J.P.Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

J.P.Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race (Photo by Barry James Wilson)

 

Article by PETA Stuart-Hunt.

The Island Sailing Club, organisers of the J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race, was packed to the rafters with happy Race competitors this morning as they celebrated individual and team successes at the Prizegiving for the 83rd edition of this annual one-day nautical extravaganza.

The Commodore of the ISC, John Dudley, was joined on stage by Sir Ben Ainslie, Richard Chambers, CMO, J.P. Morgan Asset Management, Corrie McQueen, Events & Sponsorship, J.P. Morgan Asset Management, and Chris Thomas, Sailing Secretary, ISC, who galloped through the proceedings in under an hour.
After the Commodore welcomed the VIPs and the assembled gathering, he ran through some of the more interesting Race facts and stats, including that there were 715 finishers and 791 retirees; always regrettable to have more retirees than finishers but a very positive response from the majority of competitors nonetheless.
The slowest elapsed time for a line honours boat ever recorded in the Race’s history was 08.51.37 achieved by Team Richard Mille on their GC32 foiling multihull…and Dudley enjoyed pointing out that Sir Ben had done it on his AC45 in 02.52.15 last year!
Also applauded was the winner of the Tenacity Trophy, awarded annually to the skipper of the last boat home. This year it fell to Stuart Whitmore to win the applause. He crossed the finish line on his Sigma 33, Sixes and Sevens, (IRC3) at 21.51.35, having started his race at 0730 – that’s 14hrs, 21mins 35secs later.
Folkboat Madelaine's skipper Edward Donald (left), crew & the family Donald celebrating winning the Gold Roman Bowl & additional trophies presented by Sir Ben Ainslie at the 2014 J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race. (Photo by Patrick Eden)

Folkboat Madelaine’s skipper Edward Donald (left), crew & the family Donald celebrating winning the Gold Roman Bowl & additional trophies presented by Sir Ben Ainslie at the 2014 J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race. (Photo by Patrick Eden)


The Gold Roman Bowl was awarded to…a Folkboat, Madelaine, skippered by Edward Donald, who hasn’t quite achieved the record four wins of the Gold Roman Bowl by Edward Heath but he’s nearly there, having won it individually three times and the Donald family has collected this famous trophy four times.

The 2014 Raymarine RIR Young Sailor Trophy was awarded to Christopher Barker from Surrey, who was joined on stage by his siblings, Sir Ben Ainslie and Corrie McQueen from J.P. Morgan Asset Management. Photo: Patrick Eden

The 2014 Raymarine RIR Young Sailor Trophy was awarded to Christopher Barker from Surrey, who was joined on stage by his siblings, Sir Ben Ainslie and Corrie McQueen from J.P. Morgan Asset Management. Photo: Patrick Eden

The Island Sailing Club is grateful for the continued support of the Race Title Sponsor, J.P. Morgan Asset Management whose CMO drew the loudest applause when he referred to the ten years of title sponsorship of this amazing Race and importantly announced an extension of this up to and including 2016. The ISC also wishes to thank its Race Partners Dream Yacht Charter, Haven Knox-Johnston, Henri Lloyd, Nautica Watches, Old Pulteney, Raymarine, Red Funnel, Volvo Car UK.

Everyone looks forward to welcoming back the competitors, families and friends, on Saturday, 27th June 2015.

Full results posted here: http://rtir.me/results

The Race weekend highlights on video can be enjoyed here: http://rtir.me/videos

 

All the Race news summaries, the live blog and the image galleries can be enjoyed on the official Race website: 

  • The J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race is the 4th largest participation sporting event in the UK after the London Marathon and the Great North and South Runs, with around 16,000 sailors taking part over the course of one day. The Race is an all-encompassing event that caters for and embraces first timers, families, amateurs and professionals competing at the highest level.  
  • 2010’s Race had 1,754 entries and 1,607 finished the Race. This is the highest ever recorded number of finishers in the history of the Race.
  • Over the event’s nine years of sponsorship by J.P. Morgan Asset Management, more than £600,000 has been raised for charity. 

