Superyacht Cup Palma 2015 Fleet (Photo  ©www.clairematches.com)

Superyacht Cup Palma 2015 Fleet (Photo ©www.clairematches.com)

Last night’s disco-themed dock party proved epic with the entire crew of the mighty Marie wearing orange wigs, pink sunglasses, glitter, gold and green satin suits; these clear winners went all out and so, not surprisingly, took the best-dressed-in-disco prize: VIP tickets to Pacha‘s after party and a bottle of bubbly to boot. Also team Tulip, colorfully kitted out in, well, ‘Tulips’, scored tickets, as well as own it on the dance floor for most of the night; think slick break-dance moves and a spirited ‘polonaise’. DJ Eazy Michael kept those feet on the dance floor which was followed by Bilonda’s soulful tunes. All in all last night’s fun was a perfect ending to a great day out on the water..

This morning saw the SYC race village bustling with the owners, sailors, friends and guests of the 21 spectacular superyachts charged to get the second day of sailing underway. And while some of the world’s most talented sailors were ardently discussing today’s tactics, the scene was set for today’s second day of racing.

Today’s menu served up a blazing sun, cloudless blue sky and the sea breeze getting it’s foot in the door a little earlier than yesterday. While on our first race day the breeze actually built more than expected, becoming moderate to fresh for much of the afternoon, today was predicted to be even beefier with 12-14 knots around midday and 14-18 in the afternoon.
The fleet headed out at 11 to make their way to the start line and racing got underway at 13.00. It was yesterday’s Class C winner Clan VIII who got off the start line first. The 45m Perini got off to a cracking start but unfortunately at 14.00, as the yachts were on their first run to Bahia 2,  the race got abandoned and the fleet had to return to the start line. Racing commenced again at 14.50 with the race committee opting for a shorter 18.7nm course. This time it was the ferociously green hulled,Vitters built Inouï and Nautor’s Highland Breeze who boasted best starts.

The first upwind Sech mark saw first timer, the 25m Maegan, round ahead of the fleet, pursued closely by new-boat-on-the-block Guardian Angel and the 26m Tulip. Maegan flew at full bore towards Bahia 2 but was chased hard by Kiboko Dos who managed to hunt her down and jibe around the mark first.
In the mean time in Class C both Highland Breeze and Clan VIII were not having a good day at the office. Highland Breeze stayed close to the shore which made her lose her 7th position and Clan VIII tacked later than her competitors who then started to reel her in one by one. The 28m Southern Wind Kiboko Dos however got seriously into gear and held her front running position rounding the fourth Illetas mark first, after which she gunned it towards the finish line crossing 3.27 minutes ahead of speed machine Open Season and 4.16 minutes before the stylish Swan 90 Odin.”For tomorrow we would like to continue doing a good job, in fact we did a good job yesterday. I think that we have to keep pushing and try our best. The team works together really well and we are very happy” commented a beaming Raimon Pascó, captain on board Kiboko Dos.

Today’s Class B winner, the 28m Southern Wind Kiboko Dos. © www.clairematches.com

Possibly the many sailors with local knowledge on board were the secret behind Kiboko Dos’ success today as she pulled out her impressive class win in Class B.

In Class A the Vitters built classic ketch Marie showed again she was on top form by winning her second bullet while newbie boat Maegan’s potent performance secured the team with a victory in Class C. On the new ORCsy rule Maegan’s navigator and CEO of Oyster David Tydeman said: ” The new superyacht rule is working. Oyster’s built 35 boats over 80 feet and with the previous handicap system it wasn’t worth coming to these events but it is now and we’re having a great time and I’m going to be encouraging Oysters to come regularly”. Regatta regular P2 took second after Marie. “The owner was super happy, he said we couldn’t have gotten any more out of the boat and the crew couldn’t have done a better job, so we felt we left nothing on the table and the results after day 2 sort of show that” smiled Captain Jonathan Kline.

A happy crew on board Kiboko Dos today. ©www.clairematches.com

As crew make a post-debrief lay line for the Regatta Bar sponsored by North Sails, the owners and their guests head for the unique St. Regis Mardavall. A stunning resort framed by the Tramuntana mountains, the luxurious marina of Puerto Portals and the sparkling blue Mediterranean Sea. With one group on the southwest coast of the island and the other in Superyacht Cup central we’re certain in both places all talk will feature the final day of sailing tomorrow, as everything will come down to the crunch in Saturday’s ultimate showdown.

Connect with us through Twitter #SYC15 and Facebook (The Superyacht Cup) for real time updates of all the action on and off the race course and/or follow the race live via Trac Trac.

2015 Entry List

Boat Size Design Shipyard
Blue Too 34m Ron Holland Alloy Yachts
Clan VIII 45m Ron Holland Perini Navi
Gaia 30.6m Spirit Yachts Spirit Yachts
Ganesha 46m Dubois Naval Architects Vitters Shipyard
Guardian Angel 26m Humphreys Yacht Design Oyster Yachts
Heartbeat 24m Hoek Yacht Design Claasen Shipyards
Highland Breeze 34m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Inoui 33m Briand Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Kiboko Dos 28m Reichel/Pugh Southern Wind Shipyard
Maegan 25m Humphreys Yacht Design Oyster Yachts
Maria Cattiva 40m Bruce King Royal Huisman
Marie 55m Hoek Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Odin 27.7m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Open Season 30.4m Judel/Vrolijk Wally Yachts
P2 38m Briand Yacht Design Perini Navi
Perseus ^3 60m Ron Holland Perini Navi
Saudade 45m Tripp Design Wally Yachts
Tilakkhana 24m Wally Yachts Wally Yachts
Tulip 26m Frers Yacht Design K&M Yacht Builders
Visione 45m Reichel/Pugh Baltic Yachts
Win Win 33m Javier Jaudenes Baltic Yachts
Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 (Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi)

.

This morning, dockside at The Bucket, it sounded rather funny for sailors to be talking about a “Not So Wiggley Course” with such reverence, but when the day was done and a second of three races had entered the 2014 regatta history books, it was quite clear why. Mademoiselle, Elegante and Gazelle classes took on the long version (27.1 nm) of the course, which started on the west side of St. Barths and wound its way around smaller islands and rocks to the north, while the Grande Dames sailed the shorter version (22 nm) in winds that were a few knots less than yesterday’s yet just as feisty. The “not so” in the course description was obviously tongue-in-cheek, as the 38 superyachts -ranging in size from 27.5m/88′ to 66.7m/216′-zigged and zagged more than the usual number of times while crews executed numerous sail changes as well as spinnaker hoists and takedowns, alternately winding their charges up to gain advantage, then dialing them down to safely share close quarters at rounding marks with their magnificently sized competitors.

