A view of a recent Newport Bermuda Race send-off for Class 3 of the St. David’s Lighthouse Division. Photo: Daniel Forster/PPL

The 195 boats that submitted entries before the 2018 Newport Bermuda Race“application for entry” deadline are anchored by the usual excellent turnout of nearly 150 cruiser- and cruiser/racer-style boats sailing in the St. David’s Lighthouse and Finisterre (Cruiser) divisions. The race, which is co-organized by The Cruising Club of America and the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, offers several other divisions for different types of boats and competitors, which truly makes this event seven races in one.

While some pre-start attrition is normal when a fleet faces 635 ocean miles across the Gulf Stream, a diverse fleet of 180 to 190 boats should cross the line on June 15th, crewed by a mix of both professional and amateur sailors. That would make it the biggest fleet since 2010, when 193 boats finished the race.

Among the entries in St. David’s and Finisterre divisions, the 2016 success of youth sailors guided by adult advisors aboard High Noon (link) has led to four entries by youth teams in 2018. There will also be new divisions of Multihulls and Superyachts, which have added seven boats to the fleet, the largest of which is the 112-foot Sparkman & Stephens design, Kawil.

Another key to the high entry total is the 20 boats entered in the Gibbs Hill Division, which is for high-performance racing boats that in many cases are steered and crewed professionally. Recognizing advances in offshore racing technology, the Bermuda Race Organizing Committee allowed entry this year by boats carrying water-ballasting systems and certain types of canting keels. In past years, Gibbs Hill typically has drawn 10 to 15 entries; in 2016, based on the high winds forecast in the days before the race, all of the Gibbs Hill entries elected not to compete.

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

“The BROC remains committed to the value of the race as an adventure and participation for its own sake,” says Jonathan Brewin, the event chairman and past commodore of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club. “The race is different than many competitions; it’s a chance to compete for an array of permanent trophies and be part of a history going back to 1906,” says Brewin, “but above all it’s a chance to challenge oneself and one’s crew to prepare to compete safely offshore at the highest level.”

 

Newport Bermuda Race Start (Photo by George Bekris)

The introduction of a Multihull Division was three years in development, and based on the standards adopted for 2018, not every multihull will be eligible to compete. Collaborating with an experienced cadre of multihull designers and sailors, the Cruising Club of America’s safety committee developed new ocean-racing safety standards for participating multihulls and set more rigorous safety training requirements than for monohull crews. In addition, the BROC collaborated with the Offshore Racing Association to create a new VPP handicap system for multihulls (ORR-MH) that was successfully tested in the 2017 Transpac Race.

See BermudaRace.com for news updates on the race. See Official Notice Board for current list of entries.

Genuine Risk At Start Of Bermuda Race (Photo by George Bekris )

Shockwave and Bella Mente (Photo by George Bekris)

Shockwave and Bella Mente (Photo by George Bekris)

By Talbot Wilson

Three boats had finished the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race by late Monday afternoon

— Shockwave, Bella Mente, Caol Ila R

George Sakellaris’ big white Richel/Pugh mini-maxi Shockwave crossed the finish line off Bermuda’s St. David’s Lighthouse Monday morning at 5:34 race time EDT (6:34AM local time). Her elapsed time was 63:04:11. Bella Mente, Hap Fauth’s 72 foot Judel/Vrolijk mini-maxi, followed by seven minutes with her time at 63:11:25. The two had battled head to head within sight of each almost continuously for over 635 miles.

Shockwave heading for a dawn finish off St David's Lighthouse. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

Shockwave heading for a dawn finish off St David’s Lighthouse. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

Caol Ila R, Alex Schaerer’s 68 foot Mills IRC racer, crossed third at 8:33 local time, three hours behind Shockwave at 66:03:52.

Based on preliminary ORR results, Shockwave stands first on corrected time in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division, Bella Mente is second and Caol Ila R is third.

The next boat on the course, the US Naval Academy TP52 Constellation, is expected to finish more than 16 hours after the leader on Monday night. The remainder of the fleet is caught in the fickle winds of a frontal zone, waiting for the system to drift east-southeast and weaken. The picture is not pretty for boats still on the course. Light conditions will prevail through Wednesday and maybe longer.

Robbie Doyle sailed his 12th Newport Bermuda Race as the “stratitician” on board George Sakellaris’ Shockwave.

Doyle said, “Different guys called different things for the general strategy. The navigator made a lot of big calls. We had to hunt to find the (Gulf) Stream… we never found the 4 knot real road to Bermuda. It had broken up before we got there. Forecasters had predicted it might, but they suggested we might get there before it would start to dismember. The Stream was really breaking up pretty quick.”

“We got a knot and a half out of it.” He continued, “The stream came around (motioning to indicate a southwest to northeast direction to southeast direction) and what happened is that this part (flow) stopped and decided it was going to reconnect itself eventually and just become a smooth stream. We got through it.”

When asked about the cold core eddy predicted below the flow, Doyle said, “We caught that eddy, but it was only a knot and a half of current; still nice because we had it for 40 nautical miles. It wasn’t the three knots we had fought to get to that point for.“

Congratulations to George Sakellaris and the team aboard Shockwave for winning line honors in this year’s race. The win adds to Shockwave’s growing list of recent victories, highlighted by their division win in the 2012 Newport-Bermuda Race, the 2013 Montego Bay, and the 2014 RORC Caribbean 600 Race. Originally launched in 2008 as Alpha Romero 3, Shockwave continues her winning ways.