  • The annual Outstanding Seamanship Award is sponsored by Nautica Watches.  
  • The current monohull race record set by Mike Slade on the 100ft ICAP Leopard on 1st June 2013 stands at 3.43.50. 
     This is 9 minutes and 45 seconds inside ICAP Leopard’s own race record set back in 2008.
  • The multihull race record set on 1st June 2013 by Sir Ben Ainslie on J.P. Morgan BAR, an AC45, stands at 2.52.15 beating by an impressive 16 minutes the previous multihull race record set by Francis Joyon in 2001 aboard Dexia Eure et Loire of 3.08.29.   
  • In 2013, the most coveted prize, the Gold Roman Bowl and J.P. Morgan Salver for First Overall IRC went to 5 West, the TP52 owned and helmed by Sir Keith Mills and Robert Greenhalgh.      

    J.P. Morgan Salver for Second Overall IRC went to Pace and Johnny Vincent.

    The Observer Trophy and J.P. Morgan Trophy for first Monohull to finish went to Mike Slade and ICAP Leopard.

 

PSP Logistics San Francisco to Panama 100 Race start  leg 7 Race 11

PSP Logistics San Francisco to Panama 100 Race start leg 7 Race 11

AFTER A SPECTACULAR SEND-OFF FROM SAN FRANCISCO, USA THE 12 STRONG FLEET COMPETING IN THE CLIPPER 2013-14 RACE PULLED NO PUNCHES AS THE 3,300 MILE RACE TO PANAMA GOT OFF TO A FLYING START. 

With Derry~Londonderry~DoireHenri Lloyd and Old Pulteney first across the start line for Race 11, it wasn’t long before PSP Logistics made its move eager to make an impression and secure a win in its title race. Skipper of PSP Logistics, Chris Hollis which currently lies in second place behind Old Pulteney knows all too well the pressure is on: 
“Today see’s us on our way to Panama in Race 11, which has being named by our sponsor, the PSP Logistics Panama 100 Cup. Needless to say, we want to do very well in the race for obvious reasons. By the time we were under the Golden Gate Bridge and heading out to sea we had over taken four boats.”Although the Northern Irish entry took an early lead, skipper of Derry~Londonderry~Doire Sean McCarter was far from impressed by his teams initial start in Race 11. Sean explains in today’s skipper report:“Our departure today was less than straight forward. With crowds cheering from the dock, we proceeded to bounce our way out of the marina in a very erratic manner. I was worried the Coastguard might want to breathalyse me but I can honestly confirm that as the tide was fully out, the keel was gently ploughing through the muddy bottom and making manoeuvring very tricky!”
“After the embarrassing departure, we knew we had to redeem ourselves at the start. The largely new crew (11 joiners) pulled together really well with the seasoned round the world crew and we managed to win the start and lead out under the Golden Gate Bridge which was fantastic for all aboard (and all our fans who were unlucky enough to witness our departure!)”

Team Garmin at the start of Race 11 in San Photo by Francisco_Abner Kingman Abner Kingman 2014©

Team Garmin at the start of Race 11 in San Photo by Francisco_Abner Kingman Abner Kingman 2014©

With just four miles now separating the top three leading boats, Old PulteneyPSP Logistics and Derry~Londonderry~Doire respectively, all eyes will be on the Race Viewer to see how the tactics in Race 11 will play out over the next few weeks. To read all the skipper reports click here

SKIPPER REPORTS
Sean McCarter
Derry~ Londonderry~ Doire
Simon Talbot
GREAT Britain
Simon Talbot
Henri Lloyd
Rich Gould
Invest Africa
Pete Stirling
Jamaica Get All Right
Matt Mitchell
Mission Performance
Patrick van der Zijden
Old Pulteney
Olly Cotterell
One DLL
Chris Hollis
PSP Logistics
Gareth Glover
Qingdao
Vicky Ellis
Switzerland
20clipper.jpg.article.jpg
Team Garmin
View all Skipper reports
VIEW LATEST RACE STANDINGS

 

 

VIEW THIS BLOG VIEW ALL CREW BLOGS

Henri Lloyd arrives into San Francisco

Henri Lloyd arrives into San Francisco


It’s been one of the toughest legs of the 2013-14 edition of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race, but crossing the finish line, even in the dark, under San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge, is a moment to savour after 5600 miles of ocean racing across the mighty Pacific

GREAT Britain crossed the finish line of Race 10 in the 16 stage global series at 21:42:56 local time (UTC-7) on April 9 to take line honours ahead of rival Henri Lloyd who slipped back into second place around 1.30pm local time today.

