Volvos in Newport 14 May 2015  Photo © Dan Nerney

Volvos in Newport 14 May 2015  (Photo © Dan Nerney)

NEWPORT, RI (17 March 2017) – The public is invited to attend the Sail Newport Volvo Ocean Race press conference and Pep Rally on Tuesday, March 21 starting at 10:00 a.m.   The major announcement will feature speakers from the Volvo Ocean Race and Sail Newport.

The press conference will be held at Belle Mer, 2 Goat Island, Newport, RI, USA. The public is invited to attend as space permits and coffee will be served starting at 9:30 a.m. at Belle Mer.
“We’re encouraging sailing fans to come and help us show Newport’s excitement about the Volvo Ocean Race coming back to Rhode Island,” says Brad Read, executive director of Sail Newport.
Also, Sail Newport will host a reception to celebrate the announcement at the Clarke Cooke House, at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday.  Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and cash bar will be available.
The Volvo Ocean Race Newport Stopover in 2015 was a huge success as over 130,000 people attended and enjoyed the racing, entertainment and hospitality of the public shore side festival. The Race starts October 22, 2017 from Alicante, Spain and will make its only North American stop in Newport, RI, May 8-20, 2018.
LIVE STREAMING:
The event will be live streamed for those who can’t make the event. Check the home page at sailnewport.org on Monday for information.
The Volvo Ocean Race
The Volvo Ocean Race is the ultimate ocean marathon, pitting sport’s best sailors against each other across the world’s toughest oceans.  The legendary race that began in 1973 will start from Alicante, Spain in October 2017 and finish in The Hague, Netherlands in June 2018.  Featuring almost three times as much Southern Ocean sailing as in the previous edition, the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18 will be contested over the longest distance in the race’s history at around 45,000 nautical miles, crossing four oceans and taking in 12 major cities on six continents.
The Volvo Ocean Race has been the global sponsorship flagship of Volvo Group and Volvo Car Group since taking ownership of the race in 1999.  The Volvo Ocean Race is operated as a non-profit organization.
ABOUT THE VOLVO OCEAN RACE NEWPORT STOPOVER
The only North American Stopover of the Volvo Ocean Race will be hosted by Sail Newport, Rhode Island’s Public Sailing Center, the State of Rhode Island Dept. of Environmental Management (DEM), Discover Newport, and the City of Newport.  This two-week stopover celebration and festival will be open to the public for free and will include a Race Village (opens May 8, 2018) with entertainment, a marine Exploration Zone (opens May 12, 2018), kids activities, a food court, team compounds, sponsor pavilions and a theater.  On-the-water activities and sailing events are scheduled for each day such as Try Sailing for families, M32 and other sailboat racing, up-close viewing of the race boats at dock and racing during the Pro-Am Race, the In-Port Races, and the boat parade and Leg Start to Cardiff, Wales (May 20, 2018)  All sailing will take place within yards of the Race Village on the shoreline at Fort Adams State Park.

 

May 14, 2015. Volvo Ocean Race Practice Race in Newport. ( Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez /Volvo Ocean Race )

May 14, 2015. Volvo Ocean Race Practice Race in Newport. ( Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez /Volvo Ocean Race )

Volvo Ocean Race COO Tom Touber today joined Sail Newport’s Brad Read and Governor Gina Raimondo, to announce that the Race will be heading back to the Ocean State for the 2017-18 edition
–       Rhode Island town to host race for a second time in 2018
–       Governor Raimondo heralds Newport’s achievement
–       More port announcements to come in the New Year

NEWPORT, Rhode Island, October 30 – Newport, Rhode Island, will once again host the North American stopover for the 13th edition of the Volvo Ocean Race in 2017-18 following the success of the sailing-mad coastal town’s hosting of the world’s leading offshore event in May.

“We’re delighted to be able to confirm that Newport will be staging a second consecutive stopover in 2018,” said Race COO, Tom Touber, at Friday’s (October 30) official announcement.

Volvo Ocean Race COO, Tom Touber ( Photo by Cory Silken )

Volvo Ocean Race COO, Tom Touber ( Photo by Cory Silken )

“Everything worked brilliantly in Newport in May thanks to the great work of Brad Read and his team plus the backing of the Governor, legislative leaders and State of Rhode Island agencies, and we were delighted with the large amount of spectators from our major fan base in the U.S. and elsewhere, who supported the stopover.