Saint Barth Bucket 2014  Gustavia Port in Saint Barth Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi — at Saint Barth.

Saint Barth Bucket 2014
Gustavia Port in Saint Barth Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi — at Saint Barth.

Leading in the Elegantes class after finishing third today and combining that with a first from yesterday is the 54 m/180′ Vitters Ketch Marie, whose tactician Tony Rey, in describing his day, was beaming like a little kid who had just gotten away with something bigger than he expected.

“Anybody who says superyacht racing is champagne and cocktails and taking it easy hasn’t been to The Bucket,” he said. “It’s an absolutely spectacular exercise in teamwork to get these things around the track.”

Rey said he was pleased with Marie’s start and the first third of the leg but then encountered the classic situation of gaining so much that suddenly the team was in the mix with way more boats than he was comfortable with. “It was just mildly terrifying, which is a typical feeling in the afterguards at Bucket Regattas,” said Rey, who counts this as his fifth Bucket Regatta aboard Marie. “This means we’re having a good day.”

Adele: Ketch_Vitters_Hoek_54.6m Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race 1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi  at Saint Barth.

Adele: Ketch_Vitters_Hoek_54.6m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race 1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi at Saint Barth.

Marie’s crew had a few missteps with its maneuvers (including “breaking a spinnaker and putting it in the water”), but others in the class did, as well, and six boats were abreast coming around Roche Table.

“It was absolutely spectacular; there were 40 meters on each side,” Rey said, alluding to the International Superyacht Rule that requires boats to leave 40 meters in all directions between themselves and their competitors. “I didn’t need sun screen because there was shade from all the sails.”

 

Seahawk: Ketch_Perini Navi_Holland_58.6m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi  at Saint Barth.

Seahawk: Ketch_Perini Navi_Holland_58.6m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi at Saint Barth.

Seahawk, in Grande Dames class, hit the rocks off Roche Table but was able to clear itself and sail to fifth, nevertheless, claiming the top spot on the leaderboard for a second day.

When Clan VIII briefly lost its steering at the same spot, it infringed on the rights of Zenji, causing Zenji to miss a turning mark, but, as is the case in most such Bucket instances, the Clan crew gracefully accepted its penalty and no doubt plans to supply some drinks to the Zenji crew at the Bucket Bash later this evening.

“This was the kind of day that taxes bow and mast teams first because of the physical hoists and drops,” said Jonathan Kline, the safety officer aboard Clan VIII, “then safety officers and tacticians second because of the close quarters of the ‘wiggly’ course, with the fleets converging and crossing.”

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi

Silencio: Ketch_Perini Navi_Perini_50.0m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi

Cape Arrow won the Gazelle class today with less than six minutes separating her from second-place finisher Nilaya, but the two are inverted on the overall scoreboard for Nilaya’s advantage going into tomorrow’s final race.

 

Moonbird has the most consistent finishes (2-2) in Mademoiselle class to lead overall, with Bequia having fallen to second from first yesterday.

New to the 2014 Bucket –  The Golden Pineapple Award, Sponsored by Hotel St Barth Isle de France. The Bucket Directors have added this award to the 2014 edition of the St Barths Bucket to reward an essential element of the event, who will WIN THE PARTY?For more information, and the full list of entries, visitbucketregattas.com/stbarths/Racing concludes on Sunday March 30.Live race tracking by TracTrac enhances the Bucket experience for friends, families and fans of the Bucket. Access that link atbucketregattas.com/stbarths/dailyupdate

Whitehawk: Ketch_Neilson_King_28.0m  Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi — at Saint Barth.

Whitehawk: Ketch_Neilson_King_28.0m
Saint Barth Bucket Race 2014 Race1 Photo: © Carlo Borlenghi at Saint Barth.

16_SB2013_rotate

 The Bucket Directors are pleased to announce The Golden Pineapple Award. Since the very beginning, the Bucket Regattas have been focused on great sailing competition, seamanship, sportsmanship, a large dose of creative left-field fun and most of all, hospitality and sharing the joy of this magnificent sport among the fleet.This year our good friends aboard Yacht AXIA; the yacht that has shown up at past events as everything from fully clad Spartans in uniform, to the complete line-up of Greek Gods including Poseidon, Thor, a thunderbolt and live goat, pirates, spreader dancing sea horses and all manner of creative fun and frolic, have raised the bar once again. This year it seems that 007 will be lurking in the shadows of Gustavia and, who knows what havoc that may wreak!! Be forewarned, AXIA is locked and loaded to put yet another full spin on the Party concept! As you will see from the attached invitations to Friday’s “Yacht Hop”, they’re not going half-way!!Without a doubt, the challenge is on for quite simply, the best hospitality for the St. Barths Bucket Yacht Hop on Friday, 28 March. Aboard many yachts in the past the parties have been theme based on the full spectrum of fun but the simple question to be resolved is this: Who can throw the best party?? The Bucket Directors are somewhat abashed to admit that in many years of managing this event, we’ve failed to reward the most essential element of the Bucket. The last line in our sailing instructions says it clearly. . . WIN THE PARTY!!! Consider that problem solved. Since the very beginning, the Bucket Regattas have been fully focused on sharing the boundless fun of this magnificent sport, with hospitality among the fleet a core value. Hence, the Pineapple Logo, the symbol of hospitality. Therefore, this year in St. Barths, the yacht that puts forward the best “Open Boat” party spirit will be the recipient of the GOLDEN PINEAPPLE AWARD! Given the fact that we are a little short on time to grow a golden pineapple. . . Let’s say that the winner of this award will be “wined and dined” with eight guests at the Bucket’s expense, at the finest restaurant in St. Barthelemy. The judging in Bucket Tradition, will be ad-hoc but fair. Do note that as usual, the Open Boat Party is limited to race participants wearing event wristbands. Invitees are absolutely at the Owner’s discretion, as directed by those tending the boarding gate.

.New Launches to Compete 

The fleet will include a number of the latest launches from the world’s premier superyacht builders.Two recently launched Perini Navi yachts designed by Ron Holland will join the fleet: the newly designed 40m Sloop, STATE OF GRACE and a new 60m Ketch. SEAHAWK will be easily distinguished not only by her magnificent profile, but also by her crimson Aramid standing rigging by Future Fibers, supporting her towering spars.Making their Bucket debut are competing 2012 launches from the Royal Huisman Shipyard. The classic Spirit of Tradition 38m sloop, PUMULA and the 49m Ketch KAMAXITHA are both Dykstra Naval Architects designs.INOUI, the brilliant green 36m carbon fiber sloop by Vitters Shipyard will pace the fleet around the various courses. Also from Vitters, the 46m Sloop GANESHA will join us for her racing debut.These six new launches will join their thirty two competitors, most of which have sailed in numerous Bucket Regattas, to comprise yet another Bucket superyacht fleet of historic proportions.

