Spindrift 2 Maxi Trimaran Dona Bertarelli

Spindrift 2 Maxi Trimaran Dona Bertarelli

by Christophe Guigueno

The dismantling of the maxi-trimaran of 40 meters between Brest and the starting line of the Trophy Jules Verne last winter was stored in the trunk of bad memories on the side of Spindrift Racing. But the failure of the 100% male crew led the co-creator with Yann Guichard of the Swiss team to take the reins of the trimaran to set up a women-only crew for the next attempt against the world record  sailing.

 

In 2015, Dona Bertarelli was part of the crew of the trimaran Spindrift 2, formerly Banque Populaire and the largest offshore racing trimaran in the world. By completing the world tour in 47 days 1 hour 17 minutes and 41 seconds, the maxi-tri did not beat the Jules Verne Trophy record . But her co-skipper became the fastest woman around the world to sail. A title she now wants to share with other women.

A group drawn from the pool of the Volvo Ocean Race

The timing is also perfect for the Swiss, as under the initiative of Mark Turner, the Volvo Ocean Race , the crewed world tour with stopover aboard 65-foot monohulls, required the crew to board at least two women on board. This new rule means that many young women have acquired an enormous experience of the open sea on which Dona Bertarelli will be able to rely to build an international crew.

According to our sources, an emissary of Spindrift Racing was present in New Zealand during the last stopover to meet these potential teammates and present the project. A contact that would have met with great success with these women who, after a mixed world tour but a minority on board, would be ready to follow the wake of Tracy Edwards. A Frenchwoman also said she did not fear the pressure on men’s performance: “l pressure, I drink, I do not suffer!” she added …

In the wake of Edwards and MacArthur

A Jules Verne Trophy 100% feminine, it would not be a first since in 1998, the English Tracy Edwards who had already led a crew “zero testo” aboard the catamaran Royal Sun Alliance, the former Enza of Peter Blake born under the name Formula TAG for Mike Birch and now converted into a zero emission catamaran under the name of Energy Observer. After two years of preparation and numerous records, including the crossing of the English Channel, Tracy Edwards and her crew of 10 women (including her compatriot Samantha Davies) set off off Ouessant. The adventure ended on a dismasting 2000 miles from Chile.

Five years after this attempt, another woman tackles the challenge initiated by Yves Le Cornec, Titouan Lamazou and Florence Arthaud. This is Ellen MacArthur who starts the world tour with … 13 teammates! For the Englishwoman, the circumnavigation ends once again on a dismasting, this time off the Kerguelen.

Dismantling of Royal Sun Alliance, Kingfisher 2, Spindrift 2 … Attempts often end with a spar at the bottom of the water. So if Dona Bertarelli takes over the torch and will leave this winter with her 40 meter trimaran to establish this first time around the world with a 100% female crew, it will not be to plant it again at the bottom of the water but for the sting at the top of the sail all genders confused …

 


Women’s World Tours:
-  2015: Dona Bertarelli, co-skipper of the trimaran Spindrift 2: 47d 1h 17 ’41’ ‘(fastest woman around the world)
- 2003: Ellen MacArthur skipper of the catamaran Kingfisher 2 with 13 crew members. Departure on January 30, 2003. Drainage off the Kerguelen
- 1998: Tracy Edwards skipper of the Royal & Sun Alliance catamaran with a 100% female crew. Dismantling off Chile.

by Christophe Guigueno

 

Photo © Lloyd Images

François Gabart, who left Ouessant on November 4 (10:05 UTC+1) in a bid to set a new singlehanded round the world record, crossed the finishing line located between Lizard Point and Ouessant today at (02:45 UTC+1) to set a new record of 42 days, 16 hours, 40 minutes and 35 seconds.

Skippering the 30m MACIF trimaran, Gabart crushed the previous time taken by Thomas Coville on December 25 2016 (49 days, 3 hours, 4 minutes and 28 seconds) by 6 days, 10 hours, 23 minutes and 53 seconds.

This was Gabart’s first attempt at the record, and his time is now the second fastest outright time, crewed and singlehanded combined. Only IDEC Sport (Francis Joyon and crew) succeeded in achieving a better time in the Jules Verne Trophy (40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds).

 

François Gabart breaks Around the World Record (Photo © Alexis Courcoux / Macif)

 

The MACIF trimaran will have covered a true distance of 27,859.7 miles, with a true average over this course of 27.2 knots.

Gabart joins an elite group as only  three sailors to date had ever held the singlehanded round the world record – Francis Joyon, Ellen MacArthur, Thomas Coville – while leaving a lasting impression on everyone by beating the reference times one by one on his way.

