MACIF arrives in New York City, July 3, 2017 (Photo © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.)

François Gabart and the crew on MACIF win THE BRIDGE 2017 Ultime Trimarans – Centennial Transat race as they crossed under the The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on July 3rd at 13:31 EST. The crew consisting of François Gabart – skipper, Pascal Bidégorry, Guillaume Combescure, Antoine Gautier, Benoît Marie and Yann Riou. They crossed in 8 days, 31 minutes and 20 seconds. The boat crossed the atlantic averaging 18.6 kts.

MACIF Crew at press conference (Photo © George Bekris)

The race pitted the Queen Mary 2 against four Ultime trimarans skippered by some of the greatest names in Ocean Racing. François Gabart – MACIF, Francis Joyon – IDEC SPORT, Thomas Coville – Sodebo Ultime and Yves Le Blévec – ACTUAL.

François Gabart © George Bekris

They left Saint-Nazaire on June 25th UTC for the 3068.4 nm transat. The trimaran skippers faced headwinds during much of their race as a result they raced a longer race in terms of actual miles than the Queen Mary 2. They also had some areas of very calm winds reducing their boat speed.

  • © George Bekris

The QM2 could follow a more or less straight line to the finish minus the exclusion zones for ice formations and Cetaceans. The Queen Mary 2 did stray into the ice exclusion zone for a short time before correcting causing them a penalty.

  • © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.

IDEC SPORT, skippered by Francis Joyon placed 2nd when they crossed under the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge at 8 days 11 hours 9 minutes 3seconds. The crew covered this transat with an average of 17.2 kts of speed. We spoke to Francis Joyon following his arrival in New York and he said he plans to head back across the atlantic solo on Friday July 7th on IDEC SPORT. He stated this will be the first time he has a chance to sail IDEC SPORT solo and he wants to take this opportunity to get to know his boat without crew. 17.2 kts average speed.

  • © George Bekris

Sodebo Ultime crossed 3rd despite having an injured crewman on Tuesday, July 4 at 05:18:55 EST. Just 50 miles behind IDEC SPORT. They completed the race in 8 days,16 hours,18 minutes, 55 seconds with a 17.04 kts average speed.

Thomas Coville, the current round the world solo record holder, was in good spirits after arrival and was happy with the time they made coming in as they passed the Statue of Liberty right after dawn. They were able to complete the race without evacuating the injured Thierry Briend until they passed the finish. He was then transferred to a RIB and taken for medical attention as a precaution.

© Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co. NEW YORK CITY – USA , 4 Juillet 2017

Coville commented on dealing with his injured friend and crewmate after arriving at the Atlantic Boat Basin ““We were all very worried when Thierry had his problem,” Colville said. “I’m not going to discuss the whole race through this, but it really did affect us. He was knocked flat on his back and then the other way, face first onto a winch. He was incoherent for a few hours and couldn’t remember what had happened. The doctor said evacuating him from the boat wasn’t the right thing to do because it was best to keep him out of the elements. You need to have a very professional crew running the boat, so that when you have an injury, like Thierry had, you can manage it properly. We managed to race the boat to the finish and the situation with Thierry at the same time.”

  • © George Bekris

ACTUAL finish off the race and concluded the race when they arrived in New York on July 5th, at 10.28 pm and 58 seconds. They arrived in the night with spotlights highlighting the crew and boat against the Statue of Liberty as they passed.

  • © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.

The event concluded for the Ultime Trimarans with the award ceremony at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan on July 6, 2017.

  • © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.

Although the rest of the MACIF was on hand for the ceremony and to accept the award. François Gabart had to appear via live video because he had to return to France where his wife is expecting a baby at any time.

New York Yacht Club awards presentation. (Photo © Thierry Martinez / Sea&Co.)

The event concluded for the Ultime Trimarans with the award ceremony at the New York Yacht Club in Manhattan on July 6, 2017.

THE BRIDGE 2017 (Photo © George Bekris)

Crew of IDEC SPORT
Francis Joyon
Alex Pella (ESP)
Sébastien Audigane
Gwénola Gahinet
Clément Surtel
Quentin Ponroy

Crew of ACUTAL
Yves Le Blévec
Samantha Davies
Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant
Davy Beaudart
Stanislas Thuret

Crew of Sodebo Ultime
Thomas Coville
Jean-Luc Nélias
Vincent Riou
Billy Besson
Loïc Le Mignon
Thierry Briend

Crew of MACIF
François Gabart
Pascal Bidégorry
Guillaume Combescure
Antoine Gautier
Benoît Marie
Yann Riou

Damien Grimont, Organiser of THE BRIDGE, is raised overhead by the MACIF Crew after they docked at The Atlantic Basin (Photo © George Bekris)

 

Visit George Bekris Photography for more photos of THE BRIDGE 2017 Maxi Trimarans and Crews 