“Moreover, the Newport stopover was greatly valued by our stakeholders, who very much enjoyed visiting the area for its history, culture and, of course, the commercial opportunities it provided.”

The news that Newport will again be hosting the event means that seven ports for the next edition of the 42-year-old race are already known.

The east coast port joins Alicante (Spain), Cape Town (South Africa), Auckland (New Zealand), Cardiff (United Kingdom), Lisbon (Portugal) and Gothenburg (Sweden) on the list of confirmed stopovers for the 2017-18 edition.

“The route is already shaping up very nicely, although we have several more key port announcements to come, probably early in the New Year,” added Touber.

Rhode Island Governor, Gina M. Raimondo, who joined Volvo Ocean Race officials and Stopover Director Brad Read in Friday’s announcement ceremony at the State Room in the State capital, Providence, said:

“Rhode Island looks forward to welcoming back the Volvo Ocean Race in 2018, and we’re honoured to be among this list of world-class port destinations.”

She added: “This year’s event was a great success, drawing more than 130,000 fans from across the U.S. and abroad. We look forward to once again showcasing Rhode Island as a great place to visit – and do business.”

Brad Read, who heads Sail Newport, which masterminded the stopover this year, was delighted to have the chance to repeat – and improve on – the success of their inaugural hosting of the round-the-world marathon.

“Sail Newport, the Department of Environmental Management, and State Leadership, together with all of our outstanding partners, organised and hosted the most successful North American stopover in Volvo Ocean Race history,” he said.

“We did this as a non-profit organization combined with a whole lot of community heart and passion because we knew the event would be a remarkable success.”

He continued: “I believe strongly that tourists, fans, sponsors and media will travel from all over the world to Rhode Island to be part of the next Newport stopover.

“Everyone wants the Race back here. The State, the marine, business, education communities, and fans, will follow the Race until it arrives back at Castle Hill in 2018.”

The precise dates of the fleet’s visit in 2018 are not yet known but will be announced when the full route is unveiled early next year.

May 17, 2015. Leg 7 Start in Newport; Crowds gather to watch the teams race in port before heading out towards Lisbon. (Photo by Marc Bow / Volvo Ocean Race )

May 17, 2015. Leg 7 Start in Newport; Crowds gather to watch the teams race in port before heading out towards Lisbon. (Photo by Marc Bow / Volvo Ocean Race )

 

SSV Oliver Hazard Perry will arrive at Fort Adams on Saturday, May 2nd and will be open for public tours the following Saturday through Tuesday. (left: Credit George Bekris, right: credit Onne van der Wal/OHPRI)

SSV Oliver Hazard Perry will arrive at Fort Adams on Saturday, May 2nd and will be open for public tours the following Saturday through Tuesday. (left: Credit George Bekris, right: credit Onne van der Wal/OHPRI)

 

WHAT:     SSV Oliver Hazard Perry Public Showing and Tours

WHEN:     Public Showing May 5th  (afternoon) – May 12th

Public Tours:

Saturday, May 9th – Mon, May 11th (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.)

Tues, May 12th (9 a.m. – 3 p.m.)

WHERE:  Fort Adams State Park

SSV Oliver Hazard Perry will arrive at Fort Adams on Saturday, May 2nd and will be open for public tours the following Saturday through Tuesday. (left: Credit George Bekris, right: credit Onne van der Wal/OHPRI)

Sailing School Vessel (SSV) Oliver Hazard Perry will make the first-ever visit to her permanent berth at Fort Adams State Park in Newport. She is the first ocean-going full-rigged ship built in America in over a century, and she sails as the Ocean State’s Official Sailing Education Vessel.

The impressive silhouette of SSV Oliver Hazard Perry includes a towering rig, the tallest part of which reaches 13 ½ stories high; a total of 19 spars that have been turned from massive Douglas fir trees on the largest spar lathe in North America; seven miles of rope and wire that have been made integral to the ship’s operation by tradesmen trained in both modern and traditional rigging techniques; and 20 sails, both square and fore-and-aft that total 14,000 square feet.

As a Sailing School Vessel, the Tall Ship will carry not passengers but students of all ages participating in academic and experiential learning programs aboard while engaging in all aspects of shipboard life.

