The PHRF Class start at the 2013 Ida Lewis Distance Race  (Photo by Meghan Sepe)

The PHRF Class start at the 2013 Ida Lewis Distance Race (Photo by Meghan Sepe)

 

A “virtual mark” adds an intriguing new twist to the 10th Annual Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR), which starts this Friday (August 15). Starting at 12:30 p.m. off Fort Adams in Newport, R.I., the popular overnighter takes its fleet of PHRF, IRC, One-Design, Doublehanded and Multihull boats on one of four courses – between 104nm and 177nm – that trace the New England coastline.

“This is the first time that we have used the concept of a ‘virtual mark’ at the Ida Lewis Distance Race,” said ILDR Race Chairman Simon Davidson, adding that the mark is similar to a traditional mark, as defined in the rules of sailing, except rather than being a physical object, it’s a position defined by latitude and longitude coordinates.

“Originally, this concept was born out of necessity, due to the Coast Guard’s removal of various traditional marks that we’ve used in the past. However, making this change actually enhances the race committee’s ability to set an optimal distance course. If this experience proves successful, we expect to see it used for a lot of other events.”

This year, the mark will be located at longitude 41:06.00 north and latitude 071:23.34 west.

“This seems to be an emerging trend,” said Ed Cesare (Norwalk, Conn.), who is returning this summer to defend his 2013 win on Class 40 Pleiad Racing in the Doublehanded Division. “I know the RORC uses virtual marks and have been doing so for some time. Certainly the technology is there, so if it works for the race course, then let’s do it.”

Cesare has been racing in the Ida Lewis Distance Race since its inception in 2004. “I competed in this event on a variety of different boats, and what I love about it is that the organizers are constantly trying to modify the format to make it better for a variety of different teams. It also starts and finishes in Newport, making it a fun weekend for all members of the family.”

Youth Challenge Entries 2013 photo by Meghan Sepe

Youth Challenge Entries 2013 (Photo by Meghan Sepe)

To that point, the Ida Lewis Distance Race welcomes the next generation of sailors to try offshore racing on for size with its Youth and Collegiate Challenges. To qualify for the Youth Challenge, more than 40% of the crew must have reached their 14th birthday but not turned 20 prior to August 15. To qualify for the Collegiate Challenge, more than 40% of the crew must not have reached the age of 26 prior to August 15. For both challenges, teams are encouraged to register under the burgee of a college sailing program or a US SAILING yacht club or community sailing program.

TRACK THE RACERS HERE

Video and Photo Contests
The Ripple Effect Short Video Contest has been introduced to attract and engage the youth sailors (between 14 and 20 years of age) competing in the Ida Lewis Distance Race. The contest was originally developed by Joe Cooper and Manuka SEM for the Atlantic Cup this past May. Participants (working either individually or as a team) are asked to answer the question “What do you like most about offshore/overnight sailing?” through a video essay or documentary no longer than five minutes in length.

The Ida Lewis Distance Race Photo Challenge invites all sailors competing in this summer’s event to submit photos to the event Facebook Page (with hashtag #ILDR) that capture their experience at the race. Prizes for both contests will be announced at a later date.

To download contest guidelines and registration form, visit http://bit.ly/1oIOWFb

Sponsors
Starting Line sponsors for the 2014 Ida Lewis Distance Race include the City of Newport, Helly Hansen, New England Boatworks, Marsh, Newport Shipyard and North Sails; Contributing Sponsors are DYT Yacht Transport, Goslings Rum, Rig Pro Southern Spars, Stella Artois, Flint Audio Video, Mac Designs, Sea Gear Uniforms, Toni Mills Graphic Design and Z Block.

The Ida Lewis Distance Race is a qualifier for the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); the Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

For more information or to register, visit http://www.ildistancerace.org or contact Race Chair Simon Davidson, RaceChairman@ILDistanceRace.org.