Visit THE BRIDGE 2017 for more Information and Statistics about the Maxi Trimarans Race

World Sailing Speed Record Breaker Lending Club 2, driven by Renaud Laplanche and Ryan Breymaier, preparing for the Newport to Bermuda passage. (Photo Credit Quin Bisset)

World Sailing Speed Record Breaker Lending Club 2, driven by Renaud Laplanche and Ryan Breymaier, preparing for the Newport to Bermuda passage. (Photo Credit Quin Bisset)

 

Laplanche and Breymaier establish new World Sailing Speed Record
23 hours, 9 minutes, 52 seconds

Bermuda (20 April 2015) – Renaud Laplanche, CEO of Lending Club (NYSE: LC), the world’s largest marketplace connecting borrowers and investors, co-skipper Ryan Breymaier, and the crew of the 105’ trimaran Lending Club 2 have today established a new world sailing speed record for the 635-nautical mile course from Castle Hill Lighthouse, in Newport, Rhode Island, to Kitchen Shoal Beacon in Bermuda. The new record, subject to ratification by the World Sailing Speed Record Council (WSSRC), is 23 hours, 9 minutes, 52 seconds at an average speed of 27 knots.

It was only four days ago that the WSSRC ratified Lending Club 2’s record-setting passage of early April from Cowes to Dinard (across the English Channel) to confirm their place in the sailing record books; Guinness World Records has also confirmed that they will include the record. That 138-nautical mile passage, at an average speed of 26.36 knots, was completed in 5 hours and 15 minutes – 8 minutes faster than the previous record which had stood since 2002.

The Lending Club Sailing team had been on standby at Newport Shipyard for a week while the crew prepared the boat and waited for suitable conditions – a moderate reaching breeze and manageable sea conditions which allow Lending Club 2 to reach speeds over 40 knots.  They crossed the starting line at Castle Hill Lighthouse at 05 34 40 UTC (1:34:40 EDT), making roughly 5.5 knots.  Three and a half hours into the passage, they had reached speeds of 30 knots, and by the 12 hour mark were half-way to their destination.  At 04 44 32 UTC (1:44:32 EDT), the new record was set,  an electrifying 15 hours faster than the old record, by virtue of Lending Club 2 averaging 27 knots over the 635 nautical miles.

“We set our sights on three speed sailing records for the 2015 season: Cowes-Dinard, Newport to Bermuda, and the 2,215-nautical mile Transpac,” said Laplanche, who had surpassed 40 knots during the passage. “Newport to Bermuda was a challenging 23 hours, 9 minutes and 52 seconds. We have had an exciting ride down here, and with two new world records now under our belts, we’re more primed than ever for the Transpac.”

Until today, the record for the Newport to Bermuda passage had belonged to the late adventurer Steve Fossett for 15 years. Fossett’s record time of 38 hours, 35 minutes and 53 seconds was achieved on the 125’ catamaran Playstation in 2000 at an average speed of 16 knots.

“Steve Fossett was a great sailor who I had the honor to sail with on Playstation,” said Breymaier, a member of the Royal Ocean Racing Club. “We are very happy to honor his memory with such a fast time! He would have been content to see his mark bettered with such a great time. We’re thrilled with the record we set today – it’s fantastic to have the wind at our back as we head to the Transpac.”

Laplanche, who makes his home in San Francisco, personally chartered the 105’ trimaran (originally launched as Groupama 3 in 2006) for the three record-breaking attempts in 2015. With success in the first two attempts, focus will now shift to mid-July’s Transpac, the longest ocean race in the world.  At stake is not only the Transpac course record but also the outright sailing speed record across the Pacific to Hawaii.

Lending Club 2 will return to the City by the Sea following the Newport-Bermuda passage and remain at Newport Shipyard until the end of April. The yacht will then head to New York for a week before sailing through the Panama Canal to arrive in San Francisco in June.

The Lending Club Sailing team is an international crew with a mix of American, French and German sailors. Training and racing together since the start of the program, the same team will race all three record attempts: Co-skippers Renaud Laplanche (FRA/USA) and Ryan Breymaier (USA), who is also the Project Manager; Captain Jan Majer (USA); Navigator Boris Herrmann (GER); Roland Jourdain (FRA); Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant (FRA); Stanislas Delbarre (FRA) and Quin Bisset (NZL) who handles onboard media.

 

Lending Club 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

Lending Club 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

Lending Club 2 is slated to cross the start line at Castle Hill Light in the early hours of Sunday morning, 19 April, beginning the passage which is anticipated to earn the team its second world speed sailing record in as many tries.  The Newport to Bermuda course record is currently held by Steve Fossett, who, aboard his 125-foot catamaran Playstation, set a time of 38 hours, 35 minutes and 53 seconds – at an average speed of 16 knots – in 2000.

With ideal conditions predicted, Lending Club 2 – which is capable of speeds over 40 knots – looks likely to complete the 635-nautical mile course in 28 hours or less.  Details on how to follow the team follow below.