Oliver Hazard Perry (Photo by George Bekris)

Oliver Hazard Perry (Photo by George Bekris)

 

 

Oliver Hazard Perry (Photo by George Bekris)

Oliver Hazard Perry (Photo by George Bekris)

 High School Semester-at-Sea Offered for Winter/Spring 2016

 NEWPORT, RI (April 28, 2015) – A limited number of spaces are available for SSV Oliver Hazard Perry’s High School Semester-at-Sea program scheduled for the Winter and Spring of 2016. This voyage will be conducted by Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island (OHPRI) in partnership with Ocean Classroom, the non-profit organization based in Portland, Maine that has a 20-year tradition of offering trans-formative voyages under sail. Participating students can receive full academic credit for this new 14-week experiential learning program that starts in St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands on February 3rd, 2016 and concludes on May 14th in Portland.

Oliver Hazard Perry (Photo by George Bekris)

Oliver Hazard Perry (Photo by George Bekris)

SSV Oliver Hazard Perry will be the platform for a High School Semester-at-Sea program presented by Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island in partnership with Ocean Classroom over Winter/Spring 2016.

While students are aboard the Perry they will participate in all aspects of the ship’s operations as well as follow a specially tailored academic curriculum. Courses taught include marine science, maritime literature, maritime history, applied mathematics and navigation (including some trigonometry), and seamanship skills.

SSV Oliver Hazard Perry is uniquely outfitted for teaching invaluable lessons both above decks and below. Equipped with classroom space, a well-stocked library and full science laboratory, the ship allows faculty and students to learn with the same equipment and facilities as they would use in modern land-based schools.

Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island and Ocean Classroom have partnered to offer a High School Semester-at-Sea program over Winter/Spring 2016.

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Learning the ropes at sea ( Onne van der Wal/OHPRI)

During the program, the ship will make stops at a number of islands and ports, including St. Eustatius; Bequia; Trinidad; Puerto Rico; Cumberland Island, Georgia; Charleston, S.C.; Norfolk, Virginia; New York City; Newport, R.I.; and Bar Harbor, Maine. (Itineraries are subject to change.) On adventures ashore, students will explore local historical sites, natural attractions and museums. There are tentative plans for a service project at Cumberland Island and a beach cookout and evening kayak expedition to study bioluminescence in Vieques (Puerto Rico). In New York, plans are for students to visit the Museum of Natural History, South Street Seaport and the Fulton Fish Market.

Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island and Ocean Classroom have partnered to offer a High School Semester-at-Sea program over Winter/Spring 2016.

Learning the ropes at sea (Photo by  Ocean Classroom)

Learning the ropes at sea (Photo by Ocean Classroom)

SSV Oliver Hazard Perry is the nation’s newest and largest sail training and educational vessel. At 200 feet in length, her 130-foot-tall rig consists of three masts and 20 sails. Below decks, she offers accommodations for 49 people on ocean voyages, a climate-controlled environment, a modern galley, and a full array of electronic navigation and communication gear. As a new vessel, she has been built under the supervision of the U.S. Coast Guard and the American Bureau of Shipping to ensure that she meets, if not exceeds, all safety regulations for worldwide operations.

To learn more about this program and how to apply for one of the limited spaces available, contact OHPRI Executive Director Jess Wurzbacher at 401-841-0080, info@ohpri.org or Ocean Classroom’s Tara Treichel at +1 207-370-2287, admissions@oceanclassroom.org. Apply online at www.oceanclassroom.org

Follow OHPRI on Facebook and Twitter for current news and developments.

Learning the ropes at sea (Photo by  Ocean Classroom)

Learning the ropes at sea (Photo by Ocean Classroom)

 

Volvo Ocean Race Fleet round mark before heading out of Cape Town starting Leg 2  (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

Volvo Ocean Race Fleet round mark before heading out of Cape Town starting Leg 2 (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

– Gusts of up to 35 knots send fleet off to flyer

– Follow the race all the way on our app

CAPE TOWN, South Africa, November 19 – Skippers of the seven boats in the Volvo Ocean Race fleet, which set out for the 6,125 nautical mile (nm) Leg 2 from Cape Town to Abu Dhabi on Wednesday, left with warnings of possible cyclone activity and tropical storms ringing in their ears.

Race organisers took late measures to keep the 66 sailors away from the very worst of the weather on the Indian Ocean with a new exclusion zone leading to the Seychelles.