The most significant ones were the distance sailed singlehanded in 24 hours (851 miles between November 13 and 14, against 784 miles, which was his own personal best), but also with crew and single-handed combined, on the Ouessant-Cape of Good Hope section (12 days, 20 hours and 10 minutes, the Pacific Ocean crossing (Tasmania to Cape Horn in 7 days, 15 hours and 15 minutes), and Cape Horn-equator (6 days, 22 hours and 15 minutes).

Photo © Alexis Courcoux / Macif

“I never dreamed of a time like this,” admitted Gabart. “On paper, with the weather and with what I am capable of doing with this boat, it was possible to beat the record, but in the best scenarios only by one or two days. It’s quite extraordinary.”

 

Team details – Tracker – Facebook

The key news of the round the world record
Date of departure: Saturday November 4, at 10:05 (French time, UTC+1)
Ouessant-Equator passage time: 05 d 20 h 45 min
Ouessant -Good Hope passage time: 11 d 20 h 10 min
Ouessant-Cape Agulhas passage time: 11 d 22 h 20 min
Ouessant-Cape Leeuwin passage time: 19 d 14 h 10 min
Ouessant-Cape Horn passage time: 29 d 03 h 15 min
Ouessant-Equator return: 36 d 01 h and 30 min
Equator-Equator passage time: 30 d 04 h and 45 min (new single-handed record)
Cape Horn-Equator passage time: 06 d 22 h and 15 min (new reference time outright)
24-hour distance record: 851 miles (Nov 14, 2017)

Photo © Thierry Martinez/ Sea&Co.

While attempting the record of the Tour du monde upside down solo, multihull, Ultim Actual capsized off Cape Horn around 4am French time. 

Yves Le Blevec is well, he is safe inside his boat, the relief organization is in progress.

The skipper Actual had doubled the hard course at 1h 34min in the night from Wednesday to Thursday 14 December, in difficult weather conditions: 30 to 50 knots, bursts to 70 just before crossing the Cape, a sea 5 to 6 meters from hollow.

At 4:21 am, this Thursday morning, Yves le Blevec triggered his first distress beacon. 40 minutes later, he operated his second beacon, confirming the seriousness of the situation. The CROSS immediately alerted the Chilean MRCC, the organization responsible for safety at sea for this area.

The technical team was able to join Yves: he is not injured, he is safe inside his boat while waiting for help.

One of the trimaran’s port linkage broke, causing the Ultim to capsize. The west-northwest wind was 30 to 40 knots at the time of the capsizing, there was 5m of trough.

The situation is stabilized, the boat is about thirty miles in the south-west of Cape Horn, it drifts a little to the south-east, a safe zone.

 

Spindrift Racing Maxi Trimaran (Photo © Chris Schmid / Spindrift racing )

On 6 November 2017 Spindrift racing, the France-based sailing team will be starting the standby period for its second attempt on the Jules Verne Trophy, the iconic non-stop round the world record.

Spindrift’s skipper, Yann Guichard (FRA), has carefully selected a crew of eleven sailors who bring with them a depth of sailing experience from the worlds of Figaro, Olympics and racing multihulls.  His crew include seven who formed part of the first attempt on the record, with the other five bringing multiple complementary skills to the team.

The current Jules Verne Trophy record, set by Francis Joyon and his crew last winter, stands at 40 days, 23 hours and 30 minutes, and Spindrift has spent much of the past two years optimising its 40-metre maxi-trimaran, Spindrift 2, in Brittany to take on this new challenge.

Joining the team are Thierry Chabagny (FRA) just returned from a Solitaire and a Fastnet in the Figaro, Ewen Le Clech (FRA), who rejoins the trimaran having worked on updating it with Pascal Bidégorry in 2010.  Britain’s Sam Goodchild joined Yann Guichard on the match-race circuit this season, having spent two years racing offshore trimarans.  Also joining is Thomas Le Breton (FRA), a former member of the French Olympic team in the Laser and then the Finn, who has recently returned from Bermuda where he was a tactician for the French challenge in the America’s Cup. Finally, completing this group are Tanguy Cariou, ex-member of the French Olympic team and crew in D35, who will be on the first part of the stand-by, and then Erwan Le Roux (part of the Spindrift 2 crew for the Transat Québec-Saint Malo) will take over from November 26, 2017, when he returns from the Transat Jacques Vabre.This five-man squad will join Yann Guichard and six crew from the 2015 attempt. These are sailors that Guichard knows well: Xavier Revil, Christophe Espagnon and François Morvan have all run Olympic campaigns together.  Antoine Carraz or Jacques Guichard have been part of the Spindrift team since its inception, and Erwan Israel is back onboard again as navigator.