Henri Lloyd crossed the line two hours later at 23:45 local time. A battle had ensued for the last five days between Henri Lloyd and GREAT Britain with the teams both alternating between first, second and third place on the leader board.

Invest Africa crossed the line at 05:26am local time on April 10 taking the third line honours place.

All results are provisional and the final positions will be confirmed by the race office after redress is applied. Simon Talbot, skipper of GREAT Britain, said: “We have had a very good race with Eric and Henri Lloyd, its always great to have someone to spar against. It’s no fun if you are 500 miles ahead. It’s a real sense of achievement battling it out. Coming out of the windhole yesterday I just couldn’t see how we would claw it back.

“They managed to pull 15 miles on us by running inshore, then we pulled it back by running deeper and came in first under the bridge. I know Eric will be very pleased with his team’s performance and he has had a very fine race with a crew of 13. We had a crew of 18 and we worked really hard.

“This was not the Pacific crossing that it was billed to be. We had no storms, we had no frontal systems passing over but the wind was gusting at 50 knots at times and we love sailing in that. We had a very fast downwind race and had 20 days of sunshine – that is what you call luck.

“There is a constant battle in a long race like this to keep performance up, but the crew like winning so it is easy for my crew to get out of bed each watch.”

Henri Lloyd skipper Eric Holden said his team had fought with GREAT Britain right to the bitter end for several races in a row now.

“It was their turn this time and they got the better of us. We tried as hard as we could but we just got a little tired towards the end. It was a long race and you can’t push full on the whole time, so you have to pick when you really go for it and when you sit back a bit. You could tell a lot of boats did that and we found the right times.”

GREAT Britain celebrates San Francisco line honours

GREAT Britain celebrates San Francisco line honours

CV24 skipper Vicky Ellis watches Jamaica and Invest Africa just after the start of Race 10.

CV24 skipper Vicky Ellis watches Jamaica and Invest Africa just after the start of Race 10.

And they’re off! The foggy conditions that have caused delay to the Race 10 re-start lifted enough by first light this morning, allowing teams to officially start this highly anticipated 5,600 mile race of mammoth proportion, to San Francisco, USA.


Jamaica Get All Right
 skipper Pete Stirling explained the race start, which took place at 08:50 local time (0050 UTC):  “After nearly two days of slowly making our way south east out of the Yellow Sea, the fog lifted this morning and lead skipper, Eric Holden of Henri Lloyd, organised a Le Mans start.

“There was a ten minute countdown and at one minute all the crews had to be behind the forward coffee grinder and the engine had to be off. On the gun all the crews rushed forward to get up their headsails. The wind conditions were quite light and from behind so the sail plan of choice was full mainsail, staysail and Yankee 1. Le Mans start rules dictate all boats must keep the same course and sail plan for the first ten minutes, after which they can do what they want.”

After a clean start, the fleet is currently passing beneath South Korea, just under 300 miles from the waypoint beneath Sata Misaki lighthouse on the southern tip of mainland Japan. Qingdao and Derry~Londonderry~Doire, currently lead the pack at time of press but as it is all very tightly packed, the leaderboard is likely to update regularly.

As the fleet turns north along the Japanese coastline, the Kuroshio Current or ‘Black Current’ (a strong north flowing current that appears a deeper blue than the sea through which it flows) will bring stronger, northerly winds, expected to both propel and challenge the teams as they approach the North Pacific Ocean. 

Race 10 includes an Ocean Sprint and Scoring Gate, allowing teams the chance to pick up bonus points along the course. All teams will also be entitled to two periods of Stealth Mode – once activated, that particular yachts position will be hidden from the Race Viewer for 24 hours for attempted tactical gain. 

PSP Logistics departed Qingdao this morning and are now motoring to the same re-start line. Their overall race performance will be based on elapsed time and not first over the line. Skipper Chris Hollis explained his teams thoughts:  “It’s very similar to when we left Albany (Race 5), when we started 36 hours behind the fleet, yet closed in to finish fourth fastest.