Follow the race on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube

 

IRC Class Start at 2013 Ida Lewis Distance (Photo by Meghan Sepe)

IRC Class Start at 2013 Ida Lewis Distance (Photo by Meghan Sepe)

IDA LEWIS DISTANCE RACE ENTRIES FOR 2014
Sail Number Yacht Name Owner’s Name Home Port Yacht Type Length
1. USA 41241 And She Was Tim Keyworth Deep River , CT , USA Nelson Marek 45 45.61
2. USA 60510 Ariel Bob Anderson Seekonk, MA, USA J 46 46 ft
3. USA 14111 Aurora Andrew Kallfelz Jamestown, RI, USA Tartan41 12.37m
4. USA 4224 Barleycorn Brendan Brownyard Bay Shore, NY, USA Swan 42 42.5
5. USA 190 Bazinga! Dave Lussier Exeter, RI, USA F-31 31
6. USA 4243 Blazer Christopher Culver Stamford, CT, USA Swan 42 42.5
7. USA 42258 Breakaway Paul Grimes Portsmouth, RI, USA J 35 35.5
8. GBR 7190 BUFFALO – Collegiate Richard Fontaine Buzzards Bay, MA, USA DK 46 46.3
9. USA 42565 Covenant-Collegiate Chris Oliver – Univ. of Michigan Norwalk, CT, USA J 40 40
10. USA 43777 Crazy Horse – Collegiate Kevin McLaughlin – Duquesne Univ. Fairhaven, MA, USA Sloop 50
11. USA 54 DRAGON Michael Hennessy New York, NY, USA Class 40 40
12. USA 42700 Duck Soup Bill Clavin Warwick, RI, USA C&C 37 R/XL 39’6
13. USA 60511 Eagles Dare Mike Piper Marblehead, MA, USA J 111 36
14. USA 50400 Entropy Paul Hamilton / Patti Young Jamestown, RI, USA Tripp 41 41.0
15. USA 52162 EXILE Brendan Kelley Newport, RI, USA J 133 43
16. USA 88 Flight Risk John R Sampson Rumson, NJ, USA Corsair 31 Trimaran 31
17. 27 Flying Fish Steven Parks Middletown, RI, USA F27 27
18. USA 106 GryphonSolo2 Joe Harris S. Hamilton, MA, USA Class 40 40
19. GBR 8858R Jackknife 11 Andrew Hall Southport, Merseyside, GBR C&C Redline 41 41
20. USA 52056 KING DADDY Devin McGranahan Sewickley, PA, USA Swan 56 56
21. GBR 711 Maximizer Jose Diego-Arozamena New York, NY, USA Farr 73 73
22. USA 10 Milk and Honey III Mchael Divon New York, NY, USA Corsair C37 37
23. USA 60554 Moonshot Aldo Roldan Princeton, NJ, USA Amel Ketch 53
24. USA 52814 North Sails Youth Challenge Joe Cooper Middletown, RI, USA Class 40 40
25. USA 2001 Oakcliff Racing – Youth Entry Oakcliff Sailing Oyster Bay, NY, USA Farr 47 47
26. USA 711 Odyssey – Youth Entry Alfred Van Liew Middletown, RI, USA J 111 36.5
27. USA 12282 Orion Paul Milo Leesburg, VA, USA J 122 40
28. USA 60426 Oronoco Adrian Ravenscroft Cohasset, MA, USA Sabre 426 42
29. USA 39 Pleiad Racing Edward Cesare Norwalk, CT, USA Class 40 40
30. USA 301 Samba Tristan Mouligne Boston, MA, USA Quest 30 30
31. USA 52756 Sarah Greg Manning Warwick, RI, USA X-41 41
32. USA 61200 Secondhand Lions – Youth Challenge Robert Kits van Heyningen Portsmouth, RI, USA J 120 40
33. USA 40808 SELKIE David Brown Middletown, RI, USA McCurdy&Rhodes 38 38
34. USA 52643 Settler Thomas Rich Portsmouth, RI, USA NEB Tripp 43 43
35. USA 57 Skedaddle Andrew Houlding Hamden, CT, USA Corsair 28R 28
36. USA 56 Spirit EC Helme Newport, RI, USA J 92S 30
37. USA 95 SPOOKIE Steve & Heidi Benjamin Norwalk, CT, USA Carkeek HP 40 40.0
38. USA 31 Team McMichael Youth Challenge Richard Fleig Portsmouth, RI, USA J 88 29
39. USA 4212 The Cat Came Back Lincoln Mossop Providence, RI, USA Swan 42 42
40. USA 52985 Three Little Birds Kevin Baxley Brooklyn, NY, USA Trimaran 11m
41. USA 128 Toothface2 Michael Dreese West Newton, MA, USA Class 40 – Akilaria RC3 40
42. USA 203 URSA Brooke Mastrorio Lakeville, MA, USA J 109 35
43. USA 93499 Valkyrie Drew Chapman New York, NY, USA Beneteau First 44.7 44
44. USA 51322 Vamoose Bob Manchester Barrington, RI, USA J 120 40.0
45. USA 7145 Vortices Chris Saxton Plymouth, MI, USA J 145 48
46. USA 52821 White Rhino Todd Stuart Newport, RI, USA Swan 56 56