There were already zones in place to avoid icebergs in the Southern Ocean and the more unlikely menace of pirate attack further down the route on the east coast of the Indian Ocean.

The latter zone was being kept secret from the public to avoid the possibility of the fleet being intercepted.

From the very start on Wednesday (1800 local/1600 UTC), the sailors were given a taste of things to come with gusts of up to 35 knots kicking up a procession of white-capped waves.

It was a question of ‘don’t break your boat’ as most opted for conservative sail choices, while they wrestled to keep them under control and intact.

For the second leg start in a row, Team Brunel led the fleet out of port after wrestling the lead, first from MAPFRE (Iker Martínez/ESP), and then Team SCA (Sam Davies/GBR) who were well in the hunt.

Brunel and Mapfre leave Cape Town, South Africa at start of Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 (Photo © Chris Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race)

Brunel and Mapfre leave Cape Town, South Africa at start of Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 (Photo © Chris Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race)

 

The fleet will continue to sail in these gale-force conditions, which Team Alvimedica skipper Charlie Enright (USA) described before the start as ‘heinous’.

“I think we’re all going to have to be pretty conservative,” he told the skippers’ press conference, just over 24 hours earlier. “This could be the worst sea state these boats have ever seen.”

Favourites for the leg are Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing (Ian Walker/GBR), who have barely made a false move since setting out from Alicante on October 11.

They followed their 12-minute win over Dongfeng Race Team in Leg 1 on November 5, by securing victory on Saturday in the Cape Town in-port race.

When asked if there were such a thing as ‘home advantage’ in sailing, Walker, 44, was determined to keep his crew’s feet on the ground – as well as his own.

“First we have to get there,” he smiled. “I’ll be happy just to get within range and then arrive in Abu Dhabi. There’s a fantastic welcome for everybody in store once we get there, that’s for sure.”

Team Vestas Wind surprised onlookers when a choir on board their support boat burst into song just prior to the start. Their message was loud and clear: ‘There’s an even more important race we must win – to save the environment’.

Leg 2 is expected to take between 22 to 28 days to complete, depending on conditions. The boats will remain in Abu Dhabi over Christmas and the New Year before setting sail again on January 3 for Sanya, China.

 

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing leaving Cape Town, South Africa at start of Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 (Photo © Chris Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race)

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing leaving Cape Town, South Africa at start of Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 (Photo © Chris Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race)

 

 

 

 

Abu Dhabi Racing Team, skippered by Ian Walker, win the In-Port acing Series in Cape Town, South Africa racking up more points (Photo © Charlie Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race

Abu Dhabi Racing Team, skippered by Ian Walker, win the In-Port acing Series in Cape Town, South Africa racking up more points (Photo © Charlie Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race

In-Port CAPE TOWN total
Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing 1 3
Team Brunel 2 6
Team Alvimedica 6 7
Team SCA 3 9
Dongfeng Race Team 4 9
MAPFRE 7 10
Team Vestas Wind 5 12

* Did Not Finish | ** Retired | *** Disqualified | **** Did Not Start

– Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing top of In-Port series

– Follow the race all the way on our app

CAPE TOWN, South Africa, November 15 – Ian Walker (GBR) and his Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing crew became the confirmed kings of Cape Town on Saturday, clinching the in-port race less than a week after arriving here as Leg 1 winners.

The victory, by just over a minute, leaves them on top of the In-port Race Series too, and bursting with confidence for Leg 2 which starts on Wednesday (November 19).

Only in the sprint to the finish line from the final mark on the eight-mile course on Saturday, did Walker’s men look under threat with Team Brunel (Bouwe Bekking/NED) and Team SCA (Sam Davies/GBR) breathing down their necks.

The fleet was split from the start in challenging conditions in Table Bay, under the famous Table Mountain, with winds jumping dramatically between 12 and 20 knots and rain clouds threatening throughout.

Walker’s team from the Emirates have already shown that they can make the right decisions under the toughest of pressure, by edging out Dongfeng Race Team (Charles Caudrelier/FRA) by just 12 minutes in a thrilling Leg 1 climax last week after 25 days of sailing from Alicante to Cape Town.

November 15, 2014. The fleet during the  In-Port race in Cape Town. (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

November 15, 2014. The fleet during November 15, 2014. The fleet at the start of the In-Port race in Cape Town. (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

After some 20 minutes of racing on Saturday, they looked to have victory in the bag, especially after one of their rivals for the in-port series prize, Team Alvimedica (Charlie Enright/USA), suffered a tear in their headsail.