  • Live tracking updates every 15 minutes : https://my.yb.tl/lendingclub2/
    •          The Facebook page will include the tracker link and news as it comes in from the boat: www.facebook.com/lendingclubsailing/
    •          This dropbox folder will be updated with new photos as soon as they arrive from the boat : https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ekprgrtkputjuzf/AAAGfMpV8RYNLUyHWCMOXn3ga?dl=0
    •          On Thursday, the Cowes to Dinard record, which the team set just two weeks ago (138-nautical miles in 5 hours and 15 minutes at an average speed of 26.36 knots) was ratified by the World Sailing Speed Racing Council and will be included, as well, in the Guinness World Records.

    Lending Club 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

    Lending Club 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

The Lending Club Sailing team: Co-skippers Renaud Laplanche (FRA/USA) and Ryan Breymaier (USA), who is also the Project Manager; Captain Jan Majer (USA); Navigator Boris Herrman (GER); Roland Jourdain (FRA); Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant (FRA); Stanislas Delbarre (FRA) and Quin Bisset (NZL) who handles onboard media.

About Lending Club 2
The trimaran, designed by VPLP and built in France in 2006, was originally named Groupama 3. Franck Cammas and his crew on Groupama 3 won the Jules Verne Trophy for the fastest circumnavigation of the globe (48 days, 7 hours, 44 minutes, 52 seconds) in the spring of 2010.  The yacht was then modified for solo sailing (principally with a shorter mast) and has been sailed to victory in the last two editions of the Route du Rhum, from northern France to Guadeloupe.

For the record-breaking passages that San Francisco-based Laplanche and co-skipper Ryan Breymaier are undertaking during the 2015 season, the trimaran was chartered and then refitted with its taller rig, bringing the yacht back to full power mode, ideal for crewed record-breaking attempts.

Lending Club Sailing technical partners: Switlik Survival Equipment www.switlik.com; Marlow Ropes www.marlowropes.com; Guy Cotten foul weather gear www.guycotten.com; Events Clothing www.eventsclothing.co.nz; Underwater Kinetics technical equipment www.uwkinetics.com

Lending Club 2 at Newport Shipyard awaiting Newport to Bermuda record attempt  (Photo by George Bekris)

Lending Club 2 at Newport Shipyard awaiting Newport to Bermuda record attempt (Photo by George Bekris)

RMaxi Trimaran Spindrift 2 on Standby at Newport Shipyard, Newport, RI (Photo by George Bekris)

Maxi Trimaran Spindrift 2 on Standby at Newport Shipyard, Newport, RI (Photo by George Bekris)

 

After a month on standby in Newport (Rhode Island), there has still been no launch window. Spindrift racing remains on the starting blocks, all set to attack the New York to Lizard Point record of 3d 15h 25m. The weather conditions, however, are delaying the start, forcing the team to be patient, despite their desire to set sail. As Yann Guichard explains, these accomplished sailors have but no choice but to accept the wait, unusual as it may be for an elite sportsman. Imagine a football team entering the locker rooms before a crucial World Cup match…without knowing when they will play. All they can do is wait nervously in anticipation. The experienced crew of the maxi-trimaran Spindrift 2 know only too well that they must sit and wait, but the wait to attempt such a prestigious record as the North Atlantic crossing is a challenge of its own.

RMaxi Trimaran Spindrift 2 on Standby at Newport Shipyard, Newport, RI (Photo by George Bekris)

Maxi Trimaran Spindrift 2 on Standby at Newport Shipyard, Newport, RI (Photo by George Bekris)

“Despite enduring the standby at home, as opposed to on the quayside, we are fully alert and mentally ready to drop everything and jump on a plane as soon as possible,” explains Yann, who sends a message to his teammates every day to keep them informed about the latest conditions. “Dona and I are obviously following the weather very closely. Together, with team navigator Erwan Israël, we check the two daily American and European forecast updates. The first come in before 5am and, whilst there is still not really a departure window on the horizon, we inevitably check each weather update religiously. We are as ready as we can be with a good technical and sporting potential, but the weather is out of our hands. That is what makes record attempts so frustrating…but also so special. When you are on standby, it can at times be stressful, as any athlete waiting for a big match can understand. In addition, we know that when the day of reckoning comes, once we get out on the ocean, conditions will be extreme.”

ice service

ice service

Three factors blocking the route.

In June, drift ice in the Labrador Current created the first natural barrier – a harsh winter has meant that icebergs are lasting longer than normal. They are melting, slowly but surely, but the large ice sheets are only disappearing gradually from satellite photos.

