Bella Mente, JV 72 Custom, USA45. Class IRC Z & CSA 1 (Hap Fauth and his team on Maxi 72 Bella Mente competing in the 2017 RORC Caribbean 600 (Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography)

Bella Mente, JV 72 Custom, USA45. Class IRC Z & CSA 1 (Hap Fauth and his team on Maxi 72 Bella Mente competing in the 2017 RORC Caribbean 600
(Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography)

ANTIGUA, WEST INDIES (February 24, 2017) – Bella Mente Racing, led by owner/driver Hap Fauth, launched its 2017 campaign season with a major victory this week, winning IRC Overall, CSA Overall and CSA 1 at the RORC Caribbean 600 in Antigua; The team took home the coveted RORC Caribbean 600 Trophy for the IRC win as well as the Bella Mente Trophy, the team’s namesake award, for being the first IRC yacht to finish that is wholly manually powered. The 600-mile offshore race hosted a record number of competitors for its 2017 edition, with over 80 yachts hitting the waters off Antigua, but it was the battle between Bella Mente and rival Maxi 72 Proteus that took the spotlight. The yachts dueled up until the very end, with the lead switching hands on several occasions. After over two days at sea, Bella Mente ultimately prevailed, crossing the finish line on Wednesday, February 22 at 4:51 p.m. (AST), ahead of Proteus.

Bella Mente, JV 72 Custom, USA45. Class IRC Z & CSA 1 Hap (Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography

Bella Mente, JV 72 Custom, USA45. Class IRC Z & CSA 1 Hap
(Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography)

“This is such an important event for our campaign each year so it was just the best to be able to come back swinging,” said Fauth adding that this year’s RORC Caribbean 600 win was exceptionally sweet for the team, which came to the event last year hoping to defend its 2015 IRC Overall win, but were forced to retire halfway into racing due to keel troubles. “We’re looking forward to the rest of our 2017 season and ultimately the Rolex Maxi 72 World Championships in Sardinia. That is what the whole season is focused on from here.

Bella Mente, JV 72 Custom, USA45. Class IRC Z & CSA 1 (Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography

Bella Mente, JV 72 Custom, USA45. Class IRC Z & CSA 1
(Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography

“It was a very hard fought win. Over the course of the race, the team performed 85 sail changes and all but one were executed perfectly. The crew gave a 120 percent and we got a victory out of it – a crew and afterguard-driven victory.”


The Bella Mente Racing Team after winning IRC Overall at the 2017 RORC Caribbean 600 (left) and Owner/Driver Hap Fauth accepting the RORC Caribbean 600 Trophy (right)
(Photo Credit Left: RORC/Ted Martin / Photo Credit Right: RORC/ELWJ Photography)

The 600-mile race circumnavigates 11 Caribbean islands, starting its fleet off Fort Charlotte in Antigua and then taking it north up to Barbuda and around Nevis, St. Kitts, St. Eustatius, Saba, St. Barth and St. Martin before heading south for Guadeloupe. From there, the fleet returns to Barbuda and rounds Redonda before finishing back in Antigua.

“Our playbook was pretty extensive for this race with this being our fifth RORC Caribbean 600 racing Bella Mente, however it was based on the trade winds blowing as they normally do this time of year,” said the team’s offshore helmsman Mike Sanderson adding that though the RORC Caribbean 600 racecourse was the same as previous years, the fleet experienced a completely different wind direction, which changed the tactics and dynamic onboard. That, coupled with intense competition with Proteus, made for an extremely tough race. “This year the wind conditions did a 180 in comparison to previous years, which made for an entirely different race. For me, that was the best part of this year’s event. It’s always great to have a new challenge because it means we really have to do our homework to prepare for the race. When we got out there on the course, everything looked so different going around the track even though we were in familiar surroundings.”


Maxi 72s Bella Mente and Proteus battling it out on the racecourse in the 2017 RORC Caribbean 600
(Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography)

Tactician Terry Hutchinson added, “It was an absolute battle all the way through. Proteus got the better of us in the pre-start and on the first leg up to Barbuda, but we did a good job of keeping it close, and one rain shower later we were bow-to-stern with the Maxi 72. For the next 450 miles we were tied to the hip. Proteus held the lead through to La Désirade (off Guadeloupe), but when we started on the 90-mile leg back to Barbuda, Bella Mente’s upwind speed shined and we were able to slip around Proteus and extend.  From Barbuda to the finish we were constantly looking over our shoulder; our lead never felt big enough and we were preparing for one more parking lot with no breeze on the racecourse ahead. In true Bella Mente form, a couple of slick sail changes at the end of our 53 hours on the water got us across the finish line.”

When asked how he thought the team performed for their first event of the season, Hutchinson responded, “The team fared well, but we have a lot of work to do. The competition this season is very good, and so like in 2016 we need to apply a consistent process to our performance and development, and allow Bella Mente’s number one resource, our people, to perform.”


The Bella Mente Racing Team celebrates dockside in Antigua after their 2017 RORC Caribbean 600 win
(Photo Credit: RORC/ELWJ Photography)

Bella Mente will compete in one more event in the Caribbean, Les Voiles de. St. Barth in April, before the yacht is shipped across the Atlantic to race in Mallorca, Spain for the Palma Vela in May. The team will then relocate to Corfu, Greece for the inaugural Corfu Challenge in July and return to Mallorca for the Copa del Rey MAPFRE later that month. The season culminates with its final and most significant event, the Rolex Maxi 72 World Championship in Porto Cervo, Italy in September.

For more information, visit http://bellamenteracing.com/. Follow Bella Mente Racing on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

 

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Inoui (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Bella Mente, Open Season, H20, Supernikka, Windfall and Inoui division winners
Porto Cervo, 12 September 2015. Eighteen knots of scirocco wind and a rip-roaring race around the islands on the final day of the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup & Rolex Maxi 72 World Championship provided the perfect end to a superlative week of competition in Porto Cervo. The 26th edition of the event, which attracted a fleet of 40 yachts ranging from 18 to 66 metres in length, was organized by Yacht Club Costa Smeralda together with title sponsor Rolex and the International Maxi Association.