Schedule Updates  Registration will open at 0900 on 27 March, with a “Rules Review” seminar beginning concurrently. After a day of practice sailing, learning and taming the ropes (lines), the Skippers Meeting, Welcome Party and Owner’s reception will follow.After Friday’s racing, at 1700 the Bucket will host a presentation by the Environmental Agency of St Barths and the NGO Megaptera, to educate the community on a concurrent scientific project, tagging and tracking whale migrations. The symposium will be followed by the Fleet Open House, a traditional highlight of all Bucket events.Saturday night will host the annual Bucket Bash on the Quay in Gustavia. With a tropical theme, there will be dining, dancing and music by the very popular Soley into the night!This year for the Sunday evening awards, the Government of St Barths has extended an invitation for the Awards Ceremony to be held on the grounds of the Hôtel de la Collectivité, the Government offices across the harbor from the Capitainerie. We have gratefully accepted the invitation and look forward to sharing Bucket Hospitality with the entire racing fleet and our friends in St Barths.

Racing and Awards  In the Bucket Tradition, racing will be pursuit style with the slowest rated yachts starting first and finishes determined by the order of finish. The fleet is divided into four classesLes Grandes Dames, Les Mademoiselles, Les Elegantesand Les Gazelles des Mers and we will continue the successful focus on competition within the classes. All yachts share the same starting and finishing line and sail the assigned course for their specific class. The starting times are structured, such that the classes finish at different times – in the interest of safety, the gap between class finishes will likely be approximately 10 minutes as it was last year.Live Race Tracking is an exciting addition to the race coverage. Details on how to connect and view the races will be provided in our next update and will be posted on the web site.Daily awards will be presented to the top finishers in each class. Handcrafted, limited edition Chelsea Clocks will be awarded to the four class winners, with second and third place in each class also receiving elegant trophies. The overall winner will be recognized as well. The yacht’s name will be added to the perpetual St Barths Bucket trophy and they will receive a beautiful crystal Bucket keepsake trophy.As usual, we will pay particular attention to the traditional Bucket discretionary awards for meritorious acts and the occasional eyebrow raising behavior that perpetuates the “je ne sais quoi” spirit of the event. These include the Wolter Huisman “Spirit of the Bucket Award”, the Vitters Seamanship and Sportsmanship Trophy, the Holland Jachtbouw Cool Crew Award and the coveted Skulduggery Cravat, for the yacht or crew that demonstrates the best and most fun, ‘left field non-adult behavior”.

St. Barths Charity Donation  Each year, the Bucket Regatta designates a portion of the entry fees for donation to a meaningful non-profit program in St Barths. This year the St Joseph School and their grounds improvement project will be the recipient of our donation.One of the oldest educational institutions on the island, The St Joseph School is a private Catholic institution that welcomes more than 200 students ages 3-11, from kindergarten through primary school. The school is in need of funds to improve the schoolyard/playground, where the clay coated sand is a health risk to the children and must be upgraded.The 2014 St Barths Bucket is pleased to be able to help the St Joseph School and allow the children to continue to learn and grow in a healthy environment.We are grateful to be joined by several new supporting sponsors. They will help us to continue the Bucket tradition that celebrates the superyacht industry and recognizes the yachts and their owners as they perpetuate this marvelous sport.Skuld Yacht brings a major marine underwriting firm to the superyacht arena with tremendous capabilities for innovation and tailoring coverage to our owner’s specific needs.Tradewind Aviation has also joined the Bucket fleet with generous support, while providing by far a most efficient way to get to our favorite Caribbean destination.

RACING CLASSES AND  ENTRIES


  
LES GAZELLES DES MERS  (8) HDCP   Max   SA/DP SA/DP
Yacht Rig Builder Designer (med) LOA (m) Draft (m) Displ (mt) DLR Up Down
Hetairos Ketch Baltic Dykstra NA 1.718 66.7 9.0 245 52.1 42.3 80.9
Visione Sloop Baltic Reichel Pugh 1.649 44.9 6.7 125 59.4 39.2 77.7
Saudade Sloop Wally Tripp 1.552 45.0 6.6 174 75.7 33.3 65.2
Kamaxitha Ketch Royal Huisman Dykstra NA 1.527 55.0 6.8 245 91.0 36.7 60.0
Inoui Sloop Vitters Briand 1.467 33.0 5.4 85 90.0 29.2 64.2
Nilaya Sloop Reichel Pugh Baltic 1.462 34.1 5.5 87 79.7 31.9 64.8
Rainbow Sloop Holland Jachtbouw Dykstra NA 1.388 40.0 5.0 237.1 29.8 46.4
Cape Arrow Sloop Souther Wind Farr-Nauta 1.235 30.0 6.7 64.8 92.4 28.5 48.8
  
LES ELEGANTES DES MERS (10) HDCP   Max   SA/DP SA/DP
Yacht Rig Builder Designer (med) LOA (m) Draft (m) Displ (mt) DLR Up Down
Ganesha Sloop Vitters Dubois 1.472 45.9 6.6 252 99.6 26.7 55.7
Ohana Sloop Fitzroy Dubois 1.360 49.7 5.5 361 110.6 23.3 45.1
Lady B Sloop Vitters Dubois 1.336 44.7 6.1 266 104.0 23.8 51.8
Varsovie Sloop Swan Frers 1.264 30.5 4.1 86 117.8 26.8 50.5
Unfurled Sloop Royal Huisman Frers 1.256 34.1 5.8 135 137.4 23.6 46.9
Marie Ketch Vitters Hoek 1.240 54.6 4.8 315 133.9 27.5 51.2
Hyperion Sloop Royal Huisman Frers 1.233 47.5 4.8 337 129.6 21.7 45.4
Twizzle Ketch Royal Huisman Dubois 1.202 57.5 10.9 562 123.5 26.2 39.0
Adele Ketch Vitters Hoek 1.176 54.6 4.8 340 133.0 25.7 45.8
Adela Schooner Pendennis Rest. Dykstra NA 1.138 54.9 5.0 285 150.2 25.9 41.8
  