The battle for second place soon grabbed the attention of most with Team SCA and Team Brunel in a thrilling showdown after the Dutch found a burst of pressure midway round.

Bekking had earlier told a press conference that the in-port series was not a big priority for him.

But he and his crew were plainly giving it 100 percent as they scrambled with Team SCA for the second rung of the poldium.

A problem with a gennaker failing to unfurl cleanly finally scuppered the efforts of the women’s crew to keep Bekking and co at bay and Team Brunel made one final effort to catch Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing.

Once again, Walker was ready for the challenge and by the finish line had a winning margin of a couple of hundred metres from Team Brunel with Team SCA in third.

Results Cape town In-Port Race:
1. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing – 15:06:57 -1pt
2. Team Brunel (NED) 15:08:00 – 2pts
3. Team SCA (SWE) 15:09:04 – 3pts
4. Dongfeng Race Team (CHN) 15:09:22 – 4pts
5. Team Vestas Wind (DEN) 15:11:25 – 5pts
6. Team Alvimedica (USA/TUR) 15:16:14 – 6pts
7. MAPFRE (ESP) 15:18:32 – 7pts

November 15, 2014. The fleet at the start of the In-Port race in Cape Town. (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

November 15, 2014. The fleet at the start of the In-Port race in Cape Town. (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

 

November 5, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing celebrate on stage after crossing the finish line in Cape Town as the winners of Leg 1. (Photo © Ian Roman/Volvo OCean Race)

November 5, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing celebrate on stage after crossing the finish line in Cape Town as the winners of Leg 1. (Photo © Ian Roman/Volvo OCean Race)

Leg 1 – Alicante to Cape Town

26 days at sea.


Times

In order of finish: Finish date Finish Time Elapsed Time
Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing 11/05/14  15:10:44 UTC  25d 3h 10m 44s
Dongfeng Race Team 11/05/14  15:22:48 UTC  25d 3h 22m 48s
Team Brunel  11/05/14  19:33:25 UTC  25d 7h 33m 25s
Team Vestas Wind  11/06/14  12:48:47 UTC  26d 00h 48m 47s
Team Alvimedica  11/07/14  01:07:38 UTC 26d 13h 07m 38s
Team SCA  11/07/14  11:37:49 UTC  26d 23h 37m 49s
MAPFRE   11/07/14  12:47:32 UTC  27d 00h 47m 32s

Stats

In order of finish: Sailed
distance (nm)
Max 24hr
distance (nm)
Max 1hr avg
speed (Knots)
Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing 8772,444 539,269 26,5
Dongfeng Race Team 8363,906 541,655 24,5
Team Brunel 8788,946 533,5 26,5
Team Vestas Wind 8531,5 522,7 23,8
Team Alvimedica  8405,5 489,5  27,9
Team SCA  8499,9  501,6  23,8
 MAPFRE  8525,9  477,5  21,7
November 05, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing crosses the finish line winning Leg 1 from Alicante to Cape Town after 25 days of sailing.  (Photo copyright Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

November 05, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing crosses the finish line winning Leg 1 from Alicante to Cape Town after 25 days of sailing. (Photo copyright Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race )

Leg 1
DTL

(NM)

GAIN/LOSS

(NM)

DTF

(NM)

Speed

(kt)

ADOR
ADOR FIN – 025d 03h 10m 44s
DFRT
DFRT FIN – 025d 03h 22m 48s
TBRU
TBRU 0 61 45.9 15
VEST
VEST 172.9 52 218.7 7
ALVI
ALVI 306 59 351.8 15
MAPF
MAPF 395 62 440.9 20
SCA1
SCA1 424.4 60 470.2 19

–  Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing win by just 12 minutes

– Dongfeng Race Team chase Azzam to the finish

– Follow the race all the way on our app 

ALICANTE, Spain, Nov 5 – Ian Walker (GBR) and his Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing crew have barely snatched a wink of sleep for nearly 48 hours, but they will surely be celebrating deep into the night after an epic first leg victory in the Volvo Ocean Race on Wednesday.