Shockwave and Bella Mente (Photo by George Bekris)

Shockwave and Bella Mente (Photo by George Bekris)

By Talbot Wilson

Three boats had finished the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race by late Monday afternoon

— Shockwave, Bella Mente, Caol Ila R

George Sakellaris’ big white Richel/Pugh mini-maxi Shockwave crossed the finish line off Bermuda’s St. David’s Lighthouse Monday morning at 5:34 race time EDT (6:34AM local time). Her elapsed time was 63:04:11. Bella Mente, Hap Fauth’s 72 foot Judel/Vrolijk mini-maxi, followed by seven minutes with her time at 63:11:25. The two had battled head to head within sight of each almost continuously for over 635 miles.

Shockwave heading for a dawn finish off St David's Lighthouse. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

Shockwave heading for a dawn finish off St David’s Lighthouse. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

Caol Ila R, Alex Schaerer’s 68 foot Mills IRC racer, crossed third at 8:33 local time, three hours behind Shockwave at 66:03:52.

Based on preliminary ORR results, Shockwave stands first on corrected time in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division, Bella Mente is second and Caol Ila R is third.

The next boat on the course, the US Naval Academy TP52 Constellation, is expected to finish more than 16 hours after the leader on Monday night. The remainder of the fleet is caught in the fickle winds of a frontal zone, waiting for the system to drift east-southeast and weaken. The picture is not pretty for boats still on the course. Light conditions will prevail through Wednesday and maybe longer.

Robbie Doyle sailed his 12th Newport Bermuda Race as the “stratitician” on board George Sakellaris’ Shockwave.

Doyle said, “Different guys called different things for the general strategy. The navigator made a lot of big calls. We had to hunt to find the (Gulf) Stream… we never found the 4 knot real road to Bermuda. It had broken up before we got there. Forecasters had predicted it might, but they suggested we might get there before it would start to dismember. The Stream was really breaking up pretty quick.”

“We got a knot and a half out of it.” He continued, “The stream came around (motioning to indicate a southwest to northeast direction to southeast direction) and what happened is that this part (flow) stopped and decided it was going to reconnect itself eventually and just become a smooth stream. We got through it.”

When asked about the cold core eddy predicted below the flow, Doyle said, “We caught that eddy, but it was only a knot and a half of current; still nice because we had it for 40 nautical miles. It wasn’t the three knots we had fought to get to that point for.“

Congratulations to George Sakellaris and the team aboard Shockwave for winning line honors in this year’s race. The win adds to Shockwave’s growing list of recent victories, highlighted by their division win in the 2012 Newport-Bermuda Race, the 2013 Montego Bay, and the 2014 RORC Caribbean 600 Race. Originally launched in 2008 as Alpha Romero 3, Shockwave continues her winning ways.

George Sakellaris, owner of the first to finish yacht Shockwave celebrates with Gosling's Dark 'n Stormy drink with his crew on arrival at the Royal Bermuda YC dock. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

George Sakellaris, owner of the first to finish yacht Shockwave celebrates with Gosling’s Dark ‘n Stormy drink with his crew on arrival at the Royal Bermuda YC dock. Photo Barry Pickthall/PPL

Commander’s Weather
1) Frontal zone is located from 35/65w to 33n/70w to Savannah early this morning
a) This front will continue to drift ESE and weaken

2) An expanding area of light winds will develop along and N and S of the frontal zone
a) The shower and squall activity will be diminishing this morning and will become at most isolated this afternoon and tonight
b) The nice SW winds in Bermuda will become much lighter late today and tonight

3) By Tue morning, the frontal zone will be located from 35n/60 30w to 33n/65w to a weak low near 32-33n/74w
a) Light NE-E winds north of the front and very light SW-W winds south of the front
b) Shower/squall activity will be at most isolated and possibly non-existent

4) Wed will see the light wind conditions continuing
a) The frontal zone will be drifting N with light SW and S winds also spreading slowly north during the day

For scratch sheets, crew lists, and other information about the boats, go to Race Documents & Rules.