LES MADEMOISELLES DES MERS (11) HDCP   Max   SA/DP SA/DP
Yacht Rig Builder Designer (med) LOA (m) Draft (m) Displ (mt) DLR Up Down
Pumula Sloop Royal Huisman Dykstra NA 1.259 37.4 5.0 128 157.7 17.3 29.9
Sarafin Sloop Oyster Marine Dubois 1.165 30.8 3.9 120 141.7 19.0 39.4
Moonbird Sloop Fitzroy Dubois 1.160 37.1 4.1 179 141.8 24.0 37.1
Lush Sloop Oyster Marine Humphreys 1.160 27.5 3.5 77.7 148.2 21.2 34.0
Axia Ketch Palmer Johnson S&S 1.143 37.6 3.7 168 155.4 21.2 34.1
Whitehawk Ketch Neilson King 1.057 28.0 4.5 77 156.8 23.8 40.4
Marama Ketch N2A Preslec 1.029 30.9 3.5 70 100.2 25.2 25.2
Bequia Yawl Brooklin BY Stephens 1.021 27.5 2.8 67 228.7 21.0 43.2
Genevieve Sloop Alloy Dubois 0.978 36.9 3.4 190 157.7 17.3 29.8
Blue Too Ketch Alloy Holland 0.977 33.8 3.5 143 196.3 21.6 30.9
Wavelength Sloop Pendennis Holland 0.938 27.4 3.3 81 222.5 19.2 32.4
LES GRANDES DAMES DES MERS (9) HDCP   Max   SA/DP SA/DP
Yacht Rig Builder Designer (med) LOA (m) Draft (m) Displ (mt) DLR Up Down
State of Grace Sloop Perini Navi Holland 1.130 40.0 9.0 233 160.2 24.5 34.9
Seahawk Ketch Perini Navi Holland 1.096 58.6 12.3 551 118.6 17.9 31.1
Clan VIII Sloop Perini Navi Holland 0.992 45.1 4.0 362 189.8 18.8 31.2
Meteor Schooner Royal Huisman Dykstra NA 0.965 51.6 4.3 315 176.3 24.7 36.3
Parsifal III Ketch Perini Navi Holland 0.917 54.0 4.5 469 141.9 22.8 35.4
Altair Sloop Derecktor S&S 0.914 29.2 2.7 112 204.2 15.6 25.6
Zenji Ketch Perini Navi Holland 0.910 56.0 3.9 530 137.5 20.5 27.6
Silencio Ketch Perini Navi Perini 0.882 50.0 3.2 422 183.7 16.6 22.4
Andromeda la Dea Ketch Perini Navi Perini 0.868 46.5 3.4 391 189.2 14.2 23.2

 

 

4_SB2013_rotate

 

FANTASTICAAAANIENE Swan 100 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

FANTASTICAAAANIENE Swan 100 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

The Rolex Swan Cup is one of the most visually captivating sailing competitions: a unique meeting of some of the world’s finest yachts, all built by Nautor’s Swan. So far, nearly 70 Swan yachts have confirmed participation and the final figure is expected to reach 100 – an impressive showing for one of the Mediterranean’s most iconic yachting occasions. This biennial event was inaugurated in 1980 and its enduring partnership with Rolex began in 1984. Traditionally held in Porto Cervo, Sardinia, the 17th edition takes place from 10-16 September.

RITA Swan 55 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

RITA Swan 55 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Four classes are anticipated: Maxi (18.29 metres/60 feet and above), Grand Prix (18.28m and below), Classic (models designed by Sparkman and Stephens) and Swan 45 One-Design, where 2010 World Champion Earlybird (GER) is returning to defend her crown.

The international reach of the Rolex Swan Cup is confirmed by the presence of some 13 countries in the entry list. Debutante Russian entrant Bronenosec (Swan 60) has been a regular on the 2012 Rolex circuit with notable performances at both the Rolex Volcano Race and the Giraglia Rolex Cup. Plis Play (ESP, Swan 80), which also featured at the Rolex Volcano Race, is one of two Spanish entries. The other is Clem (Swan 56), which finished a close second in the Grand Prix class in 2010.

 

Two yachts that will be aiming to improve their 2010 results are the Italian Swan 65 Shirlaf and the German Swan 60 Emma. Both finished second in their respective classes (Classic and Maxi) two years ago. Shirlaf is one of a number of participating Swan 65s; the classic Sparkman & Stephens design won the inaugural Whitbread Round the World Race in 1974 and helped cement Nautor’s Swan’s legendary status in yachting’s firmament.

The Swan 43 Fidibù has the honour of representing the make’s homeland of Finland. Arriving from furthest afield appears to be the American crew on Constanter (Swan 62RS). The smallest participant at 11.66 metres (38 feet), Italian Swan 38 Only You is also one of the oldest, while the largest yacht attending is the 34.4-metre (112-foot) Swan Highland Breeze.

GERONIMO Swan 651  (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

GERONIMO Swan 651 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Five days of racing are scheduled on the revered waters of the Costa Smeralda and the Maddalena Archipelago. Competition will be fierce but refreshing, as regular competitor and President of Nautor’s Swan since 1998, Leonardo Ferragamo, explains: “The event has a unique spirit because it represents a love of boats and a desire to compete not just in any regatta, but in a regatta where there is uniformity in the competition. The feelings of friendship and good sportsmanship that characterize this regatta have grown over time.”

The regatta is organized by the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda and concludes with a traditional prize-giving on the Piazza Azzura where winners of all four categories will be presented with a Rolex timepiece to crown their excellence on the water.

Ginger Swan 70 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

Ginger Swan 70 (Photo by Rolex / Carlo Borlenghi)

White Rhino (Photo by George Bekris)

White Rhino (Photo by George Bekris)

Ideal sailing conditions, perfect starts and a 16-18 knot southwesterly breeze allowed the 26 boats competing in the 2012 Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR) to power up on Friday, August 17, and provide a great show for the spectators who turned out to see them off on their offshore adventure.  The IRC, PHRF and PHRF Doublehanded fleets were sent on the 122 nautical mile Nomans course, while the two boats racing in the PHRF Cruising Spinnaker class took on the 103 nautical mile Buzzards Tower course.

Weather conditions led to a prediction that the leaders in IRC would be at the finish line off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club sometime after sunrise on Saturday morning, where they would receive the traditional champagne welcome.  That prophecy came true for the Ker 40 Catapult owned by Marc Glimcher (New York, N.Y.), which had passed the first mark of the course with about a minute lead on the rest of the IRC fleet and held on to take line honors just before 6:30 a.m. on Saturday morning.