The other obstacle at the moment is the Azores High, an anticyclone centred over the Azores and spread like an insurmountable mountain across the entire North Atlantic. “To make the crossing in record-breaking conditions you have to leave ahead of a depression on the American coast and ride it up to Newfoundland, where you pick up another and accelerate for the rest of the crossing. You then have to stay in front of the system, which must not catch you up or wane before you reach the finish line,” adds Erwan Israël. “With such a huge (3,000 km wide), powerful (1,036 hPa) anticyclone at the moment, the depressions are not making any headway, and neither can we!”

And then there is Arthur, a highly active cyclone that formed over Miami before moving up the east coast of America. On 4 July, a national holiday, 100 mph (160 km/h) winds hit North Carolina. “Fortunately, the cyclone shifted course, with its centre moving to 150 nautical miles (300 km) from Newport, where Spindrift 2 is currently on standby. However, it is affecting the order of the weather systems in the New York area, where the anticyclone is pushing the depressions north and blocking our path,” adds Yann. “But it is early July and the standby can run through to mid-August if necessary, so we still have plenty of margin to look out for a good departure window!”

Virtual Regatta – your turn to play !

Virtual Regatta Spindrift

So whilst you wait to follow the real record attempt, why not mount your own challenge – the popular virtual regatta game is sporting the colours of Spindrift racing for the occasion! Starting today and continuing throughout the summer, you can attempt to beat the 12-day record set by the pioneering Charlie Barr and his 50-man crew back in 1905. Furthermore, you can try as many times as you like! Since 1905 some of the world’s greatest skippers have held this legendary record: Marc Pajot, Patrick Morvan, Philippe Poupon, Serge Madec, Steve Fossett, Bruno Peyron, Franck Cammas and the current record-holder Pascal Bidégorry, who set a time of 3 days, 15 hours. So, do you have what it takes to join this elite group? Select your boat and your weather window, and watch out for the best window to attempt this record before 1 September 2014…or set sail at the same time as Spindrift 2 !

In the mean time, keep following us on www.spindrift-racing.com/atlantic/ and www.virtualeregatta.com as well as on our social media (Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and YouTube).
IN NUMBERS: the crewed record attempts by Spindrift racing – 2014 season.
Crewed record to beat: 3 days, 15 hours and 25 minutes; 32.94 knots.
Zenith by Spindrift racing 24-hour record: 908 miles; 37.84 knots.
Holder since August 2009: maxi-trimaran Banque Populaire V (now Spindrift 2); held by Pascal Bidégorry and his crew.
Route: 2,880 miles (5,333 km) between Ambrose Light in New York and Lizard Point, on the southwest tip of Cornwall, England.
Spindrift 2 : the largest racing trimaran in the world (40 metres), architects VPLP.
Skippers: Yann Guichard (FRA) and Dona Bertarelli (SUI).
Crew : 14 people on board for this record, plus routing onshore (final crew to be confirmed).
Standby dates: June 3 to mid-august, 2014.

 

 

Spindrift 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

Spindrift 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

 

Newport shipyard June 4, 2014 and the Maxi Trimaran Spindrift 2 sits patiently at the dock being readied and tended by her crew in preparation to break a very high bar. The records to to beat are the crewed North Atlantic record and ‘Zenith 24-hour records.  Dona Bertarelli and Yann Guichard accompanied by their crew make last minute adjustments and meet with sponsors and media.   The co skippers are in Newport awaiting a weather window for that just right system to propel them across the Atlantic.  The window does not look too promising for the next 10 days, but only time will tell.

 

Dona Bertarelli (Photo by George Bekris)

Dona Bertarelli (Photo by George Bekris)

There will b 2 record attempts:

The Transatlantic W to E, Ambrose Light – Lizard Point Record stands 3 Days 15 hours 25 minutes and 48 seconds. That record is held by Pascal Bidegorry and crew on board Banque Populaire V and was set in August of 2009.  Banque Populaire V averaged 32.94 kts to set the record.

and

The 24-hour record – World record for distance sailed in 24hrs  Was set by Pascal Bidegorry and crew on board Banque Populaire V 908 miles at an average of 37.84 knots.

Yann Guichard (Photo by George Bekris)

Yann Guichard (Photo by George Bekris)

 

Team Spindrift is a team of  30 that tend the  needs of the Spindrift Stable. She is at a distance and up close a visually stunning boat. The closer you get the better she looks. With her black, gold and white paint scheme even sitting still she looks fast.  Her size up close is quite massive.

Spindrift_2_George_Bekris_2014_09

Spindrift 2 , Newport June 4, 2014  (photo by George Bekris)

Spindrift 2 , Newport June 4, 2014 (photo by George Bekris)

Specifications of Spindrift 2 

Name: Maxi Spindrift 2

Length overall: 40 m
Beam overall: 23 m
Hull draft: 5,10 m
Air draft: 41 m
Mainsail: 365 m2
Gennaker: 440 m2
Reacher: 292 m2
Staysail: 166 m2
ORC: 72 m2

Spindrift_2_George_Bekris_2014_11

 

Spindrift 2’s  mast has been cut down by 6 meters. By reducing the mast’s  height on the boat it won’t have to spend as much time reefed.   Each time the sail is reefed down a little more of the optimum shape in the original design is lost. Thus costing the boat speed.  The designers hope that by keeping the sail all the way up to the masthead they will gain much needed speed and lessen the power lost with reefs thus making more efficient time.   The mast reduction lessen the weight of the boat as well.