Hap Fauth's Bella Mente (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Hap Fauth’s Bella Mente (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Hap Fauth’s Bella Mente, with a bullet and a third place in today’s two windward-leeward races, was crowned Rolex Maxi 72 World Champion 2015. The American team which boasts Terry Hutchinson on tactics managed to whisk victory from the grasp of Roberto Tomasini Grinover with his Robertissima III by just one point. Dieter Schön’s Momo claimed third place in her debut on the waters of the Costa Smeralda.

 

Maxi 72's at start (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Maxi 72’s at start (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

“It was just fantastic,” enthused a delighted Hap Fauth, “The level of competition was so high and everyone had fun. We had a great time and the organization and hospitality was excellent.”
At the conclusion of a coastal course of approximately 30 nautical miles Marco Vogele’s 33-metre Inoui was able to celebrate her victory over Viriella and Hetairos respectively in the Supermaxi division. Newly elected IMA President Thomas Bscher was also celebrating in the Wally division as his Open Season rounded off a week of near-perfect results with a second place in today’s race to claimed overall victory in the Wally division. After a fierce battle for second place throughout the week, Magic Carpet Cubed, owned by Sir Lindsay Owen Jones, took the silver prize with J One in third place on equal points.

 

Windfall (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Windfall (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

The record-breaking 100-foot Comanche, owned by Jim Clark and Kristy Hinze-Clark, gave spectacular performances throughout the week and word is she will be joined by several more pure racing machines for the next edition of the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup.

(Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

(Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

In the Maxi division, which together with the Mini Maxis completed a slightly shorter coastal course, The Southern Wind yacht Windfall, owned by Michael Cotter claimed the Rolex prize and timepiece. Following an event-long leadership battle, Masimiliano Florio’s Grande Orazio Pioneer Investments had to settle for second place, just one point behind. The Swan 77 Tugela rounded off the podium finishers.
Thanks to a victory in today’s race Riccardo di Michele’s H2O managed to beat Shirlaf on countback as both yachts finished with the same score. Third place in the Mini Maxi RC/SOT division went to Wallyño.

The Mini Maxi Racing Division saw Roberto Lacorte’s 2015-launched Supernikka perform consistently well throughout the week to take first place overall ahead of Britain’s Spectre and Maximilian Klink’s Caro.
“It may seem redundant to say that this was a wonderful event – the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup is always a highlight of our sporting calendar – however this 26th edition of the regatta was truly exceptional.” Commented YCCS Commodore Riccardo Bonadeo “The fleet, the owners and the crews were all of an incredibly high standard and mother nature stepped in to provide almost perfect conditions.”

WALLY 77 J ONE, WALLY 94 GALMA AND 100FT COMANCHE (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

WALLY 77 J ONE, WALLY 94 GALMA AND 100FT COMANCHE (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Looking forward to the next Maxi event Bonadeo continued “The conclusion of a perfect event seems the perfect time to invite you all, if you haven’t already done so, to enrol for the very first edition of the Maxi Yacht Rolex Caribbean Cup taking place in April 2016 at our Caribbean home in Virgin Gorda where we are lucky enough to have another beautiful regatta course and constant trade winds.”
The YCCS calendar in the Mediterranean continues with the Sailing Champions League final which will see teams from across Europe and beyond competing on J70 boats from 18th to 20th September.

See all the results HERE

Wallys and Comanche (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Wallys and Comanche (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

A spectacular start to the 2015 RORC Caribbean 600 in Antigua as IRC Zero and Canting Keel class, including George David's Rambler 88 and John Elkann's Volvo 70, Maserati cross the line (Photo  ©Tim Wright/Photoaction.com)

A spectacular start to the 2015 RORC Caribbean 600 in Antigua as IRC Zero and Canting Keel class, including George David’s Rambler 88 and John Elkann’s Volvo 70, Maserati cross the line (Photo ©Tim Wright/Photoaction.com)

A spectacular start to the 2015 RORC Caribbean 600 in Antigua as IRC Zero and Canting Keel class, including George David’s Rambler 88 and John Elkann’s Volvo 70, Maserati cross the line ©Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

 66 yachts started the 7th edition of the RORC Caribbean 600, with hundreds of race fans watching the impressive fleet from Fort Charlotte and Shirley Heights. Thousands more are now glued to the tracker and social media feeds. After a classic start in 15 knots of easterly trade winds, the fleet powered past the Pillars of Hercules, heading for Green Island where they will bear away and accelerate towards Barbuda, the only mark of the 600-mile course around 11 stunning Caribbean islands.

 

Phaedo3, Lloyd Thornburg’s MOD 70 © Richard and Rachel/Team Phaedo

Lloyd Thornburg’s MOD 70 Phaedo3, with Michel Desjoyeaux and Brian Thompson on board, had a conservative start with Petro Jonker’s cruising catamaran, Quality Time crossing the line first. Phaedo3 lit the blue touch paper at Green Island, blasting through the surf at well over 30 knots. The lime-green machine reached Barbuda in less than two hours, well ahead of record pace and eight miles ahead of Peter Aschenbrenner’s Irens 63, Paradox.

In the second start, 19 yachts in IRC Two and Three started the 600-mile race. For most of the crews racing in the smaller yachts it will be three or four days before they complete the challenge. Ed Fishwick’s Sunfast 3600, Redshift, skippered by Nick Cherry, got a great start at the pin-end with Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48, Scarlet Oyster, judging the inner distance mark to perfection. Andy Middleton’s First 47.7, EH01 and Scarlet Oyster were the first yachts in IRC Two to reach Green Island and it is likely that these two will be neck-and-neck for the duration of the race. In IRC Three, Peter Scholfield’s HOD 35, Zarafa was leading on the water at Green Island. However the Two Handed team racing Louis-Marie Dussere’s JPK 10.10, Raging Bee was the leader in class after time correction.

 

Scarlet Oyster, Ross Applebey’s Oyster 48 ©Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Jonathan Bamberger’s Canadian J/145, Spitfire and Joseph Robillard’s S&S 68, Black Watch got the best start in the 15 strong fleet racing in IRC One. However, Jose Diego-Arozamena’s Farr 72, Maximizer, revelled in the upwind start to lead on the water at Green Island. Oyster 625, Lady Mariposa, sailed by Daniel Hardy had a great leg to Green Island as did James Blakemore’s Swan 53, Music which was leading after time correction.