Line Honors Winner Catapult (Photo by Megan Sepe)

Line Honors Winner Catapult (Photo by Megan Sepe)

 

“This race was fantastic,” said Geoff Ewenson (Annapolis, Md.) who was the navigator on Catapult.  “They made a very good decision in shortening the course to a 122 miler.  It really allowed all of the IRC boats to race reasonably tightly and there was everything to the race without the extra 25 or 30 or 40 miles.  In the end everybody on our team, and I’m sure on the 42s, felt like it was the perfect length race.  We got all the conditions, all the angles, we had a bit of everything and we didn’t feel that the race drug on at all.  For us it ended at the right time.“

 

Breakaway by George Bekris

Breakaway (Photo by George Bekris)

Ewenson sailed the inaugural Ida Lewis Distance Race in 2004 and recalled that they finished that race in the wee hours of Sunday morning with the race taking what seemed like forever.  This year after finishing the race in under 17 hours he explained that the challenge was whether to get into a watch system or tough it out and sail everybody up.  “We realized there would be short bits during the race when it wouldn’t be stability conditions and so we had to steal little naps then.  The most anybody slept on our boat was probably an hour.”

 

For their efforts, Catapult collected the Ida Lewis Distance Race Commodore’s Trophy for the IRC class win, along with the perpetual Russell L. Hoyt Memorial Trophy for best elapsed time. For Ewenson, winning the Hoyt award had special meaning.

 

“When I was 10 years old I sailed home from Bermuda on Russell Hoyt’s boat Destination.  I grew up in Newport and knew Russell and I considered him to be a friend even though he was quite a bit older than me.  It really is quite nice to be able to be on the boat that comes back and wins the trophy that’s named after him.”
The 56’ Swan White Rhino captured the glory in the 14-strong PHRF class.  Owner Todd Stuart (Key West, Fla.) almost pulled out of the race when he thought he wouldn’t have enough crew.  It all came together with a number of his regular crew, including sailors he has twice done the Bermuda Race with, forming the core of this race’s team.  “We had a great race; it was a lot of fun,” said Stuart after collecting the Lime Rock Trophy for the class win.  “We started out fast and the wind held up for us and when it’s windy our boat’s pretty quick, and I think we got lucky.  When we turned around, I think the winds were changing behind us a little bit.  I think some of the slower boats that could have caught us on corrected time, if the winds had held up, I think the door just closed on them.  For a brief period we were down to about four knots of breeze during the thunderstorms; we barely got wet and then the winds came back to being favorable for us.  We made good time the whole way.  We made a decision to leave Block Island to starboard and I think that was the right choice because a boat that was pretty much neck-and-neck with us left it to port and when we both got on the back side we had definitely gained a couple miles on them.”

Stuart raced the 2011 ILDR in the IRC class, and because he expected to have fewer crew kept White Rhino in PHRF for this year’s race.  “This was perfect as we had a bunch of new people on the boat so we thought we’d play it safe and make the boat a little less dramatic.  Until the storms came through it was a perfect starlit night with little meteorites here and there.  Nobody complained this year about the distance.  It was a fast race and we finished in 17 hours.  Seems perfect to me.  We had an awesome time.  This is actually our first win in a real race so my wife Lisa [the cook on all of White Rhino’s distance races] and I, we’re very excited about it.”

 

 

The win in the PHRF Doublehanded class was taken by Paul Cronin (Jamestown, R.I.) and Jim Anderson on the Quest 30 Kincora, with the PHRF Cruising Spinnaker prize going to the Nautor Swan 55 Haerlemowned by Hendrikus Wisker (Round Hill, Va.).  Four boats had met the requirement that more than 40% of the crew must have reached their 14th birthday but not turn 20 prior to August 17, to compete for the Youth Challenge, and Chris Bjerregaard’s (Bristol, R.I.) Bashford Howlson 36 Shearwater earned that honor.

 

Spearheading a new challenge for college teams to compete in this late-summer distance race, SUNY Maritime College (Throggs Neck, N.Y.) reinstated the William E. Tuthill Trophy which was last presented in 1978 to the winner of the Eastern Inter-Collegiate Overnight Race.  The trophy honors Tuthill, an avid sailor and member of the class of 1973, who met with accidental death at sea on the summer cruise in 1972.  Massachusetts Maritime College (Buzzards Bay, Mass.) bested SUNY Maritime to receive the trophy in what is planned to be a continuing challenge.

 

The Ida Lewis Distance Race is a qualifier for the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); the Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.
Starting Line sponsors for the 2012 Ida Lewis Distance Race are the City of NewportNew England BoatworksNewport Shipyard and North Sails.  Contributing sponsors are Blue Water Technologies,Dockwise Yacht TransportFlint Audio VideoGoslings RumMac DesignsSea Gear UniformsStella ArtoisRig Pro Southern Spars and Zblok.
Find more information online at www.ildistancerace.org — including the ability to relive the race viaKattack LIVE ; or “Like” ILDR on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ILYCDistanceRace

Ida Lewis Distance Race – Top-three Results

Place, Yacht Name, Type, Owner/Skipper, Hometown

Class 1 – IRC (6 Boats)

1. Catapult, Ker 40, Mark Glimcher, New York, N.Y.

2. Barleycorn, Swan 42, Brendan Brownyard, Bay Shore, N.Y.

3. Blazer, Swan 42, Christopher Culver, Stamford, Conn.

 

Class 2 – PHRF (14 Boats)

1. White Rhino, Swan, Todd Stuart, Key West, Fla.

2. Samba, Quest 30, Tristan Mouligne, Newport, R.I.

3. Wazimo, Aerodyne 37.66, Bob Manchester, Barrington, R.I.

 

Class 3 – PHRF Double-Handed (4 Boats)

1. Kincora, Quest 30, Paul Cronin, Jamestown, R.I.

2. Oronoco, Sabre 426, Adrian Ravenscroft, Cohasset, Mass.

3. Breakaway, J/35, Paul Grimes, Portsmouth, R.I.

 

Class 4 – PHRF Cruising Spinnaker (2 Boats)

1. Haerlem, Nautor Swan 55, Hendrikus Wisker, Round Hill, Va.

2. Gigi, Gulfstar 50, Joe Cleverdon, Newport, R.I.

 

Rambler At Voiles de Saint Barths 2010 ( Photo by  Christophe Jouany/Voiles de Saint Barths)

Voiles de Saint Barths ( Photo by Christophe Jouany/Voiles de Saint Barths)

When the third annual Les Voiles des St. Barth gets underway this April 2-7, there will be more that meets the eye than the simply stunning panoramic views of the colorful French West Indies island that hosts the event and the expansive blue Caribbean ocean that surrounds it. Competitive sailors and, for that matter, local residents and visitors alike will have the privilege of also indulging in the indelible impressions left by the aesthetically unmatched designs of some of the world’s finest yachts participating as well as the passion of their owners.