George Sakellaris, owner of the first to finish yacht Shockwave celebrates with Gosling's Dark 'n Stormy drink with his crew on arrival at the Royal Bermuda YC dock. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

George Sakellaris, owner of the first to finish yacht Shockwave celebrates with Gosling’s Dark ‘n Stormy drink with his crew on arrival at the Royal Bermuda YC dock. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

Commander’s Weather
1) Frontal zone is located from 35/65w to 33n/70w to Savannah early this morning
a) This front will continue to drift ESE and weaken

2) An expanding area of light winds will develop along and N and S of the frontal zone
a) The shower and squall activity will be diminishing this morning and will become at most isolated this afternoon and tonight
b) The nice SW winds in Bermuda will become much lighter late today and tonight

3) By Tue morning, the frontal zone will be located from 35n/60 30w to 33n/65w to a weak low near 32-33n/74w
a) Light NE-E winds north of the front and very light SW-W winds south of the front
b) Shower/squall activity will be at most isolated and possibly non-existent

4) Wed will see the light wind conditions continuing
a) The frontal zone will be drifting N with light SW and S winds also spreading slowly north during the day

For scratch sheets, crew lists, and other information about the boats, go to Race Documents & Rules.

Twenty-nine of the two Newport Bermuda Lighthouse Divisions’ entries are also sailing the 25th Onion Patch Series, a tough triathlon of offshore racing. These Onion Patch racers have just sailed the NYYC 160th Annual Regatta presented by Rolex in Newport and will form the core of the June 27nd RBYC Anniversary Regatta which now has 32 entries. The RBYC Anniversary Regatta is open to all IRC or ORR rated yachts over 25 feet in Bermuda. Anniversary Regatta entries close at noon on June 25th. Information is online at www.onionpatchseries.com and at www.rbyc.bm.

www.BermudaRace.com — carries Newport Bermuda Race rules, news, videos, photos, history, and expert advice. Race news is also posted on the Newport Bermuda Race 2014 Facebook page and on Twitter at @BdaRace.

HIRO MARU and the Class 1 St. David's Lighthouse Division Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

HIRO MARU and the Class 1 St. David’s Lighthouse Division Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

It Was a Little Messy, but the Bermuda Race Fleet has Started

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

By John Rousmaniere

If it was more fun for  spectators than the sailors, the reason was the sea breeze that inched toward the starting line until it finally dominated the northerly.Newport. RI, June 20, 2014, 7 PM.  Who would have thought that spinnakers would be flown at the starts of two Newport Bermuda Races in a row?  The race did not gain its well-known nickname, “The Thrash to the Onion Patch,” because it’s a downwind sleigh ride, like the Transpac.  The 2012 start was a fast run before a fresh northerly for every one of the 165 boats in every class.  This year was a little more complicated for the 164 starters. As the five divisions in 14 classes got going over a period of two and one-half hours, the first half of the fleet in seven starts got away in a leftover northerly breeze under spinnaker.   Not so the last seven.  Like a typical summer day on Long Island Sound, the mouth of Narragansett Bay was full of confusion.

Some of the Class 2 fleet St. David's Lighthouse Division Start 2014  (Photo by George Bekris)

Some of the Class 2 fleet St. David’s Lighthouse Division Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

The afternoon’s winners appear to be the boats that started early, Classes 1, 2, and 3–the smaller and medium-size boats in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division.  With the light to moderate northerly on their stern, they tacked downwind to the buoy marking the outer reaches of Brenton Reef, and carried their chutes around the mark and onto the southeasterly course to Bermuda. When the southwester filled in like a light summer blanket, all they had to do was raise the jib, douse the spinnaker, and tack onto starboard, meanwhile holding the same course.

Newport_Bermuda_2014_george_bekris_June-20-2014_-1-001

One of the biggest of those winners may be Sinn Fein, the Cal 40 that’s always sailed well by Peter Rebovich, Sr., and his crew of family and friends from Raritan Yacht Club, in New Jersey.  The two-time winners of the St. David’s Lighthouse Division (in 2006 and 2008), they’ve been preoccupied by other concerns since the 2012 race: rebuilding their boat after she was nearly destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. Today they set the spinnaker promptly and effectively, found the right apparent wind angle, and pulled away. When last seen, Sinn Fein was on the far horizon, closehauled in the seabreeze and racing to Bermuda near the head of a clump of at least 50 other smaller boats. The Pantaenius tracker at 3 p.m. (about two hours after the Class 1 start) showed Sinn Fein slightly behind William Klein’s CC 40, Glim. We’ll know when we see later tracker readings (being sure to remember the 4-hour time delay) and a get a sense of the wind and wave conditions as the big fleet gets out into the Atlantic.

(Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

But at least everybody’s racing, and headed toward the Gulf Stream, where (the forecasters are telling us) they may find more to worry about than a shifty wind—such as squalls and big seas that could turn this race into a real thrash.The boats that started an hour or so later than Class 1 had any number of troubles as the seabreeze slowly pushed away the northerly. At one moment a Class 6 medium-size St. David’s Lighthouse boat with a red spinnaker up and pulling well on port tack was less than 25 yards abeam of another Class 6 boat with a green and yellow chute pulling well on starboard tack.  A few minutes later, the seabreeze reached the starting line in the mouth of Narragansett Bay just as Class 8 (large St. David’s boats) was making its final approach—some running in the dying northerly, others beating in the slowly building southerly.

(Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

 

For More Photos of the Newport Bermuda Race visit George Bekris Photography HERE 

 

 

– See more at bout the race at: http://bermudarace.com/little-messy-bermuda-race-fleet-started/#sthash.aMUaHBGw.dpuf

 

 

 Class 6 within the St David's Lighthouse division setting out for Bermuda during the last race. Photo Daniel Forster/PPL


Class 6 within the St David’s Lighthouse division setting out for Bermuda during the last race. Photo Daniel Forster/PPL

By Talbot Wilson

 How to Watch the Bermuda Race Start from Land or Sea.

With more than 160 racing boats in the mouth of Narragansett Bay on June 20th, the start of the Newport Bermuda Race will be a spectacular sight, whether you’re watching from the nearby shore or from a boat on the water. The first gun is scheduled for 12:50 with the first start scheduled for 1:00. The last start is approximately 2:30.

Because the race start is close to land, many spectators prefer to gather at shoreside viewing points on high ground, such as the Castle Hill Inn. Parking fees may be charged and there may be limitations on bringing food.

Spectator boats are permitted to watch the Bermuda Race start if they observe limit buoys, keep a careful lookout, and obey the instructions of Race Committee and U.S. Coast Guard personnel in official patrol boats. Because the water will be crowded and rough, small boats such as kayaks and canoes are strongly discouraged.

Charter boats offering day trips are numerous at Newport. Many are listed at http://www.discovernewport.org/recreation/boating-and-sailing/charters-and-excursions.

All spectators should be aware the use of drones (Unmanned Aircraft Systems, UAS) near outdoors public events has been banned in Rhode Island.

Please monitor CH 72 VHF for all race information and CH 69 for Patrol Boat communication.

Do not transmit on CH 72. It is reserved for the RC and competitors.

The scheduled time of the first warning signal is 12:50 p.m.

The first class is scheduled to start at 1:00 p.m. and subsequent classes start at 10-minute intervals.

The starting line is between the Sailing vessel AXIA(120’ Ketch) and a large yellow buoy near Castle Hill.

The regular spectator area is well outside and to the southwest of the orange inflatable marks surrounding the starting line and defining the Competitors Only Restricted Areas.

There is another pre-start restricted area South of the starting line on the course side. It lies between the port and starboard tack lay lines from either end of the starting line, and extends for 200 yards down the course from the starting line. The eastern side of the area will end at an Orange 8’ Tetrahedron approximately 200 meters south of the last dumpy.

The 49th Newport Bermuda Race is right around the corner. Home-based spectators can track their favorite yachts, skippers or crewmembers in the 635-mile ocean classic starting June 20 from Newport Rhode Island. All boats in the 2014 fleet will be provided with Yellowbrick tracking modules before the start. Bringing the competition to you as live as it can be, Pantaenius Race Tracking — www.pantaenius.com/NBRtracking — is your link to all the virtual action in the race. Pantaenius Yacht Insurance is the Tracker Sponsor for this year’s Newport Bermuda Race

Test the site ahead of time and also download the Yellowbrick app for mobile coverage wherever you are. Some browser updates may be needed. The Yellowbrick race viewer will run well on any web browsers released since 2012, namely:

  • Internet Explorer 10 & 11
  • Google Chrome 23 and upwards
  • Firefox 20 and upwards
  • Safari 6 and upwards

Updating your browser is normally a very easy process, and is good practice since it will also patch any security issues that may have been found since it was released.

In the Newport Bermuda Race this year, there will be a time delay in the early stages of the race to prevent competitors from using the positions of other yachts for tactical advantage.

Tracking will be delayed by 4 hours for the first 48 hours of the race and then go to near-real-time reports every 30 minutes from each yacht. Expect to see a jump forward after 48 hours to the yacht’s actual position. As yachts get within 15 miles of Bermuda the timing of reports will be more frequent.

For competitors using satellite links, a low bandwidth link for sat phones on boats will be available.

Newport Bermuda action starts Friday, June 20th, with the first warning signal scheduled for 12:50PM EDT in the East Passage of Narragansett Bay off Castle Hill Lighthouse in Newport Rhode Island. This year, 165 boats have entered in five divisions. These will be divided in classes of about 15 boats each plus a class for the ‘Spirit of Bermuda’ starting by herself in the Spirit of Tradition Division.

Twenty-nine of the two Newport Bermuda Lighthouse Divisions’ entries are also sailing the 25th Onion Patch Series, a tough triathlon of offshore racing. These Onion Patch racers have just sailed the New York Yacht Club 160th Annual Regatta presented by Rolex in Newport and form the core of the June 27nd Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Anniversary Regatta which now has 32 entries. The RBYC Anniversary Regatta is open to all IRC or ORR rated yachts over 25 feet in Bermuda. Anniversary Regatta entries close at noon on June 25th. Information is online at www.onionpatchseries.com.