 

Spindrift 2 , Newport June 4, 2014  (photo by George Bekris)

Spindrift 2 , Newport June 4, 2014 (photo by George Bekris)

 

Every inch of the boat has been scrutinized to find any advantage because the stakes are so high. This will be a difficult record to break, and the possibility of breaking a record that in itself was a feat of great accomplishment weighs on the crew.

 

Yann Guichard and Dona Bertarelli Co-Skippers of Spindrift 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

Yann Guichard and Dona Bertarelli Co-Skippers of Spindrift 2 (Photo by George Bekris)

 

During the time they wait for the weather window the team also must go back across the atlantic to another sail another Spindrift stable boat and crew on the Spindrift 35 in a very busy season for Team Spindrift.  The entire Spindrift Crew is as assortment of outstanding sailors and record breakers.

Spindrift 2 crew:
Dona Bertarelli – Skipper
Yann Guichard – Skipper
Xavier Revil
Jacques Guichard
Erwan Tabarly
Antoine Carraz
Christophe Espagnon
Nicolas Texier
Jean Baptiste le Vaillant
Sébastien Marsset
François Morvan
Simone Gaeta
Erwan Israel

Dona Bertarelli on the slightly modified forward brace. (photo by George Bekris)

Dona Bertarelli on the slightly modified forward brace. (photo by George Bekris)

 

The other changes made to increase speed were to make the from adding a bit of cloth from the forward braces to increase the aerodynamics and lessen the windage. This lessening of  the drag  may only buy fractions, but fractions times thousands of miles equals time. With this record attempt every fraction of a second counts-

 

Spindrift_2_George_Bekris_2014_02

 

Once this record attempt is completed the boat will have a few small refits to prepare it for Yann Guichard’s solo trip on Spindrift 2 in the  upcoming Route du Rhum Saint-Malo Guadeloupe.  The grinding pedestal will be changed to a cycle style so Yann and use that to his advantage for tacking and gybing.  Those changes will make it easier to go from a double handed to solo effort.

Boat’s ready, crew’s  ready now all they need is Mother Nature to favor them.

For more information on the Team Spindrift sailing Check out www.spindrift-racing.com

 

Dona Bertarelli on the slightly modified forward brace. (photo by George Bekris)

Banque Populaire V Crew 2012 Jules Verne Trophy Winners (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire V Crew 2012 Jules Verne Trophy Winners (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

The fourteen sailors aboard the Maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V just entered history of offshore racing by becoming the fastest men around the globe with crew, after 45 days 13 hours 42 minutes 53 seconds of sailing*. Loïck Peyron and his crew improved the reference time of the Jules Verne Trophy held by Groupama 3 since March 2010 by 2 days 18 hours 1 minute and 59 seconds.
Historical record for Banque Populaire !

Departed on November 22nd at 09:31:42 Paris time (08:31:42 GMT), after having crossed the imaginary line between Ushant (Finistère-France) and Lizard Point (southern tip of England), the Maxi Banque Populaire V crossed the finish line of the Jules Verne Trophy at 23:14:35 Paris time (22:14:35  GMT) this Friday. She undertook this sailing around the world in 45 days 13 hours 42 minutes 53 seconds days at an average speed of 26.51 knots, covering a total distance of 29 002 miles.

Launched in August 2008 in Lorient (Morbihan-France),the giant trimaran holding the colours of Banque Populaire has also established several referenced time on various partials officially listed by the WSSRC for her first world tour:

Equator / Equator record in 32 days, 11 hours, 51 minutes and 30 seconds

Indian Ocean crossing record (Cape Agulhas / South of Tasmania) in 8 days 7 hours 22 minutes and 15 seconds

Maxi Trimaran Banque Populaire V ( Photo © B.STICHELBAUT/BPCE)

Maxi Trimaran Banque Populaire V ( Photo © B.STICHELBAUT/BPCE)

Under the leadership of the skipper Loïck Peyron, Thierry Chabagny, Florent Chastel, Thierry Duprey du Vorsent, Kevin Escoffier, Emmanuel Le Borgne, Frédéric Le Peutrec, Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant, Ronan Lucas, Pierre-Yves Moreau, Yvan Ravussin, Xavier Revil, Brian Thompson, Juan Vila and onshore router Marcel van Triest, are the new holders of the Jules Verne Trophy*.