The penultimate start featured 21 yachts racing in IRC Zero and Canting Keel, arguably the best fleet of offshore sailing yachts that has ever been seen in the Caribbean. A highly competitive start saw Piet Vroon’s Ker 51, Tonnerre 4, win the pin, while Ron O’Hanley’s Cookson 50, Privateer took the island shore route to perfection. Farr 100, Leopard sailed by Christopher Bake, also had a great start, controlling the boats to leeward heading for the Pillars of Hercules.

 

Hap Fauth’s Maxi 72, Bella Mente had a sensational first leg of the race, rounding Green Island first out of the IRC Zero class, but all eyes were on George David’s Rambler 88, as the powerful sled turned on the after burners. George David’s new speed-machine could well break his own monohull course record; at Barbuda Rambler 88 was almost five miles ahead of the ghost track of the record set by Rambler 100.

 

George David’s Rambler 88 ©Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Two of the world’s most magnificent schooners were the last class to start. Athos and Adela started their match race in the pre-start and there is no doubt that the battle of the titans will continue throughout the race. Athos won the pre-start in some style, chasing Adela downwind and away from the line, before rounding up onto the breeze and crossing the line over a boat length ahead of her rival. However, Adela was far better suited to the beat up to Green Island and led as the two schooners continued their rivalry towards Barbuda.

 

Note: Liquid, Pamala C Baldwin’s J/122 and Quality Time, Petro Jonker’s Du Toit 51 catamaran retired at the start following boat damage. All of the crew are well.

Bella Mente, Hap Fauth’s ©Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

RACE MINISITE:
Follow the race web site: http://caribbean600.rorc.org

( Entry list HERE)

 

 

THE RACE: 

  • RORC Caribbean 600 website: http://caribbean600.rorc.org
  • The RORC Caribbean 600 starts from Antigua on Monday 23rd February 2015
  • The 600nm course circumnavigates 11 Caribbean Islands starting from Fort Charlotte, English Harbour, Antigua and heads north as far as St Martin and south to Guadeloupe taking in Barbuda, Nevis, St Kitts, Saba and St Barth’s
  • Past Results: RORC CARIBBEAN 600 TROPHY – IRC OVERALL
  • 2014 – George Sakellaris, RP72, Shockwave (USA)
  • 2013 – Ron O’Hanley, Privateer, Cookson 50 (USA)
  • 2012 – Niklas Zennström’s JV72, Rán (GBR)
    2011 – George David, Rambler 100, JK 100 (USA)
    2010 – Karl C L Kwok, Beau Geste, Farr 80 (HKG)
  • 2009 – Adrian Lee, Lee Overlay Partners, Cookson 50 (IRL)
Magnificent schooners Athos & Adela - (Photo by RORC/Tim Wright/photoaction.com)

60 yachts from 11 different countries, with 682 crew from all over the world, took part in the 6th edition of the RORC Caribbean 600 and enjoyed spectacular conditions and intense competition.

The last start of the day produced the hair-raising sight of two enormous schooners match racing each other in the last few minutes to the start, bearing down towards the Pillars of Hercules at full speed, only a boat length apart. The 182ft Adela called for water from 203ft Athos, which duly obliged, putting in a smart tack and all 300 tons of her went through the wind. The spritely 200 ton Adela smoked through the line with height and pace to effectively win the start – magnificent!The start gun sounded at Fort Charlotte, high above the Pillars of Hercules and the magnificent international fleet of yachts enjoyed a sparkling send-off with warm trade winds, Caribbean swell and brilliant sunshine.

The breath-taking course around 11 Caribbean islands provided a thrilling race track, with close racing right through the fleet, especially the battle for line honours.

Shockwave by RORC/Tim Wright/

Shockwave by RORC/Tim Wright/

2014 WINNER: SHOCKWAVE 

The closest finish for line honours in the six year history of the RORC Caribbean 600 played out on the last leg of the course. Hap Fauth’s JV72, Bella Mente, George David’s RP90, Rambler and George Sakellaris’ RP72, Shockwave were approaching Redonda – the last island of the course – in fighter formation, readying themselves for a battle royale. The adrenalin levels of the crew were peaking, but a cold beat on the rail awaited them back to the finish in Antigua. After an incredibly demanding 40 hours of non-stop action, the teams were exhausted, but digging deep to summon the energy for a last push to victory.

 

Bella Mente crossed the finish line to take Monohull Line Honours in an elapsed time of 48 hours, 5 minutes, 44 seconds. 10 minutes later, Rambler crossed the finish line in second place, swiftly followed by Shockwave which finished third on the water, just over two minutes later. On corrected time, Shockwave were eventually given the overall win and lifted the RORC Caribbean 600 Trophy.

 

“That is what ocean racing should be all about,” commented Shockwave tactician, Robbie Doyle. “Beautiful racing between three very tough competitors, all fighting it out the whole way. A heavy-weight battle without a doubt – no question. I have had great moments in sail boats, but that was as much fun as I can remember. For 600 miles we were always in touch with each other, either up a few minutes or down a few minutes, and it all came down to the last beat to finish. It was like an epic tennis match.”

 

TOUGH RACE FOR MULTIHULL WINNER 

Erick Clement’s Open 40 trimaran, Dauphin Telecom – Johnny Be Good had just three crew and the team from St.Martin had a gruelling race to take line honours and the Multihull class win; the crew had virtually no sleep, a diet of cold pasta and were drenched throughout the 600 mile course: “It was a tough race, especially at night when we really felt the cold. Just finishing the race was our goal, but we are delighted to take line honours; every racing multihull in the Caribbean should do this race and we would love to take on boats from overseas as well,” commented Erick Clement.

 

2013 OVERALL WINNER TAKES CANTING KEEL CLASS

Last year’s overall winner, Ron O’Hanley’s American Cookson 50, Privateer, won the Canting Keel Class. “This is just a great race; the RORC does a superb job organising it, of making us feel loved. That’s why it’s my favourite and why I keep coming back. It is my fourth time here and we hope to be back next year.”