The website — www.BermudaRace.com— carries Newport Bermuda Race rules, news, videos, photos, history, and expert advice. Race news is also posted on the Newport Bermuda Race 2014 Facebook page and on Twitter at @BdaRace.

2012 Newport Bermuda Yacht Race -start in Narragansett Bay Class 10 Gibbs Hill lighthouse division Rambler - USA 25555 - Custom 90 maxi  yacht skippered by  George David Belle Mente - USA 45 - 72ft mini maxi  yacht skippered by  Hap Fauth Team Tiburon Wizard -USA 4511 - Reichel Pugh 74 skippered by Mark E Watson III - USMMA Shockwave - USA 60272 - mini- maxi  yacht skippered by  George Skellaris Rima II - USA 55155 - Reichel Pugh 55  yacht skippered by  John G Brin Stark Raving Mad - USA 61011 - Swan 601 production  yacht skippered by  James C Madden Meanie - CAN 84248 - Reichel Pugh 52   yacht skippered by  Thomas Akin

The big yachts in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse trophy division at the start of the 2012 Newport Bermuda Race. Photo: Daniel Forster/PPL

 

2012 Newport Bermuda Race

Shockwave (R) and Bella Mente (L) should be locked in a battle for line honors in the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race. Shockwave was first on corrected time in 2012 and won the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy. Bella Mente came third behind Rambler. Rambler got line honors and smashed the Newport Bermuda elapse time record.
2012 Newport Bermuda Race
Copyright 2012 Daniel Forster/PPL

 

By John Rousmaniere

Newport RI, April 2, 2014). As of the April 1 deadline, 180 applications for entry have been received for the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race that will start on June 20 off Castle Hill in Newport. Broken down by the biennial race’s five divisions, the entries are: St. David’s Lighthouse, 91 boats; Gibbs Hill Lighthouse, 10; Cruiser, 36; Double-Handed, 26; Open, 2. Fifty-one captains have indicated that this is their boats’ first Newport Bermuda Race. The 2012 race had 165 starters.

Officials of the Bermuda Race Organizing Committee advise that entry numbers and divisional assignments may change. Sixteen entering captains are undecided about which division to enter, and more applications for entry are expected at the race’s website, BermudaRace.com, at the Guide to Entry button. Late entries may be subject to a time penalty.

In the St. David’s Lighthouse Division, returnees include many 2012 prizewinners and the division’s winning boats in the last four races, Rives Potts’s Carina (winner in 2010 and 2012) and Peter Rebovich’s Sinn Fein (2006 and 2008). Also in this division are two highly competitive classic wooden yawls, Matt Brooks’s Transpac winner Dorade and 2012 Bermuda Race class winner Black Watch, commanded by John Melvin.

A close race is anticipated in the Gibbs Hill Division between George Sakellaris’ Shockwave and Hap Fauth’s Bella Mente. In 2012 Shockwave, pressed hard by Belle Mente, won both this division and the North Rock Beacon Trophy as the race’s top boat under the IRC Rule. Both boats broke the race elapsed time record.

Entries in the Cruiser and Double-Handed divisions are running ahead of their 2012 levels. Cruiser Division runner-up True, sailed by Howard Hodgson, Jr., will be back with other high finishers, including Brad Willauer’s Breezing Up and Chris Culver’s Cetacea. Returning in the extremely competitive Double-Handed Division are the 2012 race’s top four boats: Hewitt Gaynor’s Mireille, Joe Harris’ GryphonSolo2, Gardner Grant’s Alibi, and Jason Richter’s Paladin.

Jim Muldoon’s veteran Donnybrook has entered the Open Division. Spirit of Bermuda, a replica of a traditional Bermuda trading vessel and 2012 Bermuda Race entry, will return for another 635-mile sprint across the Gulf Stream.

An updated list of applicants for entry is at http://bermudarace.com/2014-race/race-applicants/ . For more information about the Newport Bermuda Race, visitBermudaRace.com.

Important dates on the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race calendar include the following:

Forms submitted and fees paid, May 16
Boat measurement data submitted, May 22
Crew information submitted, June 1
Boat inspection deadline, June 6
Onion Patch Series/Navigator’s Race Series, NYYC Annual Regatta, Newport, June 14-15
Check-in at race headquarters (NYYC Sailing Center, Harbour Court), June 15-18
US Sailing Sanctioned Safety at Sea Seminar, Newport, June 18. Register at safety@bermudarace.com
Gosling’s Rum Newport Shipyard Crew Party, Newport, June 18
Captains Meeting sponsored by Hinckley Yachts, Jane Pickens Theater, June 19
Newport Bermuda Race start, June 20
Onion Patch Series/ Navigator’s Race Series, RBYC Anniversary Regatta and Welcome Party, Bermuda, June 27
Newport Bermuda Prize Ceremony, June 28