“The psychology makes it a little harder to race because you don’t have a boat next to you, but we will set our own gates to achieve time targets and race weather windows. We’re all looking forward to this trip. This is the big one, and we’re ready for it,” added Chris.

 To read all the skipper reports click here or choose individually below. 

 To track the fleet’s progress on the official Race Viewer click here

SKIPPER REPORTS
Sean McCarter
Derry~ Londonderry~ Doire
Simon Talbot
GREAT Britain
Simon Talbot
Henri Lloyd
Rich Gould
Invest Africa
Pete Stirling
Jamaica Get All Right
Matt Mitchell
Mission Performance
Patrick van der Zijden
Old Pulteney
Olly Cotterell
One DLL
Chris Hollis
PSP Logistics
Gareth Glover
Qingdao
Vicky Ellis
Switzerland
20clipper.jpg.article.jpg
Team Garmin
PSP Logistics leaves China for start of Leg 6  photo courtesy Clipper Round the World Race

PSP Logistics leaves China for start of Leg 6 photo courtesy Clipper Round the World Race/ © Olli Geibel

Leg 6/Race 10 of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race has restarted after fog required the fleet, which left China on Sunday, to motor-sail until conditions improved this morning.

The fog lifted enough by first light this morning allowing teams to officially start the 5,600 mile race from Qingdao to San Francisco, USA.

Henri Lloyd skipper Eric Holden organised a Le Mans start which took place at 08:50 local time Tuesday (0050 UTC).

After a clean start, the fleet is currently passing beneath South Korea, just under 300 miles from the waypoint beneath Sata Misaki lighthouse on the southern tip of mainland Japan.

Derry~Londonderry~Doire, and Old Pulteney currently lead the pack, just one mile ahead of Invest Africa andJamaica Get All Right.

As the fleet turns north along the Japanese coastline, the Kuroshio Current or ‘Black Current’ (a strong north flowing current that appears a deeper blue than the sea through which it flows) will bring stronger, northerly winds, expected to both propel and challenge the teams as they approach the formidable North Pacific Ocean.

Leg 6 includes an Ocean Sprint and Scoring Gate, allowing teams the chance to pick up bonus points along the course. All teams will also be entitled to two periods of Stealth Mode – once activated, that particular yachts position will be hidden from the Race Viewer for 24 hours for attempted tactical gain.

PSP Logistics set off for the revised start line for Leg 6, Race 10 this morning after a late start following several setbacks in Race 9.
To read more, click here.

QINGDAO, China. 09-MAR-2014; Clipper Ventures Round The World race stopover in Qingdao China © Olli Geibel

QINGDAO, China. 09-MAR-2014; Clipper Ventures Round The World race stopover in Qingdao China © Olli Geibel

Life on deck at 45 degrees

Life on deck at 45 degrees

THE WIND HAS STRENGTHENED OVERNIGHT AND THE TEAMS ARE BACK TO BEATING INTO 35 TO 40 KNOTS OF WIND, WITH FOUR YACHTS CLEAR OF THE NOTORIOUS TAIWAN STRAIT.

Sail plans have become conservative with storm sails hoisted and three reefs in the main with conditions rough because of the short, choppy seas the Strait is known for.

 Eric Holden, skipper of Henri Lloyd, said the conditions are expected to last throughout the day with possibly a slight reprieve tomorrow with a few knots less predicted.

“That would be very welcomed but really we should prepare for this to continue for the next three or so days until we are well out of the Strait of Taiwan, where the wind accelerates as it funnels between Taiwan and the mainland.”

 The boats are on an individual time trial, with the race to Qingdao being decided on elapsed times.

However, GREAT Britain and Derry~Londonderry~Doire set off at the exact same time so are able to match race each other.

 Sean McCarter, skipper of Derry~Londonderry~Doire, said: “For the second time in our match race, we have split tacks with GREAT Britainelecting to continue on north out of the Strait while we headed east in search of more favourable current and a better wind angle to head north. It was pretty painful getting out here so let’s hope it pays in the next couple of schedules!”

 The north east monsoon is expected to ease again over the next two days, but the weather is very localised around the Strait due to the Taiwanese land mass.

 PSP Logistics left the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club in Causeway Bay at mid-day local time today (UTC + 8 hours); her departure was delayed slightly longer to also replace a faulty fuel pump.

 Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, founder and chairman of the Clipper Race, thanked the Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club for all the help they gave the fleet during the brief pit stop to repair the yacht’s forestays.

 “It was not just the way they leaped into the breach, it was the enthusiastic and professional way they sorted out our problem. The hospitality of the club is legendary, and many of the crews had the opportunity to avail themselves of the bar and meals whilst in port. The RHKYC is a very special yacht club.”

 

To read all the skipper reports click here

 

To track the fleet’s progress on the official Race Viewer click here

Sean McCarter
Derry~ Londonderry~ Doire

 

Simon Talbot
GREAT Britain

 

Simon Talbot
Henri Lloyd

 

CV31, Leg 4, Race 5, Day 5 - Jenn Hill

Jamaica Get All Right Jenn Hill Leg 4 , Race 5, Day 5 (Photo courtesy of Jamaica Get All Right / Clipper Round the World Race)

17.01.2014 / Race 8: Day 5
BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA TO SINGAPORE: OLD PULTENEY NAVIGATOR CUP
It’s been all change at the thop of the leaderboard in the last 24 hours with frustrating squally conditions hampering the fleets progress, while a tactical ploy by “Jamaica Get It All” saw the team storm ahead of “Derry – Londonderry – Doire”, relinquishing it’s lead for the first tine in race 8.
After a tactical decision to sail as close to the wind as possible in the last 24 hours Jamaica Get All Right made a triumphant sprint into first place. However in the last hour the Northern Irish entry Derry~Londonderry~Doire has challenged and regained its lead. As the fleet bunch up GREAT Britain has slid into third place just one mile ahead of the Dutch entry OneDLL as just 30 miles separate the top eight teams.

Skipper of Jamaica Get All Right, Pete Stirling described his tactical decision and impressive new position within the fleet.
“Overnight we deliberately sailed as close to the wind as we possibly could and it paid off as this morning we were the most westerly boat in the fleet, which had the effect of moving us up the leader board in a dramatic fashion. So now we find ourselves in a good position but the really hard part will be defending it as the rest of the fleet will be hot on our heels.”
As the fleet make its way through the Soloman Sea which separates Papa New Guinea and the Soloman Islands, the squally unsettled conditions, ever changing wind direction and endless sail changes continue to blight the fleets progress. However, PSP Logisticshave enjoyed the light relief from the hot and humid conditions having experienced ‘our first official shower since Brisbane.’
Skipper of Switzerland, Vicky Ellis sums up the conditions of the last 24 hours:

“Combine the rose dawn with the rising clouds and come the afternoon we have been in squall after squall.They are now so dense it’s just one huge squall according to the radar.

“Stuck under this same cloud are OneDLL and Old Pulteney. Just arrived too on the Automatic Identification System (AIS) is PSP Logistics whose luck seems to have run the same as ours after they had fortunate wind to run them in to the Solomon Seas and have caught up with the pack.”

 

To read all the skipper reports click here

To track the fleets progress on the official Race Viewer click here

 

 

Photo courtesy of Henri Lloyd / Clipper Round the World Race 2013-14

Photo courtesy of Henri Lloyd / Clipper Round the World Race 2013-14

LINE HONOURS WINNER WILD OATS XI  Crew on the rail (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

LINE HONOURS WINNER WILD OATS XI Crew on the rail (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

ONE MORE TIME
While not the record-setting pace, Wild Oats XI still made her indelible mark in the record books, taking the line honours win at the 2013 Rolex Sydney Hobart Race. Close reaching up the Derwent River, the 100-footer crossed the finish line off Battery Point in Hobart, at 7:07pm local time (AEDT). Wild Oats’ elapsed time of 2 days, 6 hours, 7 minutes, 27 seconds gave sWild Oats XIkipper Mark Richards and crew their seventh line honours win, which ties the record held by the yacht Morna/Kurrewa IV.

Thousands of spectators lined the shore and docks of Constitution Dock and neighboring piers on a beautiful summer’s evening to cheer Wild Oats XI as their crew tied up to the dock. Stepping ashore, a tired looking Mark Richards said, “It was all hard…a lot of testing conditions, a lot of light air and mentally very draining. We had a bit of everything that was the great thing about it.