EPIC BATTLE OF THE SCHOONERS

The magnificent schooners Adela and Athos enjoyed an epic battle. The match racing was incessant with the lead changing hands six times during the race. Adela and Athos were literally metres apart at Redonda where the two leviathans of the race hauled in sheets for the beat to finish. Tack-for-tack and toe-to-toe, the battle raged on to the finish. Ultimately Adela won the last leg to take line honours for the Superyacht Class and the win on corrected time. The friendly rivalry was evident on the dock as Adela deployed their loud-hailing system to broadcast three cheers for Athos, which replied with three blasts from their deafening horns.Greg Perkins, skipper of Adela, was full of praise for his crew and Athos: “An amazing race; Athos is quicker off the wind than us but we’re quicker upwind, so we passed each other at each mark. Going round Redonda, they were within two boat lengths of us and then we managed to pull away on the last leg. Hats off to Athos, they are getting faster and faster and I don’t know if we can keep up with them in the future. I think they sailed really well which made it an amazing experience – two schooners match racing around 600 miles in the Caribbean – you can’t ask for much more than that. I’m very proud of the boys who did a fantastic job; the crew work was flawless. I’ve had this team together for quite some time, which makes such a difference. The important thing when manoeuvring a boat like Adela with two headsails, two mainsails and runners on each of the masts is coordination; it’s such a powerful beast.”

 

PERFECT RACE FOR VROON IN IRC ONE

Piet Vroon’s Dutch Ker 46, Tonnerre de Breskens 3, took line honours and the win in IRC One. Piet is extremely agile for a man in his eighties, and nimbly jumped over the transom of Tonnerre to enjoy a beer with the meet and greet volunteer team in the small hours of the morning. “After the North Sea it was warm and fantastic,” commented Piet Vroon. “There are very few months where it is actually nice to sail back home so this is perfect, even at night. Tonnerre could hardly have done better; good company, no damage, other than the cooking gas running out – it was a perfect race.”

SWAN CHALLENGE TROPHY

Nine yachts from Nautor’s Swan competed in this year’s race, another record for the RORC Caribbean 600. The prestigious Swan Challenge Trophy is awarded to the first Swan to finish on corrected time under IRC and was presented to Anders Nordqvist, owner of Swan 90, Nefertiti.

 

CLASSIC WIN FOR MARIELLA

Carlo Falcone’s 79ft Yawl Mariella, designed in 1936 by Alfred Mylne, entered the race for the first time and decided to put up the Mariella Cup for classic yachts that enter the race. The Italian skipper, flying the Antiguan flag, duly won his own trophy which was received by the owner’s daughter, Shirley Falcone.

 

CLASS40 RECORD

For the second year in a row, the Class40 record for the RORC Caribbean 600 was bettered. Gonzalo Botin’s Tales II showed amazing speed around the course, breaking the 2013 course record set by Peter Harding and Hannah Jenner’s 40 Degrees. The Spanish entry was over three hours quicker than the previous record, finishing the 600 mile race in an elapsed time of 2 days, 16 hours 37 minutes 52 seconds.

 

FIRST LINE HONOURS FOR ANTIGUA

Antiguan dentist, Bernie Evan-Wong said he would be back for his 6th RORC Caribbean 600 with a bigger, faster boat and the Grand Soleil 43, Quokka 8 delivered, taking line honours in IRC Two. It is the first time in the six year history of the race that an Antiguan-skippered yacht has taken line honours in any class. However, Peter Sowrey’s First 40, Lancelot II, with Vendee Globe sailor Alex Thomson on board, put in a gutsy performance to win IRC Two after time correction. “It is a long time since I have raced a boat like Lancelot and this race is hard work; definitely more knackering than an Open 60 and the crew were amazing. A great bunch with talent and enthusiasm,” commented Alex Thomson dockside.

 

DORADE SHOWS CLASS WIN

In IRC Three, Yuri Fadeev’s Reflex 38, Intuition was the first yacht to finish. However, after time correction, Matt Brooks’ Classic Dorade was the winner. Hannah Jenner blogged about the experience on board the S&S 52 yawl:

 

“Although this may sound bizarre, it takes a while to get used to the quiet down below. Most of us come from carbon boat backgrounds and are used to the cacophony of noise that reverberates around the hull as you race. Whilst this may not sound pleasant, once you are used to it, the noise lets you know exactly what is happening with the boat. On Dorade there is no chattering over waves, no highly loaded winches screeching as lines are eased and no slamming on trade wind driven seas. Instead there is the creaking sound of the wooden interior as it twists with the motion of the boat and a gentle sound of water rushing by. Sleep therefore is deep.”

 

INSPIRING RACE FOR PACE

TP52, Pace, was third overall and its owner/driver, Johnny Vincent, was taking part in his first RORC Caribbean 600. “Wow, what an awesome race,” commented Johnny. “RORC have invented a truly outstanding event and I firmly believe it will be regarded as one of the ‘must do’ classic races very soon, perhaps it already is. It’s like a giant Cowes Week course; effectively round the cans but on a grand scale in the sunshine, with warming Antiguan hospitality and many smiling faces. All this in the best sailing waters in the world; surely a formula for success.

 

I have taken part in many regattas and events and I have tried to maintain a very simple philosophy; to sail with a great team of people who create that all-important team spirit aboard and to try to win the event we are participating in. The RORC Caribbean 600 has changed something in me. This race is so completely inspiring that I found the thrill of taking part enough. Testament I think to the race’s pedigree. I have no doubt this event will go from strength to strength. From all of us in Team Pace, ‘thank you’ RORC for a memorable experience.”

 

RORC CEO SUMS IT UP

RORC CEO, Eddie Warden Owen, summed up his thoughts for the RORC Caribbean 600. “This race has grown in stature and it is not just the boats but the number of professional sailors that are here. This gives you an idea of how important it is to win this race. However we’ve now got more local boats, more boats crossing the Atlantic from Europe and yachts coming down from America. 60 yachts starting the RORC Caribbean 600 – that’s pretty impressive for a race that’s only six years old.”