2012 Newport Bermu Only one skipper has won the Newport Bermuda Race three times. Carleton Mitchell won three in a row in 1956-58-69. And Mitchell won those three races all with Finisterre, the most famous of the Sparkman & Stephens centerboard yawls. In 2010, Peter Rebovich was poised to repeat the feat in Sinn Fein (1818), his classic 51-year-old stock Cal 40, but a sterling performance by Rives Potts in his McCurdy & Rhodes 48 Carina swept away his chance for three St. David’s Lighthouse Trophies in a row. Rebovich had to rebuild Sinn Fein after Hurricane Sandy and now he is back as both he and Rives Potts each come to the line again looking for their third wins in the same boat. ©2012 Daniel Forster/PPLda Race


Only one skipper has won the Newport Bermuda Race three times. Carleton Mitchell won three in a row in 1956-58-69. And Mitchell won those three races all with Finisterre, the most famous of the Sparkman & Stephens centerboard yawls. In 2010, Peter Rebovich was poised to repeat the feat in Sinn Fein (1818), his classic 51-year-old stock Cal 40, but a sterling performance by Rives Potts in his McCurdy & Rhodes 48 Carina swept away his chance for three St. David’s Lighthouse Trophies in a row. Rebovich had to rebuild Sinn Fein after Hurricane Sandy and now he is back as both he and Rives Potts each come to the line again looking for their third wins in the same boat. ©2012 Daniel Forster/PPL

Bermuda is the Official Host of the Newport Bermuda Race. For details on all the excitement and events Bermuda has to offer, call your travel agent or visithttp://www.bermudatourism.com.

Gosling’s Rum is the Official Rum of the Newport Bermuda Race. Try a Dark ‘n Stormy®, the taste of Bermuda. For more information visit www.goslingsrum.com

Pantaenius American Yacht Insurance is the official lead sponsor of the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race’s tracker, which will be visible on the race’s web site:http://www.pantaenius.com/en/american-yacht-insurance.html/

Newport Shipyard is the Official Shipyard of the Newport Bermuda Race. Come get ready for Bermuda, swap strategies, and walk the docks among veteran sailors.http://www.NewportShipyard.com/

Vineyard Vines is the Official Newport Bermuda Tie Sponsor providing commemorative ties to the afterguard of the competing yachts. http://www.vineyardvines.com/

Brewer Yacht Yard Group is the Official Boat Preparation Resource of the Newport Bermuda Race. Experienced staff at Brewer yards from New York to Maine will help you and your crew plan and prepare for a successful race. http://www.byy.com/

Hinckley Yachts is the Official Sponsor of the Captains Meeting for the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race, and will provide the check-in boat and other boats for official observers. http://www.hinckleyyachts.c

OCENS is the Newport Bermuda Race’s Official Race Communications Partner. Satellite communications and weather information for the race and the world.http://www.ocens.com/nb

2012 Newport B Off to a lighthouse winning start, Rives Potts in Carina (L 315) gets his nose out in front in the start of Class 3 of the 2012 Newport Bermuda Race. Potts won his second St. David's Lighthouse Trophy. NA23, Defiance (blue & gold spinnaker, was 2nd in the division. Only one skipper has won the Newport Bermuda Race three times. Carleton Mitchell won three in a row in 1956-58-69. And Mitchell won those three races all with Finisterre, the most famous of the Sparkman & Stephens centerboard yawls. Potts has a chance to tie that record this year.  2012 Newport Bermuda Race Copyright 2012 Daniel Forster/PPLermuda Race


Off to a lighthouse winning start, Rives Potts in Carina (L 315) gets his nose out in front in the start of Class 3 of the 2012 Newport Bermuda Race. Potts won his second St. David’s Lighthouse Trophy. NA23, Defiance (blue & gold spinnaker, was 2nd in the division. Only one skipper has won the Newport Bermuda Race three times. Carleton Mitchell won three in a row in 1956-58-69. And Mitchell won those three races all with Finisterre, the most famous of the Sparkman & Stephens centerboard yawls. Potts has a chance to tie that record this year.
2012 Newport Bermuda Race
Copyright 2012 Daniel Forster/PPL

The Class 5 start of the 2010 Royal Bermuda YC Anniversary Regatta, stage 3 of the Onion Patch Series. In the 2-race regatta, the first race is a W-L in the Great Sound and the second is a 'Tour of the Island' starting in the Great Sound and finishing in Hamilton Harbour off the RBYC marina. The new Navigators Race will be a Tour of the Island with a new twist. Credit Talbot Wilson

The Class 5 start of the 2010 Royal Bermuda YC Anniversary Regatta, stage 3 of the Onion Patch Series. In the 2-race regatta, the first race is a W-L in the Great Sound and the second is a ‘Tour of the Island’ starting in the Great Sound and finishing in Hamilton Harbour off the RBYC marina. The new Navigators Race will be a Tour of the Island with a new twist. Credit Talbot Wilson

By Talbot Wilson 

To race the 50th anniversary Onion Patch Series, boats must race to Bermuda. The deadline for entry in the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race (without a potential late-entry time penalty) is April 1st. Enter now at the race portal: http://bermudarace.com/entry/race-entry-portal/. For Onion Patch Series details seehttp://www.onionpatchseries.com/.