BOB OATLEY, OWNER OF WILD OATS XI AND SKIPPER MARK RICHARDS RECEIVE THE ROLEX YACHTMASTER TIMEPIECE

BOB OATLEY, OWNER OF WILD OATS XI AND SKIPPER MARK RICHARDS RECEIVE THE ROLEX YACHTMASTER TIMEPIECE Photo By: Rolex / Carlo Borlengh

Greatest thrill of my
life…seven!
Bob Oatley – Wild Oats XI owner

“This is one of the best wins you could probably have. There’s a lot of new competition and a lot of anxiety, no one hadany idea how we were going to go against each other. To sail away from these guys throughout the race was pretty amazing.” Wild Oats XI owner, Australian winemaker Bob Oatley, joined Richards ashore and exclaimed, “Greatest thrill of my life…seven!”

Following was a dockside presentation where skipper Mark Richards and owner Bob Oatley were presented with the JJ Illingworth Trophy and a Rolex timepiece as the first yacht to finish.

WILD OATS XI, Sail No: 10001, Bow No: XI, Owner: Robert Oatley, Skipper: Mark Richards, Design: Reichel Pugh 30 Mtr, LOA (m): 30.5, State: NSW off Tasman Island

WILD OATS XI, Sail No: 10001, Bow No: XI, Owner: Robert Oatley, Skipper: Mark Richards, Design: Reichel Pugh 30 Mtr, LOA (m): 30.5, State: NSW off Tasman Island

The Reichel/Pugh-designed boat, built in 2005, showed itself as still competitive in this year’s race, up against the toughest fleet ever assembled – which included 100-footers Perpetual Loyal and Ragamuffin 100, Volvo 70s Giacomo and Black Jack, and the newly launched 80-footer, Beau Geste. Richards said “To see a nearly nine-year old boat like this perform against the greatest and latest ocean racing boats in the world is pretty impressive.”

Ian Burns, Wild Oats’ strategist recalled a key part of the race, “The first night proved to be a huge parking lot for us and a lot of boats cleverly maneuvered through that, and really gave us quite a hard time to catch up. Luckily we had quite light conditions, which I don’t think suits them (Perpetual Loyal) anywhere near as well as us. We were able to chip away slowly, you know a 1/10th of a mile at a time.  Just after we got past them we came into a really light zone of wind and we managed to keep going – and they got parked up in the same zone and lost a huge amount of distance there.

“It started off (first day) if you were in front, you sort of lost to the guys behind you; but the second half of the race, once you got in front you got richer and richer, the wind got stronger, and more shift to you. We were able to leverage that pretty heavily and make some steady gains right through the whole race right down to Tasman.”

Perpetual LOYAL (Photo by Rolex /  Daniel Forster)

Perpetual LOYAL (Photo by Rolex / Daniel Forster)

Anthony Bell’s Perpetual Loyal was second across the finish line with a time of 2 days, 9 hours, 19 minutes, 56 seconds. Bell is familiar with the front of the fleet – the skipper took line honours in the 2011 Rolex Sydney Hobart Race on his previous boat Investec Loyal. That boat, now in the hands of Syd Fischer as Ragamuffin 100, was on track to be third over the finish line, givingWild Oats and Loyal a run for their money.

Ragamuffin 100  ( Photo by Rolex / Daniel Forster)

Ragamuffin 100 ( Photo by Rolex / Daniel Forster)

When the bulk of the race fleet reached Bass Strait earlier today, the notorious body of water proved somewhat benign, with a 20 – 25 knot northeasterly providing perfect downwind sailing conditions. But the threat of the approaching low pressure that is forecast to bring a 30 – 40 knot southwesterly has the boats pushing to get as far south, as fast as possible.

Overnight tonight, a closely grouped pack of bigger boats are due to finish including Black Jack, Beau Geste, Giacomo, and Wild Thing.

The race for overall handicap winner is still up for play. With the changing weather conditions, competitor’s chances have been reshuffled. At 10pm local time AEDT, Bruce Taylor’s Caprice 40, Chutzpah was leading IRC overall on handicap.

Ninety boats are still racing – today Wilparina retired for unknown reasons, while Canute retired with rudder bearing problems.