleet faces 635 ocean miles across the Gulf Stream, a diverse fleet of 180 to 190 boats should cross the line on June 15th, crewed by a mix of both professional and amateur sailors. That would make it the biggest fleet since 2010, when 193 boats finished the race.

Among the entries in St. David’s and Finisterre divisions, the 2016 success of youth sailors guided by adult advisors aboard High Noon (link) has led to four entries by youth teams in 2018. There will also be new divisions of Multihulls and Superyachts, which have added seven boats to the fleet, the largest of which is the 112-foot Sparkman & Stephens design, Kawil.

Another key to the high entry total is the 20 boats entered in the Gibbs Hill Division, which is for high-performance racing boats that in many cases are steered and crewed professionally. Recognizing advances in offshore racing technology, the Bermuda Race Organizing Committee allowed entry this year by boats carrying water-ballasting systems and certain types of canting keels. In past years, Gibbs Hill typically has drawn 10 to 15 entries; in 2016, based on the high winds forecast in the days before the race, all of the Gibbs Hill entries elected not to compete.

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

“The BROC remains committed to the value of the race as an adventure and participation for its own sake,” says Jonathan Brewin, the event chairman and past commodore of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club. “The race is different than many competitions; it’s a chance to compete for an array of permanent trophies and be part of a history going back to 1906,” says Brewin, “but above all it’s a chance to challenge oneself and one’s crew to prepare to compete safely offshore at the highest level.”

 

Newport Bermuda Race Start (Photo by George Bekris)

The introduction of a Multihull Division was three years in development, and based on the standards adopted for 2018, not every multihull will be eligible to compete. Collaborating with an experienced cadre of multihull designers and sailors, the Cruising Club of America’s safety committee developed new ocean-racing safety standards for participating multihulls and set more rigorous safety training requirements than for monohull crews. In addition, the BROC collaborated with the Offshore Racing Association to create a new VPP handicap system for multihulls (ORR-MH) that was successfully tested in the 2017 Transpac Race.

See BermudaRace.com for news updates on the race. See Official Notice Board for current list of entries.

Genuine Risk At Start Of Bermuda Race (Photo by George Bekris )