Hamilton Bermuda, March 23, 2014— As the three-event Onion Patch Series turns 50 this summer, organizers have decided to add a new, more relaxed Navigators Race Series format for the 25th running of the traditional series. The new series for more cruiser oriented race programs will be scored with ORR ratings. The traditional series raced for the Onion Patch Trophy and Henry B. DuPont Trophy will continue to be scored under IRC.

The new Navigators Race Series will allow those skippers not interested in racing intense windward-leeward courses in the New York Yacht Club 160th Annual Regatta or not interested in racing on a Great Sound course with the professional grand prix boats and more intense racers in the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club‘s Anniversary Regatta to sail separate scenic and fun “round the buoys” races in their own series.

One Navigators Race will be scheduled each day for the June 14-15 NYYC Annual Regatta in Newport RI. The group will then sail to Bermuda in their regular Bermuda Race divisions and be scored against each other as an overlay event. On Friday June 27th, they will sail one race in the RBYC Anniversary Regatta around a scenic course following the start of the last regular Onion Patch Series Anniversary Regatta race.

All yachts racing in the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race are invited to compete in this inaugural three-event Onion Patch Navigators Race Series. ORR Scoring will be used in Newport and in Bermuda for ‘Navigators’, so all yachts in the Newport Bermuda Race, which uses that system for all divisions, will be eligible. The traditional Onion Patch Series races under IRC ratings, so only the Newport Bermuda’s Gibbs Hill and St. David’s Division’s IRC entries may compete for those prizes. See http://www.onionpatchseries.com/.

The new series will have its own prizes for performance in the events and for the series. The top series prize will be dedicated to the late Richard “Dick” Kempe who was instrumental in establishing the Cruiser Division of the Newport Bermuda Race in 1990.

“We began planning for this new series last fall,” said series Chairman and past RBYC Commodore Brian Billings. “We had been talking about adding a fun-style race for boats in Royal Bermuda’s Anniversary Regatta. We wanted to do an event for our foreign friends that would get them out sailing locally and allow them to experience more of what Bermuda has to offer cruising sailors.”

“With the help of past Newport Bermuda Chairman John Winder,” Billings noted, “we approached the NYYC race committee with the idea. John had been discussing their use of ORR for two round the buoys races in their regatta. Steve Benjamin of NYYC supported the idea. So here we are 4 months later with a new addition to a historic series.”

“Our initial goal was to have 50 boats in the Onion Patch Series,” Billings added. “Maybe with this new Navigators Race series we should target for 75 boats. And remember, if you can’t make the whole series, you can still sail these fun Navigator Race courses in Newport or Bermuda.”

Of course, to race the Onion Patch Series boats must race to Bermuda. The deadline for entry in the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race (without a potential late entry time penalty) is April 1st. Enter now at the race portal: http://bermudarace.com/entry/race-entry-portal/.

Separate entry in the NYYC Annual Regatta, the RBYC Anniversary Regatta and the Series will be from the NYYC web site.

In 1962, the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club donated the Onion Patch Trophy for the series and the first competition was held in conjunction with the 1964 Newport Bermuda Race. Now, in 2014, the series will be sailed for the 25th time. The series now consists of racing in the New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta, the Cruising Club of America-Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Newport Bermuda Race and the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Anniversary Regatta.

Include all three events in this tough triathlon of sailboat racing. It’s a hard-fought series sailed over a scant three consecutive weeks in June. Ask anyone who has done it… The Onion Patch is one tough series to win. It is a challenge to yacht, skipper and crew to prevail in these three spectacular events and venues.

Be in Newport June 14, 2014 for the NYYC 160th Annual Regatta and make the 50th Anniversary Onion Patch Series the biggest and best ever.

Randall Baldwin (Ridgefield Connecticut), sailing his Taylor 42 Cabady to the final finish of the RBYC Anniversary Regatta, took home the Henry B. du Pont Trophy for first place in the 2008 Onion Patch Series. Of Onion Patch boats, he finished second in the New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta, first in the Newport Bermuda Race and ninth in the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Anniversary Regatta for 2, 1.25, 9 and a total of 12.25 points. His boat and crew gave an all-round winning performance.  ©Talbot Wilson

Randall Baldwin (Ridgefield Connecticut), sailing his Taylor 42 Cabady to the final finish of the RBYC Anniversary Regatta, took home the Henry B. du Pont Trophy for first place in the 2008 Onion Patch Series. Of Onion Patch boats, he finished second in the New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta, first in the Newport Bermuda Race and ninth in the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Anniversary Regatta for 2, 1.25, 9 and a total of 12.25 points. His boat and crew gave an all-round winning performance.
©Talbot Wilson

The 52' classic wooden yawl Dorade (R), built in 1929 for designer Olin Stephens, returns under owner Matt Brooks. Last year Dorade won the Transpac Race in the Pacific Ocean.   Dorade sailed two Newport Bermuda Races under Olin Stephens and this will be the second under Matt Brooks, matching the early campaign under her designer. ©2012 Daniel Forster/PPL

The 52′ classic wooden yawl Dorade (R), built in 1929 for designer Olin Stephens, returns under owner Matt Brooks. Last year Dorade won the Transpac Race in the Pacific Ocean. Dorade sailed two Newport Bermuda Races under Olin Stephens and this will be the second under Matt Brooks, matching the early campaign under her designer. ©2012 Daniel Forster/PPL

By Fred Deichmann, Chairman, 2014 Bermuda Race Organizing Committee

Newport RI, March 17, 2014— With two weeks to go before Applications for Entry close on April 1st for the 49th Newport Bermuda Race, 158 boats have filed Applications for Entry.  Many boats long identified with the race are coming back, and there is an enthusiastic response from first-time skippers, who make up 20 percent of the total.