The RORC Caribbean 600 started from Antigua on Monday 24th February 2014

  • The 600nm course circumnavigates 11 Caribbean Islands starting from Fort Charlotte, English Harbour, Antigua and heads north as far as St Martin and south to Guadeloupe taking in Barbuda, Nevis, St Kitts, Saba and St Barth’s
  • Results: RORC CARIBBEAN 600 TROPHY – IRC OVERALL
  • 2014 – George Sakellaris, RP72, Shockwave (USA)
  • 2013 – Ron O’Hanley, Privateer, Cookson 50 (USA)
  • 2012 – Niklas Zennström’s JV72, Rán (GBR)
    2011 – George David, Rambler 100, JK 100 (USA)
    2010 – Karl C L Kwok, Beau Geste, Farr 80 (HKG)
    2009 – Adrian Lee, Lee Overlay Partners, Cookson 50 (IRL)
  • Records:
    Multihull record holder – Region Guadeloupe in 40 hours 11 mins 5 secs (2009)
    Monohull record held by Rambler 100 in 40 hours 20 mins 02 secs (2011)
  • Class40 race record: Gonzalo Botin’s Tales II (2014), 2 days, 16 hours 37 minutes 52 seconds
  • Organisers:
    • The Royal Ocean Racing Club also called RORC was established in 1925 and has premises in London and Cowes, Isle of Wight. The RORC organises offshore and inshore yacht races in the UK and all over the world, including the Rolex Fastnet Race, The Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland Race, The Brewin Dolphin Commodores’ Cup, The inaugural RORC Transatlantic Race and The RORC Caribbean 600
    • In co-operation with the French offshore racing club, UNCL, RORC is responsible for IRC, the principal international handicap system for yacht racing worldwide.The Spinlock IRC rating rule is administered jointly by the RORC Rating Office in Lymington, UK and UNCL Centre de Calcul in Paris, France. The RORC Rating Office is the technical hub of the Royal Ocean Racing Club and recognised globally as a centre of excellence for measurement. For Spinlock IRC rating information in the UK please see: www.rorcrating.com

Feature by: Louay Habib

Shockwave at Redonda - Photo by Tim Wright/photoaction.com

Shockwave at Redonda – Photo by RORC/Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

With all 60 yachts accounted for, the Royal Ocean Racing Club announces that the winner of the RORC Caribbean 600 Trophy for the best yacht, overall in IRC on corrected time, is George Sakellaris’ RP72, Shockwave. The trophy was presented to the Shockwave crew at the Prize Giving held at the Antigua Yacht Club.

“I have a great crew and it was an excellent race, lots of wind and the racing was very close,” commented Shockwave’s owner/driver George Sakellaris, shortly after finishing the race. “I have done many offshore races but this is the first time I have raced this one and it was against tough opposition. I think the winds were favourable to us and the Shockwave team used that to our advantage. At the end of the day, winning yacht races is all about the team performance more than anything else.”

Winner of the 2014 RORC Caribbean 600: Shockwave - Photo by RORC/Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

Winner of the 2014 RORC Caribbean 600: Shockwave – Photo by RORC/Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

“That is what ocean racing should be all about,” commented Shockwave tactician, Robbie Doyle. “Beautiful racing between three very tough competitors, all fighting it out the whole way. A heavy-weight battle without a doubt – no question. I have had great moments in sail boats, but that was as much fun as I can remember. For 600 miles we were always in touch with each other, either up a few minutes or down a few minutes, and it all came down to the last beat to finish. It was like an epic tennis match. Every sail change was race critical. Bella Mente is a magic bullet when power reaching; we knew that before the start, so we set about minimising the time lost.”

Robbie Doyle continued, “Bella Mente did a nice job getting through the lee of Guadeloupe by going inshore and at that time she had her time on us. All we tried to do was to stay in touch with her because we knew the race wasn’t over.  The critical point in the race happened just after Barbuda when Bella Mente got under a cloud and literally stopped and we sailed right up to them. After that we knew that if we just stayed in touch, the win would go to Shockwave – that’s yacht racing for you, but what a fantastic experience.”

“With all of the yachts now accounted for, the racing team can join the competitors at tonight’s Prize Giving for a memorable occasion,” commented RORC Racing Manager, Nick Elliott. “There have been some retirements, but we are delighted that there has been only minor damage to yachts. Apart from the expected knocks and bruises for a 600 mile race, everyone is safely ashore and looking forward to a great party.”

The Prize Giving was  Antigua Yacht Club . Winners were  presented with their trophies and medallions. Every competing yacht  received a decanter of English Harbour Rum inscribed with their yacht’s name.

Shockwave crew dockside after the race. Credit: Kevin Johnson/kevinjohnsonphotography.com

Shockwave Crew:Richard Bouzaid (NZL), Jason Carr (GBR), Reginald Cole (USA), Robert Doyle (USA), Jim Gibson (USA), Scott Gregory (CAN), Peter Kingsbury (PRI), Sam Loughborough (USA), Brian McInnis (CAN), Mark McTeigue (AUS), Andy Meiklejohn (NZL), Mark Mendelblatt (USA), Eduardo Natucci (ITA), Liam Newman (SWE), Silas Nolan (AUS), George Sakellaris (USA), Guy Standbridge (GBR), Adrian Stead (GBR), David Swete (NZL), Andrea Visintini (ITA)

A full list of the finishers can be viewed on the RORC Caribbean minisite –http://caribbean600.rorc.org/blog/race-information/results/index.html

Race Report by Louay Habib

 RACE WEBSITE: http://caribbean600.rorc.org

SOCIAL MEDIA: https://www.facebook.com/RoyalOceanRacingClub

Twitter: Follow @offshoreone ‘#rorcrc600’

TRACK THE FLEET:

http://caribbean600.rorc.org/blog/race-information/tracking/index.html

VIRTUAL REGATTA:

Click HERE

SLEEPER. A great first offshore race for Jonty Layfield's brand new Azuree 46, Sleeper, with Sean Malone on board. Second in IRC One, pipped to the post by RORC Yacht of the Year, Tonnerre de Bresken 3 from the Netherlands Credit: Tim Wright/photoaction.com

SLEEPER. A great first offshore race for Jonty Layfield’s brand new Azuree 46, Sleeper, with Sean Malone on board. Second in IRC One, pipped to the post by RORC Yacht of the Year, Tonnerre de Bresken 3 from the Netherlands
Photo by RORC/Tim Wright/Photoaction.com

 

George David's Rambler 90 - Credit: RORC Caribbean 600/Tim Wright/photoaction.com

George David’s Rambler 90 – Photo by RORC Caribbean 600/Tim Wright/photoaction.com

..