Among the 60+ entrants registered to date is what many call the world’s most famous yacht of all time: the 52’ (15.8 metre) yawl Dorade. Purchased in 2010 by Matt Brooks (San Francisco, Calif.), Dorade was designed by the late Olin Stephens and originally launched in 1930. She influenced nearly all developments in yacht design for the next three decades and was hugely successful in distance racing, taking overall victory in the 1931 Transatlantic race and the 1931 and 1933 Fastnet races, among others. Now, Brooks, who has spent the last year overseeing a refit and major restoration of Dorade, is utilizing Les Voiles de St. Barth as a platform for both yacht and crew preparation, with the goal of entering Dorade in her first major modern ocean race this summer: the Newport to Bermuda Race, in which she finished second in both 1930 and 1932.

“We are assembling and training a crew with the right skills, chemistry and experience to race Dorade and win,” said Brooks, who is a world champion in the Six Meter class as well as an accomplished mountain climber and world record-holding jet pilot. “We also are toughening up Dorade herself, readying her for the kind of long-range sailing she hasn’t seen in decades, keeping in mind that while she may be game, she is also an 80-year-old lady.”

Dorade will sail in the Classics division against such other standouts as Kate, an Intel 60 (18.2 metre); Cruinneag III, a 63’ (19.4 metre) ketch, and Marie Des Isles, a Gran Shpountz 65 (20 metre). Among Dorade’s crew will be John Burnham, an IOD World Champion and Shields ClassNational Champion; legendary Bermudian sailor Buddy Rego; Jesse Sweeney, Dorade’s navigator and a member of the Camper Emirates Team New Zealand’s meteorology team for the Volvo Ocean Race; and Jamie Hilton, a two-time 12 Meter World and North American Champion, who also was a member of Brooks’s team when it won the 2011 Six Meter World Cup.

Voiles de Saint Barths 2010( Photo by Christophe Jouany/Voiles de Saint Barths)

Voiles de Saint Barths 2010( Photo by Christophe Jouany/Voiles de Saint Barths)

“St. Barth is a legendary destination and a beautiful place to sail, and we are expecting great wind, great camaraderie among the competitors, and a good test of the new and improved Dorade,” said Brooks.

Another remarkable yacht that will be seen in St. Barth is the Hoek 115’ (35.2 metre) Firefly, the recently launched prototype for the new one-design F Class. The superyacht was designed to hold her own against larger (130’/39.7 metre) J Class yachts and sports some similarities such as a towering rig and long bow and stern overhangs to those massive yachts, which were built in the 1930s and have experienced a rebirth.

According to her designers, Firefly is a perfect mix of classic lines and retro-design details, optimizing her for the Spirit of Tradition classes hosted by some regattas, but at Les Voiles de St. Barth she will depend on her high-performance racing characteristics to prevail against eight other yachts thus far signed up in Maxi class (yachts 75’/22.86 metres and longer).

“The concept is to have a beautiful, classic-looking boat with a modern underbody, using the latest technologies in deck gear and rigging solely for use as a racing boat and/or daysailer,” said Mark van Gelderen, who supervised Fireflys nine-month building process and has been the captain since she splashed in June of 2011. Having headed straight to the Med to compete in a handful of maxi events, Firefly was further optimized to improve performance before heading to the Caribbean.

“We have a relatively young crew combined of professional sailors, very good amateurs and friends of the owner,” added van Gelderen, who will be skippering and driving together with the owner. “Within the crew we have Olympic, Volvo Ocean Race, big boat and dinghy experienced sailors a great combination of very motivated guys!”

Van Gelderen also explained that St. Barth will offer a great place for guests and crew to be entertained when not participating in racing. “There are beaches, great restaurants, shopping and peace and tranquility, all within close proximity,” van Gelderen said. “It’s the perfect combination.”

While three other Maxi Class boats — the 112’/34 metre Baltic Nilaya, the 112’/34 metre Swan Highland Breeze, and the 115’/35 metre Farr Sojana — are nicely matched size-wise to Firefly, no one is quite sure how they or five smaller Maxis in the class are going to compare speed-wise. Certainly all eyes will be on the 90′ (27.4 metre) Reichel/Pugh Rambler, which won the inaugural Les Voiles de St. Barth and has been brought out of retirement by its owner George David (Hartford, Conn.) after its successor, Rambler 100 (which won last years Les Voiles de St. Barth with David steering) lost its keel and capsized in the 2011 Fastnet.

“These races invariably start a mile or two off Gustavia (the main harbor and capital of St. Barth), which means in any kind of a northeasterly trade it is a shifty first leg to a weather mark just outside the harbor,” said David, who most recently finished second overall and second in class with Rambler at the 2012 RORC Caribbean 600. “Then there are a couple of miles reaching either way across the south side of the island, so it’s a parade after that first weather mark, and you don’t want to get there second. Our ride last year, Rambler 100, got us there first every time with boat lengths to spare. It wont be so easy in the 90 footer.”

David noted that 15 of Ramblers crew sailing in the Les Voiles de St. Barth were present at the now-famous Fastnet incident, and a majority of them have sailed in the last two runnings of this regatta.

In addition to the Classic and Maxi classes at Les Voiles de St. Barth, there will also be a Racing Class with divisions for Spinnaker, Non-Spinnaker, 52-Footers, and Multihulls. Other notable entries include the Tripp 75 Blackbird, the Carkeek 40 Decision, the X 65 Karuba 5, and the Irens 63 trimaran Paradox.

With a Tuesday (April 3) through Saturday (April 7) schedule that includes four days of intense racing and a lay day on Thursday (April 5), the regatta kicks off on Monday, April 2, with opening ceremonies and cocktails at the festive Race Village on the Quai General de Gaulle overlooking Gustavia Harbor, where the event is headquartered. Lay day events planned for Nikki Beach include lunch and a surprise sporting challenge for all crews. Evening activities include off-site parties as well as post-racing bands and entertainment in the Race Village.