The variety of entries is notable. Among the returnees are 2006 and 2008 St. David’s Lighthouse Division winner Pete Rebovich with his family crew in Sinn Fein. Remarkably, the nearly 50-year-old Cal 40 was almost entirely destroyed in superstorm Sandy in 2012, but she’s been rebuilt and will be on the starting line on June 20.  The famous Classic wooden 52′ yawl Dorade, built in 1929 for designer Olin Stephens, returns under owner Matt Brooks. Last year Dorade won the Transpac Race in the Pacific Ocean.

Rives Potts’ 2010 and 2012 St. David’s winner Carina and Hap Fauth’s perennial Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division contender and elapsed time top finisher Bella Mente will be at the starting line. Kodiak, winner of the big boat class in St. David’s in 2012 under skipper Llwyd Ecclestone, is also racing.

Spirit of Bermuda, owned by the Bermuda Sloop Foundation and modeled on 19th century Bermudan commercial ships, will race again. In 2012, sailing with a crew of Bermuda youngsters, she was awarded a special seamanship award for her efforts to assist another racing boat that was in trouble.

Applications for Entry are due by 1700 hours, April 1after which applicants may incur a time penalty.  The process begins in the race entry portal on the race web site. Also online are a complete guide to entryrace documents and requirements and an extensive FAQ, all found under the “Entry” section of BermudaRace.com.

 As the entry window closes, Bermuda Race Organizers are proud of the tremendous diversity and great quality of this fleet.  Please join us for the 2014 Thrash to the Onion Patch.

More information about the race is at http://BermudaRace.com and on Facebook and Twitter.

Important dates on the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race calendar include the following:

  • Application for entry deadline, April 1
  • Boat inspection begins, March 10
  • Cruising Club of America-Newport Bermuda Race Safety Weekend, Newport RI,  March 15-16
  • Forms submitted and fees paid, May 16
  • Boat measurement data submitted, May 22
  • Crew information submitted, June 1
  • Boat inspection deadline, June 6
  • Onion Patch Series NYYC Annual Regatta day races, Newport RI, June 14-15
  • Check-in at race HQ (New York Yacht Club Sailing Center, Harbour Court), June 15-18
  • Gosling’s Rum Newport Shipyard Crew Party, Newport RI, June 18 at Newport Shipyard
  • Captains Meeting, June 19
  • Newport Bermuda Race start, June 20
  • Onion Patch Series RBYC Anniversary Regatta and Welcome Party, Bermuda, June 27
  • Newport Bermuda Prize Ceremony, June 28.

Bermuda is the Official Host of the Newport Bermuda Race. For details on all the excitement and events Bermuda has to offer, call your travel agent or visit http://www.bermudatourism.com.

Gosling’s Rum is the Official Rum of the Newport Bermuda Race. Try a Dark ‘n Stormy®, the taste of Bermuda. For more information visit www.goslingsrum.com

Pantaenius American Yacht Insurance is the official lead sponsor of the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race’s tracker, which will be visible on the race’s web site: http://www.pantaenius.com/en/american-yacht-insurance.html/ 

Newport Shipyard is the Official Shipyard of the Newport Bermuda Race. Come get ready for Bermuda, swap strategies, and walk the docks among veteran sailors. http://www.NewportShipyard.com/

Vineyard Vines is the Official Newport Bermuda Tie Sponsor providing commemorative ties to the afterguard of the competing yachts. http://www.vineyardvines.com/

Brewer Yacht Yard Group is the Official Boat Preparation Resource of the Newport Bermuda Race.  Experienced staff at Brewer yards from New York to Maine will help you and your crew plan and prepare for a successful race. http://www.byy.com/   

Hinckley Yachts is the Official Sponsor of the Captains Meeting for the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race, and will provide the check-in boat and other boats for official observers. http://www.hinckleyyachts.com

OCENS is the Newport Bermuda Race’s Official Race Communications Partner. Satellite communications and weather information for the race and the world.  http://www.ocens.com/nb 

Black Watch by Talbot  Wilson

Black Watch US71 (R), the 1938 restored classic wooden yawl and a class winner in 2012 now under the command of John Melvin, will return for 2014. Here she is as the 48th Newport Bermuda Race got underway with the first spinnaker start since 2004. There were 165 boats in 17 classes and 6 divisions. (Photo by Talbot Wilson)

 

By John Rousmaniere

Newport RI, February 23, 2014— With 120 applications for entry received for the upcoming 49th Newport Bermuda Race, the race’s organizers are noting a larger than usual proportion of first-time entries as the April 1 entry deadline approaches. More than one-fourth of the applications are from boats that have not sailed the race. “It’s satisfying to see so many experienced sailors entering a boat in the race for the first time,” said Bermuda Race Organizing Committee Chairman Fred Deichmann.