Loïck Peyron, skipper of the Maxi Banque Populaire V : The feeling from the guys onboard : Emotion and Happiness ! We have filled a good part of the contract! We will now appreciate our victory between us and will return in Brest tomorrow morning to share this beautiful story with everyone. Our memories are full of wonderful images: the departure, icebergs, albatrosses, the Kerguelen Islands… When you sail around the world in 45 days, you see many things. The only one we did not get is Cape Horn but this frustration is quickly forgotten with the record we now have in hands. We are very proud !

Brian Thompson :  “Everyone is really excited on board and we are looking forward to seeing everybody tomorrow morning. This has been an incredible trip around the planet, almost a dream ride. And that is because of the quality of the boat, of the preparation and most of all to the incredible crew on board. I am very fortunate to have sailed with Loïck, the best all round multihull sailor there is, and the rest of the team that are so talented, industrious, dedicated, fun and welcoming to an English guy with schoolboy French! It feels absolutely fantastic. At the same time, to become the first Briton to sail around the world non-stop 4 times, is just amazing and feels very special”

Banque Populaire V Crew Celebrate Winning The Jules Verne Trophee (Photo curtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire V Crew Celebrate Winning The Jules Verne Trophee (Photo curtesy of BPCE)

JULES VERNE TROPHY

Start date and time : November 22nd 2011 at 09:31:42 Paris time (08:31:42 GMT)
Arrival date and time at Ushant: January 6th 2012 at 23:14:35 Paris time (22:14:35  GMT)
Distance: 29 002 miles
Average speed : 26.51 knots
New reference time on the Jules Verne Trophy* : 45 days 13 hours 42 minutes 53 seconds
Time difference with Groupama 3’s record in 2010: 2 days 18 hours 1 minute and 59 seconds
* Under the WSSRC approval (World Sailing Speed ??Record Council).

Loïck Peyron and his crew are expected at the Marina du Château, quai Jean-Francois La Perouse in Brest (France) at around 10:30am this Saturday, January 7th.

Banque Populaire Equator (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire Equator (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire Crew celebrate breaking the equator to equator record (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire Crew celebrate breaking the equator to equator record (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Since 12 :17 :30 (French time) this Friday, Loïck Peyron and his men are back in the Northern Hemisphere, 38 days 2 hours 45 minutes and 48 seconds * after leaving Ushant. With this outstanding performance, the Maxi Banque Populaire V not only writes a new distinction to his logbook, but also improves the partial Equator to Equator with a lead of 3 days 18 hours 24 minutes over Groupama 3 in 2010 but above all, faster than any other sailing boat on this race. A good sign for the fourteen sailors entering their final week at sea.
With this new partial shattered, the Maxi Banque Populaire V carries on falling records on her attempt on the Jules Verne Trophy. 32 days 11 hours 51 minutes and 30 seconds * after entering the southern hemisphere, the fourteen record’s hunters shattered the time set in 2005 by Bruno Peyron aboard Orange II, improving it by more than one day. Still enjoying mild conditions, the crew of the Maxi Banque Populaire V, by the voice of his skipper, savors the moment of the crossing: “We crossed the equator at high speed. We are sailing at 35 knots, on a sea almost flat, it’s really fun !  The boat does not suffer, and men even less. Everyone is excited, especially the fresh Cape Horners. Hello northern hemisphere, that’s not bad at all this record! It will now be increasingly difficult to beat it but still feasible and that’s the good news …”. A natural enthusiasm shared by Thierry Duprey du Vorsent, helmsman / trimmer on board, who joined today’s radio vacation :  “We are in the northern hemisphere for a few minutes and it already seems like being on our usual playground. It’s been thirty-two days since we left the Northern Hemisphere, which roughly accounts for three quarters of the time in the South and one quarter in the North. It brings us closer to home, which is good. The sailing conditions are beautiful, the sea is completely flat and it is almost straight on the road. There are very little squalls, the nights are quiet, starry … we really encounter exceptional conditions and we could not ask for more, including the boat. The weather conditions enable us to break the record but our anxiety is coming from the technique. We have sailed 20,000 miles without making any pit stop, we must keep the equipment in good shape.”

 

Loick Peyron smiles as Banque Populaire crosses the equator setting a new record (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Loick Peyron smiles as Banque Populaire crosses the equator setting a new record (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

For Brian Thompson, this passage to the North was even more particular: “I was lucky enough to be on the helm doing 35 knots as we counted down 0.02S, 0.01S, 0.01N!! The 3rd small bottle of Champagne we have carried was opened, and some of the bubbly nectar is first given to Neptune, to thank him for a safe passage through the Southern Seas..Then comes the saucisson and the Toblerone, all being shared between the crew and that God of the Sea.”
24,063 miles already in the wake