Official Poster
Organizers unveiled the official limited edition Les Voiles de St. Barth 2012 poster by well-known St. Barth artist Antoine Heckly. Only 300 posters will be printed, with the original artwork to be auctioned off during the crew party –hosted by the real estate agency, Sibarth — at Shell Beach on Wednesday, April 4. Proceeds from this auction will be donated to FEMUR (Foundation for Emergency Medical Equipment) to fund the purchase of a CT scanner to be installed in the new Radiation Center in the island’s Hopital de Bruyn.

 

Yachts in St Barths (Photo courtesy of Laurent BENOIT / Les Voiles de Saint Barth )

Yachts in St Barths (Photo courtesy of Laurent BENOIT / Les Voiles de Saint Barth )

Sojana (Photo by Christophe Jouany  / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Sojana (Photo by Christophe Launay / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

An enthusiastic Ken Read (Newport, R.I.) got the 2011 sailing season off to a resounding start on board the new Maxi Yacht Rambler 100 in the Caribbean 600. The American skipper, who leads the Puma Ocean Racing project, has just won the event, leaving his rival Leopard 3 a long way behind and in so doing also grabbing the race record. Winner of last year’s inaugural running of the Les Voiles de St. Barth as skipper of George David’s (Hartford, Conn.) 90-footRambler, Read was naturally entrusted with the helm of Rambler 100 (the former Speedboat) when David took command of it earlier this year. Very excited by Rambler 100’s performance so far, Read is looking forward to the race program that lies ahead in the coming weeks. The second edition of the Les Voiles de St. Barth is next on the schedule (April 4-9), and with a mere mention of Read’s victory at the 2010 event, he admits without hesitation that he took advantage of “the best conditions ever experienced in my whole career….”

The prospect of once again facing their main rival Leopard 3 (owned by Great Britain’s Mike Slade) at Les Voiles de St. Barth–in closely fought contests on a variety of windy courses–is something that Read and David are extremely happy about. The Americans will bring along the whole of Read’s Puma Ocean Racing team, comprised of 15 top class professional sailors that will join seven other experienced crewmen to sail the powerful carbon Maxi Yacht.

“Don’t change a thing!,” said Read about the Les Voiles des St. Barth format, which features short daytime race courses that will have Rambler 100 and Leopard 3 facing off for the first time with that type of racing. “Rambler 100 and Leopard 3 are two huge monsters,” he said, explaining that both boats are entered in the Atlantic Ocean Racing Series, which reaches its climax in June with the 2011 Transatlantic Race from Newport, Rhode Island to The Lizard (UK). “They are record-breaking boats designed for long ocean races and major offshore courses; however, for our crew, it is vital to be able to compete in inshore races like those that will be held in St. Barth. Our battle against Leopard 3 will be very demanding for the crews and fascinating to watch, as we will be alongside each other for a lot of the time and it is bound to offer a maximum level of excitement.”

The Caribbean 600 represented an intermediate format for Ken Read and his crew, and it very quickly turned to the advantage of Rambler 100, which led the way from start to finish in what were typically Caribbean conditions, with strong trade winds windward of the islands and tricky currents, particularly at night. “Sailing along at 26 knots under the stars, we had some great moments aboard Rambler 100, a boat that offers a completely new dimension to racing,” concluded Read. Peter Harrison’s (Great Britain) 115-foot Farr-designed Sojana, which stood out in the Les Voiles de St. Barth last year and will be back again this year, also took part in the Caribbean 600 alongside Genuine Risk, the 90-foot Dubois design that has registered for the Les Voiles de St. Barth for the first time and may also thwart the favorites’ plans.

“In St. Barth, each day is different,” said Read. “The race committee has done an excellent job coming up with courses around the islands that are spectacular and at the same time very demanding from a tactical perspective, as they mean we have to sail at every point of sail. The Les Voiles de St. Barth is also physically very tiring, as the strong regular winds that sweep across the islands at this time of year allow us to get the most out of the boat, implying frequent sail changes with each change of tack. Technically, this is a really interesting event, which is a fantastic complement to the Atlantic Ocean Racing Series.”

Key information:

With one month to go until the start of racing, the Les Voiles de St. Barth has registered no fewer than 49 yachts, divided according to their size and class in the following five divisions:

SUPER / MAXI YACHT : A Maxi yacht refers to a prototype yacht or one that is produced in limited numbers measuring at least 69’ in length: 8 boats registered

CLASSIC: Classic Yachts or traditional boats are boats that are at least 35 years old and fit into various categories: 5 boats registered

RACING: This division brings together racing monohulls designed specifically for coastal or offshore races: 15 boats registered

RACING-CRUISING : The Racing Cruising division includes chiefly series boats, fitted out for cruising as well as for racing: 17 boats registered

RACING- MULTIHULLS: This division includes racing multihulls, be they trimarans or catamarans, with a length between 30 and 60 feet and which are very light and fast: 4 boats registered

The Les Voiles de St. Barth officially begins on Monday, April 4, 2011 with the traditional registration process and the opening of the Voiles Village, Quai du Général De Gaulle in Gustavia. At 1300 hrs (local time) the next day (Tuesday, April 5), the Race Directors, under the leadership of Luc Poupon, will signal the start of racing on some exciting and varied race courses set up according to the weather conditions. Racing continues Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, with Thursday, April 7 set aside as a lay day, with a full list of festive events lined up, allowing the crews to rest and enjoy themselves along with the people of St. Barths. The closing evening on Saturday, April 9 will include the prize-giving
ceremony.

Sojana and Moneypenny (Photo by Christophe Jouany  / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Sojana and Moneypenny (Photo by Christophe Launay / Les Voiles de Saint-Barth)