Registration for the Bermuda Race is online at http://BermudaRace.com. Race applications submitted after the April 1 deadline will be subject to a penalty applied to the boat’s corrected time.

Deichmann added that the race’s safety at sea seminar on March 15 at Newport is experiencing heavier than usual signup. He urged sailors to register soon at http://BermudaRace.com/entry/safety-at-sea-seminars.

Deichmann announced that the Newport Bermuda Race will again participate in the Sailors for the Sea Clean Regatta Program. “We are asking sailors to help the race achieve Gold Level status for the 2014 race by taking steps to protect the environment,” he said. “Sailors are deeply concerned about the health of the waters we sail in.” The race starts in the mouth of Narragansett Bay, crosses the Gulf Stream, and finishes in the fragile waters off Bermuda’s reefs. Crews follow environmentally friendly routines according to “leave no trace” and other guidelines. For example, because a big concern is keeping plastic out of the ocean, sailors use non-disposable drinking mugs.

The 2012 Newport Bermuda Race was awarded Silver Level status by Sailors for the Sea, a non-profit organization committed to ocean stewardship. Details about the Clean Regatta program can be found on the Sailors for the Sea website, http://sailorsforthesea.org.

Concerning the March 15 safety at sea seminar, Deichmann urged captains to plan ahead and determine if the crew satisfies race rules on seminar attendance, and also to send one crewmember each to Sunday’s medical and race preparation seminars. The safety seminar can be used to help fill out a crew. Red nametags will be issued to sailors seeking a berth, and blue nametags will be worn by captains needing crew for the race or the return voyage.

The roster of entries so far in the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race includes Rives Potts’ Carina, St. David’s Lighthouse Division overall winner in 2010 and 2012. George Sakellaris’ Shockwave will attempt to defend her Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division corrected time victory in 2012, when she and Hap Fauth’s Bella Mente (also returning) dueled bow to bow before Bella Mente finished merely two minutes ahead after 41 hours of sailing. In the Double-Handed Division, defending winner Hewitt Gaynor will return in his Mireille to match up against his longtime friendly competitor Richard du Moulin in Lora Ann.

Also competing again are the 1938 restored classic wooden yawl Black Watch, a class winner in 2012 now under the command of John Melvin, who had high finishes in previous races in his Concordia yawl Westray. Llwyd Ecclestone, the 1998 race winner, will return with his loyal crew in Kodiak. In 2012 they were first to finish in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division and won the Overall Performance Prize for the class winner with the largest victory margin.

More information about the race is at http://BermudaRace.com and on Facebook and Twitter.

###

Important dates on the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race calendar include the following:

· Application for entry deadline, April 1

· Boat inspection begins, March 10

· Cruising Club of America-Newport Bermuda Race Safety Weekend, Newport RI, March 15-16

· Forms submitted and fees paid, May 16

· Boat measurement data submitted, May 22

· Crew information submitted, June 1

· Boat inspection deadline, June 6

· Onion Patch Series NYYC Annual Regatta day races, Newport RI, June 14-15

· Check-in at race HQ (New York Yacht Club Sailing Center, Harbour Court), June 15-18

· Gosling’s Rum Newport Shipyard Crew Party, Newport RI, June 18 at Newport Shipyard

· Captains Meeting, June 19

· Newport Bermuda Race start, June 20

· Onion Patch Series RBYC Anniversary Regatta and Welcome Party, Bermuda, June 27

· Newport Bermuda Prize Ceremony, June 28.

Bermuda is the Official Host of the Newport Bermuda Race. For details on all the excitement and events Bermuda has to offer, call your travel agent or visithttp://www.bermudatourism.com.

Gosling’s Rum is the Official Rum of the Newport Bermuda Race. Try a Dark ‘n Stormy®, the taste of Bermuda. For more information visitwww.goslingsrum.com

Pantaenius American Yacht Insurance is the official lead sponsor of the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race’s tracker, which will be visible on the race’s web site: http://www.pantaenius.com/en/american-yacht-insurance.html/

Newport Shipyard is the Official Shipyard of the Newport Bermuda Race. Come get ready for Bermuda, swap strategies, and walk the docks among veteran sailors. http://www.NewportShipyard.com/

Vineyard Vines is the Official Newport Bermuda Tie Sponsor providing commemorative ties to the afterguard of the competing yachts.http://www.vineyardvines.com/

Brewer Yacht Yard Group is the Official Boat Preparation Resource of the Newport Bermuda Race. Experienced staff at Brewer yards from New York to Maine will help you and your crew plan and prepare for a successful race. http://www.byy.com/

Hinckley Yachts is the Official Sponsor of the Captains Meeting for the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race, and will provide the check-in boat and other boats for official observers. http://www.hinckleyyachts.com

OCENS is the Newport Bermuda Race’s Official Race Communications Partner. Satellite communications and weather information for the race and the world. http://www.ocens.com/nb

Finishing the Newport Bermuda Race Monday 18 June 2012 by Charles Anderson

Rives Potts steers ‘Carina’ to another Lighthouse Trophy for first place in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division, his second consecutive win, as his family filled crew hand out high fives after crossing the finish line in Bermuda, Newport Bermuda 2012. (Photo by Charles Anderson)