At 0700 local time, on Day Two of the RORC Caribbean 600, George David’s RP90, Rambler, had opened up a four mile lead on the water from Hap Fauth’s JV72, Bella MenteRamblers water-line length is a big advantage on the longest reaching leg of the course and the American Maxi is expected to extend that advantage during the day, on the water at least.

Overnight, Bella Mente had stretched six miles ahead of George Sakellaris’ RP72, Shockwave, to lead IRC Zero on corrected time by 15 minutes. Johnny Vincent’s Pace was in a solid third place in class and will be hoping that the lead boats will run out of breeze at some stage of the race so that the British TP52 can press home their rating advantage.

During the first night, squalls were ripping through the race course at regular intervals, bringing cold rain and erratic wind; both in speed and direction, testing the mettle of the 60 strong fleet. One of the smallest yachts in the race, Hot Stuff, crewed by Girls 4 Sail, was approaching St.Kitts. The rest of the fleet, barRambler, Bella Mente and Shockwave, were negotiating the chicane at the top of the course, weaving through the stunning islands that make the RORC Caribbean 600 one of the most beautiful offshore races in the world.

The twin masted schooners, Adela and Athos, have covered over 230 miles in just 20 hours. Athos is just a mile ahead of Adela on the water but, after time correction, Adela leads the Superyacht Class. The two largest yachts in the race are about to enter the narrow confines of the Anguilla Channel and a tacking duel of epic proportions is the likely outcome.

In IRC One, Piet Vroon’s Ker 46, Tonnerre de Breskens 3, has covered over 200 miles of the course in just 20 hours and continues to lead the class, both on the water and on corrected time. Behind Tonnerreare two displacement Swans: Colin Buffin’s Uxorious IV, and Todd Stuart’s White Rhino. Taking into account time correction, the beat through the Anguilla Channel and the reach down to Guadeloupe may favour the two heavyweight competitors, especially as the current wind speed is sub 15 knots which is too little for the light displacement Tonnerre to use her planing ability.

In IRC Two, all 12 yachts have averaged close to eight knots since the start, providing a highly competitive fleet. Peter Sowrey’s First 40, Lancelot II, has been punching above her weight, no doubt aided by the talents of solo round the world sailor, Alex Thomson. On the water, Global Yacht Racing’s First 47.7,EH01, and Bernie Evan Wong’s Grand Soleil 43, Quokka 8, are having an intense battle for line honours in the class, with Lt Col Paul Macro’s Royal Armoured Corps team on Southern Child, just a mile behind the on-the-water leaders.

Adrian Lower's Swan 44, Selene: Photo by RORC Caribbean 600/Tim Wright/photoaction.com

Adrian Lower’s Swan 44, Selene: Photo by RORC Caribbean 600/Tim Wright/photoaction.com

In IRC Three, Classic S&S 52, Dorade, has stretched out a five mile lead on the water and leads the class after time correction. Adrian Lower’s Swan 44, Selene, has taken an absolutely flier. After rounding Saba,Selene tacked and bore away to take up an extreme offshore position, looking to lay St.Barths in one tack: Banging the Corner. Presumably, Selene feel that this tactic will pay off but it is quite a gamble.
Race Report by Louay Habib

Start and 1st leg highlights

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUNEkmVFy8E

 

RACE WEBSITE: Follow the race web site http://caribbean600.rorc.org

SOCIAL MEDIA:

Follow the race on: https://www.facebook.com/RoyalOceanRacingClub

Twitter: Follow @offshoreone ‘#rorcrc600’

TRACK THE FLEET:

Every yacht is fitted with a Yellowbrick Tracker and their progress can be followed on the race website:

http://caribbean600.rorc.org/blog/race-information/tracking/index.html

 

VIRTUAL REGATTA:

Click HERE to play the virtual race

Les Voiles de Saint Barth 2013 (Photo by Tim Wright)

Les Voiles de Saint Barth 2013 (Photo by Tim Wright)

With winter storms continuing to batter the coast of Europe, the Caribbean sailing season is already well underway in the warmth of the trade winds with the first regattas taking place in Antigua, Barbados and Grenada. Many of the regular competitors have been joined by newcomers, who have decided to get a taste for themselves of the atmosphere and the exceptional sailing conditions in the Caribbean. They are all already thinking about the major date on the calendar: Les Voiles de Saint Barth, from 14th to 19th April. We look at the state of play…

LVSB Poster

Les Voiles de Saint Barth marking the pinnacle of the Caribbean season
Joan Navarro from Barcelona is the skipper in charge of the IRC 52 Balearia, a Botin and Carkeek designed boat, which crossed the Atlantic last November from Las Palmas in the Canaries, with ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers). Her first Caribbean outing was a success, as she won the Mount Gay Rum Barbados Race. The RORC classic, the Caribbean 600 and then the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta will allow the beginners on board to learn more from Joan Navarro about how to sail this fast one-design boat. “This will be our first attempt at Les Voiles de Saint-Barth, which is undoubtedly one of the most attractive events in the Caribbean,” declared Navarro. “We know that the competition is likely to be very tough, but that the races will be extremely well-organised with an exceptional atmosphere ashore. We would like to continue on the same lines after our wins in the preparatory races. We often sail with crews made up of people from the business community, who are there to push back their limits, while at the same time enjoying these unique sailing conditions with the breeze and warmth from the trade winds.”Sailing in the Caribbean, a very special pleasure
Also arriving here within the framework of the ARC late last year, Aronax (X 482), skippered by Alain Charlot, and the Dutch crew on the X 602 Nix, skippered by Nico Cortlever a regular at Les Voiles de Saint Barth, having already competed three times, have already registered in the Spinnaker and non Spinnaker classes. They will be doing battle against the Swede, Rikard Roth, who is also busy preparing for the event with his X50 Xar, and who after completing the ARC, has just discovered the amazing delights and pleasures of the Caribbean. “Antigua Sailing Week and LesVoiles de Saint-Barth represent the major goals for the start of the year in the sunshine,” explained Rikard Roth. “We really enjoy sailing in steady winds. It’s truly a very special pleasure to be sailing here. Even if all the manoeuvres seem to be easy, we need to remain focused and not get distracted by the beauty of the backdrop. It is also very enjoyable to be racing in such a warm atmosphere. Our crew is made up of a clever mixture of friends from Sweden and local sailors, who will teach us about all the subtleties of these waters…”