This return in the North is not the finish line and on board, we specifically know that even after 24 063 miles undergone smoothly, nothing is settled yet. Vigilance is still more than ever a must, as the final conditions for the final stretch ahead appears nicely. With a lead of 1 432 miles and three days advance on Groupama 3 around the same time, a certain serenity sets in, especially as the inter-tropical convergence zone is seen as particularly friendly as recalled Thierry Duprey du Vorsent “The Doldrums are not very active, and thanks to our western position, it should be easy to get through. This will be one of the first times I pass them without a transition zone of dead calm on a single board. Again, we are lucky. We will have to get dressed again in two or three days and get the fleeces and foul weather gears out again. But we will accept it more easily as the finish line won’t be far !”
A fighter named Banque Populaire V

With an average of 26.31 knots since leaving Ushant on November 21st, Loïck Peyron and his men have significantly reduced the time and distance, leaving their fans admiring. Rarely a boat will have scrolled through that amount of miles and still demonstrating such reliability. Qualities that the skipper did not fail to mention this afternoon: “Last night, around 6pm, we were off the coast of Recife in Brazil while we were still off Cape Horn less than a week ago. The Maxi Banque Populaire V is a unique fighter on the planet. We should return to Brest in a week and oddly, it promises to be the most week-long of this round the world course.” But before seeing the end of this last week, the fourteen men still have to compose with the North Atlantic sea before entering the great history of offshore sailing.

* subject to approval and ratification by the WSSRC (World Sailing Speed Record Council)

Maxi Banque Populaire V crew

Hors quart
Loïck Peyron Skipper
Juan Vila Navigateur, Responsable électronique et informatique

Quart n°1
Yvan Ravussin Chef de quart, responsable composite
Brian Thompson Barreur/ Régleur
Pierre Yves Moreau Régleur, Responsable mécanique et hydraulique
Thierry Chabagny N°1/ Barreur/ Régleur, Responsable accastillage et voiles

Quart n°2
Frédéric Le Peutrec Chef de quart
Emmanuel Le Borgne Barreur/ Régleur, Responsable médical
Thierry Duprey Du Vorsent Barreur/ Régleur, Responsable mécanique
Ronan Lucas N°1/ Régleur, Responsable sécurité

Quart n°3
Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant Chef de Quart, responsable voile
Kevin Escoffier Barreur/ Régleur, Responsable vidéo et structure
Xavier Revil Barreur/ Régleur, Responsable avitaillement à bord
Florent Chastel N°1/ Régleur, Responsable médical

Marcel Van Triest Routeur à terre

To follow Maxi Banque Populaire V’s Trophy

Cliquez ici pour visionner la projection sphérique de la cartographie

Cliquez ici pour visionner la cartographie  (mises à jour toutes les heures) 

 

The record figures

Reference time of the Jules Verne Trophy
Groupama 3 (Franck Cammas) – 48 days 7 hours 44 minutes 52 seconds

Record to beat
To become the new record holder, the Maxi Banque Populaire V has to be back no later than Monday, January 9th 2012 at 16:15:34 GMT.

Lead / Delay at 4pm
1436.2 miles lead on the reference time

Sailing time since departure :
38 days 07 hours 47 minutes 26 seconds or 3 days 18 hours 24 minutes less than Groupama 3 in 2010.

 

Maxi Banque Populaire V’s table hunting on her record attempt on the Jules Verne Trophy

Distance Ushant-Equator:  crossed on the 28/11/2011 at 00:26:52 am, French time.
In 5d 14h 55mn 10s of navigation, Loïck Peyron and his 13 teammates realize the fastest time on the distance from Ushant.

Distance Ouessant-Equateur 
: le 28/11/2011 à 00h 26mn 52 sec, heure française. 
En 5j 14h 55mn 10s de navigation, Loïck Peyron et ses 13 équipiers réalisent le meilleur temps sur la distance depuis Ouessant.

Distance Ushant – Cape of Good Hope:  crossed on the 4/12/20 at 07:20 am, French time.
In 11 days 21 hours 48 minutes and 18 seconds, Loïck Peyron and his 13 teammates realize the fastest time over the distance established between Ushant and Cape of Good Hope, until then hold by Groupama 3 in 2008 in 13 days 06 hours 1 minute.

In 2010, Groupama took 14 days 13 hours 31 minutes and 43 seconds to reach the Cape of Good Hope, Banque Populaire V thus improves this time of 2 days 15 hours 43 minutes and 25 seconds.

Ushant – Cape Leeuwin: crossed on the 10/12/2011 at 9:29 am, French time.
In 17 days 23 hours 57 minutes and 18 seconds, Loïck Peyron and his 13 teammates realize the record for the distance established between Ushant and Cape Leeuwin, which was previously of 21 days 14 hours and 43 seconds in 2008 hold by Groupama on her first attempt.

In 2010, Groupama took 21 days 14 hours 21 minutes and 54 seconds to reach the Cape Leeuwin

Ushant – Cape Horn: crossed on the 23/12/2011 at 7:50:30, French time
The Maxi Banque Populaire V took 30 days, 22 hours, 18 minutes, 48 ​​seconds since crossing the start line off Ushant to achieve this transition, a lead of more than one day on the reference time on the Jules Verne Trophy.