Twenty-nine of the two Newport Bermuda Lighthouse Divisions’ entries are also sailing the 25th Onion Patch Series, a tough triathlon of offshore racing. These Onion Patch racers have just sailed the NYYC 160th Annual Regatta presented by Rolex in Newport and will form the core of the June 27nd RBYC Anniversary Regatta which now has 32 entries. The RBYC Anniversary Regatta is open to all IRC or ORR rated yachts over 25 feet in Bermuda. Anniversary Regatta entries close at noon on June 25th. Information is online at www.onionpatchseries.com and at www.rbyc.bm.

www.BermudaRace.com — carries Newport Bermuda Race rules, news, videos, photos, history, and expert advice. Race news is also posted on the Newport Bermuda Race 2014 Facebook page and on Twitter at @BdaRace.

HIRO MARU and the Class 1 St. David's Lighthouse Division Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

HIRO MARU and the Class 1 St. David’s Lighthouse Division Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

It Was a Little Messy, but the Bermuda Race Fleet has Started

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

Spirit of Bermuda Starts off the Race for 2014 (Photo By George Bekris)

By John Rousmaniere

If it was more fun for  spectators than the sailors, the reason was the sea breeze that inched toward the starting line until it finally dominated the northerly.Newport. RI, June 20, 2014, 7 PM.  Who would have thought that spinnakers would be flown at the starts of two Newport Bermuda Races in a row?  The race did not gain its well-known nickname, “The Thrash to the Onion Patch,” because it’s a downwind sleigh ride, like the Transpac.  The 2012 start was a fast run before a fresh northerly for every one of the 165 boats in every class.  This year was a little more complicated for the 164 starters. As the five divisions in 14 classes got going over a period of two and one-half hours, the first half of the fleet in seven starts got away in a leftover northerly breeze under spinnaker.   Not so the last seven.  Like a typical summer day on Long Island Sound, the mouth of Narragansett Bay was full of confusion.

Some of the Class 2 fleet St. David's Lighthouse Division Start 2014  (Photo by George Bekris)

Some of the Class 2 fleet St. David’s Lighthouse Division Start 2014 (Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

The afternoon’s winners appear to be the boats that started early, Classes 1, 2, and 3–the smaller and medium-size boats in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division.  With the light to moderate northerly on their stern, they tacked downwind to the buoy marking the outer reaches of Brenton Reef, and carried their chutes around the mark and onto the southeasterly course to Bermuda. When the southwester filled in like a light summer blanket, all they had to do was raise the jib, douse the spinnaker, and tack onto starboard, meanwhile holding the same course.

Newport_Bermuda_2014_george_bekris_June-20-2014_-1-001

One of the biggest of those winners may be Sinn Fein, the Cal 40 that’s always sailed well by Peter Rebovich, Sr., and his crew of family and friends from Raritan Yacht Club, in New Jersey.  The two-time winners of the St. David’s Lighthouse Division (in 2006 and 2008), they’ve been preoccupied by other concerns since the 2012 race: rebuilding their boat after she was nearly destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. Today they set the spinnaker promptly and effectively, found the right apparent wind angle, and pulled away. When last seen, Sinn Fein was on the far horizon, closehauled in the seabreeze and racing to Bermuda near the head of a clump of at least 50 other smaller boats. The Pantaenius tracker at 3 p.m. (about two hours after the Class 1 start) showed Sinn Fein slightly behind William Klein’s CC 40, Glim. We’ll know when we see later tracker readings (being sure to remember the 4-hour time delay) and a get a sense of the wind and wave conditions as the big fleet gets out into the Atlantic.

(Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

But at least everybody’s racing, and headed toward the Gulf Stream, where (the forecasters are telling us) they may find more to worry about than a shifty wind—such as squalls and big seas that could turn this race into a real thrash.The boats that started an hour or so later than Class 1 had any number of troubles as the seabreeze slowly pushed away the northerly. At one moment a Class 6 medium-size St. David’s Lighthouse boat with a red spinnaker up and pulling well on port tack was less than 25 yards abeam of another Class 6 boat with a green and yellow chute pulling well on starboard tack.  A few minutes later, the seabreeze reached the starting line in the mouth of Narragansett Bay just as Class 8 (large St. David’s boats) was making its final approach—some running in the dying northerly, others beating in the slowly building southerly.

(Photo by George Bekris)

(Photo by George Bekris)

 

For More Photos of the Newport Bermuda Race visit George Bekris Photography HERE 

 

 

– See more at bout the race at: http://bermudarace.com/little-messy-bermuda-race-fleet-started/#sthash.aMUaHBGw.dpuf