New challenges…
Arco van Nieuland is the happy co-owner with his fellow Dutchman Andries Verder of the Maxi Aragon, a 72-foot Marten-designed boat. Specialising in maxi racing in the Mediterranean, the Dutch are also here for the first time to discover the delights of fashionable yachting around St. Barth. They share with Frank Noël and his lads on the Swiss-registered IRC 52 Near Miss the same appetite for discovering a different atmosphere and new challenges in what is a paradise location, but which will nevertheless require them to find out more about the sea and coastal conditions. “We’re looking for a different sort of contest after competing for three years at all the major events in the Mediterranean,” explained Arco van Nieuland. “Sailing in St. Barth is a real challenge. We hope to be able to reach the standard that is required and improve racing alongside competitors from all over the world in what is for us a totally new environment…”

With two months to go to the big event, 56 boats have already registered, including eight maxis, three IRC 52s, and today’s finest cruising racers, Swans, Grand Soleil and X Yachts…

PRE-REGISTRATIONS FOR 2014

MAXI
1 – ARAGON
Design: MARTEN / 72′ / Owner: Verder Van Nieuwland
2 – CAOL ILA R
Design: MILLS / 68′ / Owner: Alex SCHAERER
3 – BELLA MENTE
Design: Judel/Vrolijk Mini Maxi / 72′ / Owner: Hap FAUTH
4 – RAMBLER
Design: Reichel-Pugh / 90′ / Owner: George DAVID
5 – SELENE
Design: SWAN 80   / Owner: Wendy SCHMIDT
6 – MAXIMISER
Design: FARR / 73′ / Owner: Jose DIEGO-AROZAMENA
7 – OCEAN PHOENIX
Design: Humphreys 77′ / Skipper: Juan Luis Serra LALAURIE
8 – HIGHLAND BREEZE
Design: SWAN 112 / Owner: Ben KOLFF 

IRC 52
9 – SCARLET RUNNER
Design: Reichel Pugh-52 / Owner: Robert DATE
10 – BALEARIA
Design: Botin Carkeek / Owner: Jascha BACH
11 – NEAR MISS
Design: Reichel Pugh 52 / Owner: Frank NOEL

SPINNAKER
12 – TRUE
Design: KERNAN / 47′ / Owner: Leo van den Thillart/Jono SWAIN
13 – HIGH TENSION
Design: MUMM 36 / Owner: Bernie EVAN-WONG
14 – LAZY DOG
Design: MELGES 32 / Owner: Sergio SAGRAMOSO
15 – SPIRIT OF ADVENTURE
Design: VOLVO 60 / Owner: Derek HATFIELD
16 – TEAM BOSTON
Design: FIRST 40 / Owner: Chris JACKSON
17 – AFFINITY
Design: SWAN 48CR / Owner: Jack DESMOND
18 – XAR
Design: X 50 / Owner: Rikard ROTH
19 – J-BOSS
Design: J 111 / 36′ / Owner: Eddy CHALONO
20 – STARK RAVING MAD IV
Design: J 125 / 41′ / Owner: Jim MADDEN
21 – OTRA VEZ
Design: KER 43 / Owner: William COATES
22 – VISIOOPTIK
Design: FIRST 40.7 / Owner: Claude ROTH
23 – ALBACORE 5
Design: GRAND SOLEIL 39 / Owner: J L PEZIN
24 – RED BARON
Design: D Peterson / 43′ / Owner: Pamala Baldwin-Bernie Evans-Wong
25 – St BARTH SAIL RACING
Design: A 40 / Owner: Ronan DELACOU
26 – FISER
Design: B 28 / Owner: Jean Michel FIGUERRES
27 – SMILE and WAVE
Design: Melges 32 / Owner: Jaime TORRES
28 – JOLT 2
Design: BALTIC 45 / Owner: Peter HARRISON
29 – SELENE
Design: Swan 44 / Owner: Adrian LOWER
30 – PUFFY
Design: Swan / 53′ / Owner: Patrick DEMARCHELIER- Skipper: Karl Spijker
31 – RAMANESSIN
Design: Grand Soleil 43 / Skipper: Eamonn ROHAN
32 – VOILES au FEMININ
Design: J 109 / 35′ / Skipper: Sophie OLIVAUD
33 – ARONAX
Design: X 482 / 48′ / Skipper: Alain CHARLOT
34 – MAELIA
Design: X 34 / Skipper: Raphael MAGRAS
35 – CUBA LIBRE
Design: Volvo Ocean 60 / Skipper: Johannes SCHWARZ
36 – SPEEDY NEMO
Design: DUFOUR 34 / Skipper: Raymond MAGRAS
37 – BALLYTRIM
Design: SWAN / 46′ / Owner: Andrew ALLNER Skipper: Geoff Ford
38 – ORMEAU
Design: Beneteau 47 / Skipper: Alain CHARLOT
39 – OPTIQUE BEAUMONT
Design: First 310 S  / Skipper: Jean-Charles BAUMONT
40 – BOOST’N SAIL
Design: MELGES 24 / Skipper: Mowgli FOX
41 – NO-LIMIT
Design: MELGES 24 / Skipper: Lucas DAUNAR
42 – TEAM ISLAND WATER WORLD
Design: MELGES 24 / Skipper: Frits BUS
43 – LEFORT CLIM
Design: MELGES 24 / Skipper: Antoine LEFORT
44 – BUDGET MARINE
Design: MELGES 24 / Skipper: Andrea SCARABELLI

NON SPINNAKER
45 – NIX
Design: X-612 / Skipper: Nico CORTLEVER
46 – ALPHA CENTAURI
Design: SWAN 57 / Skipper: Bruno CHARDON
47 – GROIX
Design: HARMONY 47 / Skipper: Greg PAINE
48 – ST MAARTEN SAILING SCHOOL
Design: FIRST 300 / Skipper: Garth STEYN