Pacific crossing time of the Maxi Banque Populaire V: 10 days 15 hours 7 minutes 15 seconds, or 1 day 20 hours 59 minutes 15 seconds longer than Orange II, who holds the record of this stretch in 8 days 18 hours 8 minutes.

Banque Populaire V enters the North Atlantic (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire V enters the North Atlantic (Photo courtesy of BPCE)

Banque Populaire Rounding Cape Horn (Photo courtesy BPCE)

Banque Populaire Rounding Cape Horn (Photo courtesy BPCE)

It was 7:50:30am on 23rd December (Paris time), after 30 days 22 hours 18 minutes and 48 seconds at sea, when the Maxi Banque Populaire V crossed the southern tip of the Americas and with it the last of the three capes of the course of the Jules Verne Trophy: the famous Horn. By posting a time of 10 days 15 hours 7 minutes and 15 seconds on the Pacific, Loïck Peyron and his men leave to Bruno, the elder brother of the skipper, the absolute record for the distance. The close proximity of a return in the Atlantic and the prospect of accelerating prevail on any award for the fourteen sailors on board.

 
That’s it! After hectic days and conditions that did not leave any time for resting, the men of the Maxi trimaran were waiting for this famous and mythical Cape Horn as a reward. After the wind returned and the high pressure ridge yesterday, good news falls on board. However, the rookies won’t get the right to get their souvenir photo, the sea conditions being too rough close to the rock and a very strong wind implied an offshore passage for the giant multihull. The symbol was still there with half of the crew getting into the sought-after circle of Cape Horners. From the beginning, a month ago off Ushant, the interval time between Cape Leeuwin and the way out of the Pacific is the first one not to fall into the hands of Loïck Peyron and his crew, the crew of Orange II Bruno Peyron remain holders with 8 days 18 hours and 8 minutes, it is to say 1 day 20 hours 59 minutes and 15 seconds better. For the wink, we can note that on board, Florent Chastel* remains the fastest man crossing the Pacific. Otherwise, it is a troop leader in good shape that commented on the event of the day: “It was not possible to sail closer to Cape Horn, sea conditions are already not bad here we are, and are even stronger next to the Rock. The fresh applicants are granted Cape Horners and they are thrilled! Conditions now allow us to get going on a little bit more than what was possible a week ago or ten days, because today we have only one day in advance. ”

* Florent was indeed part of the Orange II crew.

 
A quick ascent towards Equator?
Get going, the word is out and back after being confronted with ice depression at first, followed by a ridge and the absence of wind in a second, having put aside any notion of performance. But on board, we know that there is still an ocean to cross before the Grail and no one would think to put aside the critical management of the machine. Their role is to look at the clock but above all to continue protect the boat as they have done so far. With winds recorded at up to 40 knots last night, the elements reminded them of the facts. Until tomorrow, the sailors will continue flirting with the border of the Pacific pursuing a road heading east, to South Georgia, waiting for the opportune time to jibe. Then will ring the deliverance bell back in the Atlantic and return to a north route to the Equator: “The wind will ease off all day today and reinforce tomorrow, North West of a depression centered on South Georgia. Once we will have gibed, we will be able to get to the North and warmer conditions. I might reach the Equator faster than I have ever done. It should be done in better times than Franck Cammas and his crew, and the all-time record held by Bruno, my brother. ”

 

Day of major changes
A potentially ideal scenario for the coming days, as Marcel van Triest, onshore router detailed at mid-day: “They will have a sea relatively tough and will have to make this detour by South Georgia. Tomorrow morning, they will jibe an head north. This will be the day of the big changes. For now, they should be very fast until Uruguay. Then there will be a transition off Brazil. They should reach the Equator in seven to eight days, which is a very decent time. In the end, it is not impossible to approach the 45 days … ”

 The record in numbers

Record to beat :
To become the new record holder, the Maxi Banque Populaire V has to be back no later than Monday, January 9, 2012 at 5pm 15min and 34s (Paris time).

Reference time :

Groupama 3 (Franck Cammas) –  48 days 7 hours 44 minutes 52 seconds

Cape Horn crossing time:

23rd December 2011 – 7pm 50 minutes 30 seconds
Average seabed speed since the start : 26.7 knots
Lead on the Cape Horn crossing record : 535 milles

Sailing time since the start: 30 days 22 hours 18 minutes 48 seconds or 1 day 6 hours 16 minutes less than Groupama 3 in 2010.
Pacific crossing Time: 10 days 15 hours 7 minutes 15 seconds or 1 day 20 hours 59 minutes 15 seconds longer than Orange II, which holds the record of this stretch in 8 days 18 hours 8 minutes.

Lead/delay at 4pm

552.1 milles on the record’s time