Entries

LEOPARD 3
 GBR 1R FARR 100′ MIKE SLADE Pre-entry
 
SOJANA
 GBR 115 FARR 115 Peter HARRISON /Marc FIDZGERALD Pre-entry
 
BELLA PITA
 US 53560 TRIPP DESIGN 75′ JIM GRUNDY Pre-entry
 
HIGHLAND BREEZE
 888 SWAN 112 RS/GPR 112′ ALBERT KEULARTS Pre-entry
 
SPIIP
 FRA 8686 CNB 86 86′ ROBIN DE JONG Pre-entry
 
RAMBLER 100
   100′ GEORGE DAVID Pre-entry
 
MARAMA
   100′ GERARD NAIGEON Pre-entry
 
GENUINE RISK
 8390 DUBOIS/MC CONAUGHY 97′ HUGO STENBECK Pre-entry
 
Racing
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA Skipper Status
 
 
REGIS GUILLEMOT.COM
 FRA 96 POGO 40 S2 40′ REGIS GUILLEMOT Pre-entry
 
PANIC ATTACK
 750 OPEN 750 24′ JAN VANDEN EYNDE Pre-entry
 
NOVUS ACRA
 GBR 150 L BENETEAU F 50 50′ TONY MACBRIDE Pre-entry
 
BLACK HOLE
  SANTA CRUZ 37 37′ J. Hin Pre-entry
 
FIFI
 FRA 2114 X55 55 G;MARTIN Pre-entry
 
LANCELOT
 FRA 25597 BENETEAU 31.7 32 SERGE MAZARIO Pre-entry
 
TECHNOMARINE
 FRA 27917 Farr 36,7 DEREDEC Christian Pre-entry
 
OCEAN WARRIOR
 SA 3625 CLASS 40 40′ LENJOHN VAN DER WEL Pre-entry
 
PUFFY
 USA 45454 Farr 45 DEMARCHELLIER Patrick Pre-entry
 
ANTILOPE
 GRB 1513L GRAND SOLEIL 43′ WILLEM WESTER Pre-entry
 
LOST HORIZON
 ANT 104 J 122 40′ JAMES DOBBS Pre-entry
 
MONNEYPENNY
  TP 52 54′ JIM SWARTZ Pre-entry
 
VENOMOUS
 GBR 60006 FARR DESIGN 60′ PETER CUNNINGHAM Pre-entry
 
SPIRIT OF JUNO
 GBR 8653 R FARR 65 65′ RORY FAULKNER Pre-entry
 
SONIC OF AYR
 GBR 370 L SANTA CRUZ 37 37 RYAN BROOKES Pre-entry
 
Classic
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA Skipper Status
 
 
WHITE WINGS
 US2 W CLASS 76′ DAVID TOFIA Pre-entry
 
DUENDE
 10200 Herreshoff 43 43 D.Randy West Pre-entry
 
KATE
 ES5 MYLNE 60′ Walwyn Pre-entry
 
CARA MIA
 SUI 4405 SWAN  41′ PATRICK NICHOLAS Pre-entry
 
Racing Cruising
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA Skipper Status
 
 
FENIX
 GBR 9660R SWAN  60′ MORITZ BURMESTER Pre-entry
 
L’ESPERANCE
 123 Beneteau 45 VELASQUEZ Robert Pre-entry
 
VANILLE
 16286 FIRST 300 SPIRIT 30′ PHILIPPE HERVE Pre-entry
 
COSTA MESA
 88 DUFOUR 425 GL 43′ REY PASCAL Pre-entry
 
ORMEAU
  FINOT BENETEAU 47.3 ALAIN CHARLOT Pre-entry
 
MR. WALKER
 FRA 491 REQUIN 33 MELISSA RIMBAUD Pre-entry
 
LIL’E
 FRA 479 REQUIN 33 FOX MOWGLI Pre-entry
 
BEESE
  BERRET 50.5 ANDRE BEESE Registered 
 
MAE-LIA
  X-YACHT 34 MAGRAS Raphael Pre-entry
 
FESTING
  BERRET 50.5 PATRICK SMITH Registered 
 
SPEEDY NEMO
  DUFOUR  34′ RAYMOND MAGRAS Pre-entry
 
CORBAN
 97133 SWAN 42 HARPER Daniel Pre-entry
 
TARA II
  SUN ODYSSEY 54 DS 54′ HENRY ALBERT Pre-entry
 
SPLENDIDO
 FRA37407 GRAND SOLEIL 40′ PHILIPPE HERVOUET Pre-entry
 
NIX
 IVB 612 X-YACHT 60′ NICO CORTLEVER Pre-entry
 
AFFINITY
 US 50007 SWAN  48′ JACK DESMOND Pre-entry
 
SOLANO
 FRA 34625 LATINI 52 FELCI 52′ FREDERIC RIALLAND Pre-entry
 
DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER
 GRB 1007L ELAN 37′ ANNIE O’SULLIVAN Pre-entry
 
COYOTE 2
 GBR 9949 T FIRST 40.7 41′ KEN ACOTT Pre-entry
 
iLOST
  HARMONY 42 42′ HANNEKE STEGWEG Pre-entry
 
SHAMROCK VII
 USA 1 J 95 31′ THOMAS MULLEN Pre-entry
 
Racing Multihull
Yacht Name   Sail Design LOA Skipper Status
 
 
PHAEDO
 399BC GUNBOAT 66′ PAUL HAND Pre-entry
 
KARIBUNI PINEL
  COULOMBEL 40′ ERICK CLEMENT Pre-entry
 
BIANCA
  SEACART 30′ HERVE DE MARJOLIE Pre-entry
 
SPIRIT 
 GBR 565  40′ JASON GARD Pre-entry

Genuine Risk At Start Of Bermuda Race (Photo by George Bekris )

Genuine Risk At Start Of Bermuda Race (Photo by George Bekris )

Hanuman, Overall Winner Newport Bucket Regatta 2010 ( Photo by George Bekris )

Hanuman, Overall Winner Newport Bucket Regatta 2010 ( Photo by George Bekris )

Overall Winners

1st   Place   Hanuman
2nd  Place   White Wings
3rd   Place   Clevelander

Les Gazelles – Racing Class

1st   Hanuman
2nd  White Wings
3rd   Clevelander
 
Les Grand Dames – Cruising Class

1st    Meteor
2nd   Azzura
3rd    Gloria

Vitter’s Shipyard Seamanship Trophy

Easterner

Chippewa Bomb

Azzura

 
For More Images from the Newport Bucket Regatta visit our Images Page or click Here

Descriptions of Awards

Overall
These awards, first through third, are presented for the best performance overall for combined results, all classes, all races.

 
Les Gazelles & Les Grand Dames
In 2005, when the Bucket Regatta grew beyond all expectations and the fleet doubled in size, it was determined that the yachts should be split into classes that considered their essential attributes.  However, the distinction of “Cruising Division” and “Racing Division” seemed just, oh so pedestrian, for a fleet of this stature.  In the RC’s opinion, the designation of “Les Gazelles des Mers” for the Racing Division and “Les Grandes Dammes des Mers” for the Cruising Division, seemed far more appropriate.

Each Division has trophies presented for best performance overall, first through third.

 
Vitters Seamanship Trophy
Awarded to the yacht that demonstrates the best seamanship and sportsmanship in the interest of promoting safety on the race course.  All participants in the Bucket acknowledge that superyachts have serious limitations operating safely in close quarters and therefore, the RC has always valued safety well above performance.  This award will recognize the yacht that best demonstrates that understanding.  It also goes to prove that nice guys don’t always finish last!!