RACING MULTIHULL
49 – ZENYATTA
Design: GUNBOAT 62 / Skipper: Nils ERICKSON
50 – TEAM ALL STARS
Design: SeaCart 26 / Skipper: Calle HENNIX
51 – ELVIS
Design: GUNBOAT 63 / Skipper: Jason CARROLL
52 – HALLUCINE
Design: TS 50 / Skipper: Alexis GUILLAUME
53 – PAMPERO
Design: TS 50 / Skipper: BdB Sailing
54 – DAUPHIN TELECOM
Trimaran 50′ / Skipper: Erik CLEMENT
55 – FILDOU
Design: LOMBARD 40 / Skipper: Stephane CATTONI
56 – SANEM
Design: KL28 / Skipper: SANTONI Cedric

Les Voiles de Saint Barth 2013 - race day 4 (Photo by TIm Wright)

Les Voiles de Saint Barth 2013 – race day 4 (Photo by TIm Wright)

Bella Mente Line Honors Winner (Photo by John Payne)The 38th Annual Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race official results are in!  A determined Osita crossed the finish line at 7:15 am. The race started in 10+ knots of SE breeze, then lightened up and got shifty.  Finally, for the second half of the fleet, a cold front rolled through with 30+ knot out of the N seen by several of the competitors.  Thirty two boats started the race, while twenty six sailed to the finish. Bella Mente, Hap Fauth’s Mini Maxi was first across the line for an IRC class win and sailed only 160.9nm on a 160nm course, which earned them the “Best Overall Performance” Award as well. See all the final race results here.

SPOT tracking is officially part of all SORC events. It allows the friends and family to keep track of the race with real time position updates. Click here to watch the tracking replay from the start of this race.

There is one more SORC event this season: the 2013 Pineapple Cup Montego Bay Race starting February 8, 2013.

Want to be a sponsor? Levels of sponsorship are available. Contact sponsorship@sorcsailing.org for more info.

The SORC is a Florida non-profit organization driven by a select group of volunteers that bring professional event management, sailing , racing and other skills to the organization. The SORC mission is to lead the expansion of offshore competitive sailing in South Florida by providing the highest level of race organization, management and promotions for those that enjoy the sport of ocean sailing. Learn more at www.sorcsailing.org.

Place, Yacht Name, Yacht Type, Owner/Skipper, City, State, Country, Results, Total Points

Ft. Lauderdale-Key West – IRC Course

IRC (IRC – 8 Boats)
1. Bella Mente, Judel-Vrolijk Mini Maxi, Hap Fauth , Minneapolis, MN, USA, 1; 1
2. SPOOKIE, Carkeek HP 40, Steve & Heidi Benjamin , Norwalk, CT, USA, 2; 2
3. Decision, HPR Carkeek 40, Stephen Murray , New Orleans, LA, USA, 3; 3
4. Rebecca, J 120, Glenn Gault , League City, TX, USA, 4; 4
5. Thin Ice, Aerodyne 38, Stuart Hebb / John Vincent , Coral Gables, FL, USA, 5; 5
6. Arethusa, Swan 42, Phil Lotz , Newport, RI, USA, 6; 6
7. Rim Shot, Beneteau First 36.7, Russell Dunn , Hollywood, FL, USA, 7; 7
8. Dragon, Class 40, Michael Hennessy , New York, NY, USA, 8; 8

Ft. Lauderdale-Key West – PHRF Course

PHRF A (PHRF – 7 Boats)
1. Different Drummer, Cape Bay Fast 40, Frank Atkinson , West Palm Beach, FL, USA, 1; 1
2. Teamwork, J 122, Robin Team , Lexington, NC, USA, 2; 2
3. Loki, J 105, David Bond , Miami, FL, USA, 3; 3
4. Main Squeeze, Tripp 33, Eamonn deLisser / James Bill , Coral Gables, FL, USA, 4; 4
5. Constellation, Nautor Swan 48-1, Greg Petrat , Sarasota, FL, USA, 5; 5
6. Batucada, Schock 35, Cornelius Sanders , Miami, FL, USA, 6; 6
7. Ace, Cutter 65, Frank Pingitore , Miami , FL, USA, 8/DNF; 8

PHRF B (PHRF – 6 Boats)
1. Mirage, Hobie 33, Christian Schaumloffel , Virginia Beach, VA, USA, 1; 1
2. Bandana, Oyster 48, David Wallace , Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA, 2; 2
3. Commotion, Beneteau 461, Ross Hunton , Coral Springs, FL, USA, 3; 3
4. Walloon, C&C 35 Mark I, Com. Richard D. Grow , Palm Beach , FL, USA, 7/DNF; 7
5. Sempre Amantes, Hunter Pasage 42, Colin Whittaker , Margate, FL, USA, 7/DNF; 7
6. Soap Opera, Hobie 33, Scott Self , Rockwall, TX, USA, 7/DNS; 7

PHRF C (PHRF – 7 Boats)
1. Sunquest, Sloop, Wilfredo Paredes , Miami, FL, USA, 1; 1
2. Susimi, Sweden 370, Michael Carrington , Lighthouse Point, FL, USA, 2; 2
3. Grand Cru, Beneteau 393, Danny Escobar , Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, 3; 3
4. Vendaval, Dufour 34, Oscar Valdes , Miami Lakes, FL, USA, 4; 4
5. Osita, Tartan 40, Becky Lyons , Miami, FL, USA, 5; 5
6. Passion, Catalina 34, Brett Grover , Jesup, GA, USA, 8/DNS; 8
7. Kokomo, Swan 36, Brad Lonstein , Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, 8/DNS; 8

Ft. Lauderdale-Key West – PHRF Multihull Course

Multihull A (PHRF – 7 Boats)
1. Elvis, Gunboat, Jason Carroll , New York, NY, USA, 1; 1
2. Sundog, Seacart 30, Paul Parks , Shady Side, MD, USA, 2; 2
3. Flight Simulator, Corsair 28R, Tom Reese , Youngstown, NY, USA, 3; 3
4. Tri-Vector, Dragonfly 35, David Otto , Miami Beach, FL, USA, 4; 4
5. Double Trouble, Catana 58, Don Balthaser , Ft. Lauderdale, FL, USA, 8/DNF; 8
6. Brake Aweigh, Trimaran, Richard VandeBrake , Lowell, MI, USA, 8/DNF; 8
7. CatNip, Catamaran 35, Victor Mendelsohn , Miami, FL, USA, 8/DNF; 8