November 5, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing celebrate after crossing the finish line in Cape Town as the winners of  Leg 1 (Photo copyright Charlie Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race)

November 5, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing celebrate after crossing the finish line in Cape Town as the winners of Leg 1 (Photo © Charlie Shoemaker/Volvo Ocean Race)

There have been many close finishes in the 41-year history of the event, but few will have been quite so tense for the victors, who have been feeling the hot breath of Dongfeng Race Team (Charles Caudrelier/FRA) down their necks for the best part of a week in the 6,487-nautical mile (nm) stage.

Even with the finish under Table Mountain in Cape Town in sight 2nm away, Walker could not relax, with wind in perilously short supply and the Chinese boat able to close again before Azzam finally claimed the hardest fought of victories.

The crossed the line at 1510 UTC, just 12 minutes before Dongfeng, after 25 days, three hours and 10 minutes of sailing.

The win is a personal triumph for 44-year-old Walker. The Briton was forced to motor miserably back into Alicante on the first night of the opening leg in 2011-12 after a Mediterranean storm dismasted his boat.

This time, he and the crew have barely made an error since setting out with the rest of the fleet on October 11 from Alicante, and their Volvo Ocean 65 has withstood everything that the Med and the Atlantic could throw at them.

But they still could not shake off Caudrelier’s crew, who tried all manner of manoeuvres, some under the cover of darkness, to get the better of the front-runners.

Walker, red-eyed after sleep deprivation for so long, was finally able to celebrate surely one of the sweetest wins of a career, which also includes two Olympic silver medals.

November 05, 2014. Skipper Ian Walker, Adil Khalid and Luke Parkinson on stage for the prize giving. Abu Dhabi was first of Leg 1 from Alicante to Cape Town.  ( Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

November 05, 2014. Skipper Ian Walker, Adil Khalid and Luke Parkinson on stage for the prize giving. Abu Dhabi was first of Leg 1 from Alicante to Cape Town. (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

“It’s quite emotional actually,” Walker told Race HQ, minutes after crossing the line.

“I didn’t think I would be – but that last couple of hours, they threw everything at us,” he smiled, “We’ve had people ride on our heels for the last 10 days or so. I must congratulate Dongfeng, an absolutely fantastic performance.”

Ian Walker greets Charles Caudrelier as Team Dongfeng docks and takes 2nd place just minutes after Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing grabs first place in Leg 1 (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

Ian Walker greets Charles Caudrelier as Team Dongfeng docks and takes 2nd place just minutes after Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing grabs first place in Leg 1 (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

In contrast, Caudrelier looked like he had thoroughly enjoyed every minute of the chase and the opportunity to prove a point to those who doubted that his crew, that included two Chinese rookies, could seriously compete at the front of the fleet.

Dongfeng Race Team’s second place was all the more remarkable since twice their progress was slowed through damage to the boat; first through a smashed rudder and then through a shattered padeye, which caused a domino-effect of damage including a broken wheel.

Charles Caudrelier and Team Dongfeng  takes 2nd place just minutes after Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing grabs first place in Leg 1 (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

Charles Caudrelier and Team Dongfeng takes 2nd place just minutes after Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing grabs first place in Leg 1 (Photo © Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

Repeatedly over the past week, they have nibbled away at Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing’s lead, closing to within three nm shortly after daybreak on Wednesday.

But Walker and his team had sailed too well for too long to give victory away after such a struggle, and the crowd packing Cape Town’s famous V&A Waterfront gave them a reception they surely will never forget.

1st Place finish podium with Abu Dhabi Ocean  Racing Team led by Ian Walker (Photo by Ian Roman/Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing)

1st Place finish podium with Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing Team led by Ian Walker (Photo by Ian Roman/Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing)

For the rest of the fleet, it’s now a battle for the minor places and equally hard-won points. Team Brunel (Bouwe Bekking/NED) should take third spot later on Wednesday with Team Vestas Wind (Chris Nicholson/AUS) looking good for fourth.

Team Alvimedica (Charlie Enright/USA) are expected to be too far ahead to be caught in fifth, but MAPFRE (Iker Martínez/ESP) and Team SCA (Sam Davies/GBR) could yet have a big tussle for sixth and seventh spots before their expected arrival in Cape Town on Friday.

November 05, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing leads at the end of Leg 1 on the approach of Cape Town finish line.  (Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)

November 05, 2014. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing leads at the end of Leg 1 on the approach of Cape Town finish line. (Photo by Ainhoa Sanchez/Volvo Ocean Race)