Nine records in 24 years: 
Yann Guichard is in no doubt of the incredibly tough challenge that lies ahead and has appointed Jean-Yves Bernot to be the onshore weather router for this attempt.
The original record set by Commodore Explorer was for 79 days 6 hours and 16 minutes, in the intervening 24 years the record has been almost halved and after iDec Sport’s successful challenge last winter, now stands at 40 days 23 hours 30 minutes.

2017 Jules Verne Trophy Crew: 
Yann Guichard (skipper)
Erwan Israël (navigator)
Jacques Guichard (watch captain/helm/timmer)
Christophe Espagnon (watch captain / helm / bow)
Xavier Revil (watch captain /helm /trimmer)
François Morvan (helm / trimmer)
Antoine Carraz (helm / trimmer)
Thierry Chabagny (helm /bow)
Ewen Le Clech (helm / trimmer)
Sam Goodchild (helm / bow)
Thomas Le Breton (helm / trimmer)
Tanguy Cariou  (helm / trimmer) / Erwan Le Roux  (helm / trimmer)

 

Francis Joyon before leaving NYC to break his own Solo Transatlantic Record on IDEC SPORT (Photo by George Bekris)

Francis Joyon comes early this morning to add a new line to his legend. He beat his very own solo crossing record set in June 2013 on his old 29-meter IDEC trimaran by exactly 49 minutes. He repeated this weekend aboard the maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT, the same plan VPLP on board which he last winter, crewed the Jules Verne Trophy record. For its first solo transatlantic aboard this giant originally designed for a crew of 12 men, it improves the mythical time between New York and Cape Lizard “to the Joyon”, without any previous preparation or standby , No sophisticated weather routing, just talent, envy and incredible ability, at the age of 61,

By cutting the longitude of Cape Lizard, which marks the finish line of the North Atlantic crossing record from Ambrose Lighthouse in New York City, at 03:00, 37 minutes and 02 seconds (French time) Francis Joyon beat his previous record by 49 minutes. The World Speed ​​Sailing Record Council will burn the time of 5 days, 2 hours, 7 minutes, on its shelves *. ” It was right ” just pointed out the sailor of Locmariaquer after a hard night, chanted by many maneuvers and gybes to reach the western tip of England. “I was happy to arrive because the last 24 hours have been very trying,” continues the king of the Atlantic. “My autopilots functioning badly, I had to bar permanently these last 24 hours,

Francis Joyon on IDEC SPORT in NYC on July 4, 2017 (Photo © George Bekris)

At 61, Francis Joyon realizes a new maritime, physical and sporting feat, in a totally unprecedented context for a record of this scale. ” I left New York in a hurry, ” he says. ” I did not even have time to take care of the bunkering. I just could buy some eggs and bananas. As for food on board, the guys (sic) had eaten everything during the crossing of The Bridge 2017. ”

Francis Joyon ( Photo Pierrick Contin / DPPI / IDEC )

Ad-hoc weather window point studied for a long time since the earth with the help of professional routers. Joyon had to do with what the Atlantic had to offer this Thursday evening July 6th. ” The weather was not good and all day one, I pulled up the wind edges. But the next day, a system was set up. I then saw the Queen Mary 2 returning to Europe. I thought that since we had not been able to beat him on the outward journey from Saint-Nazaire, I might be able to arrive in Brittany before he joined Southampton. (Where it is expected tomorrow Thursday ndlr). I got caught up in the game and attacked. I spent two days at more than 30 knots all the time. I feared the arrival on Europe because the wind was blowing from the North East. But the Azores anticyclone had the good idea to go up a bit and allow me to land in the Channel with southwest winds. ”

New York’s “tear-away” party, Joyon also discovered his own IDEC SPORT maxi trimaran. ” I did a lot of stupid things when I sent gennakers, because I used to sit on superstars at the Jules Verne Trophy. In fact, it is as if I were going back to school to relearn the A-ba of the boat. Fortunately, it is very tolerant, even at 30 knots … “

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT ( Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

Francis Joyon, who is satisfied with the task accomplished, will agree a few minutes of sleep this morning, while making his way to his home port of La trinité sur Mer, which he hopes to rally as soon as possible …

  • Pending ratification by WSSRC

Maxi Trimaran IDEC SPORT (Photo by George Bekris)

 

#FrancisJoyon #IDECSPORT #THEBRIDGE2017 #record #transatlantic #Joyon #NorthAtlantic

 

Photo © Thierry Martinez / THE BRIDGE

 

The Centennial Transat – The Bridge – from Saint-Nazaire to New York started in uniquely spectacular fashion at 19:00 today, one hundred years after American troops arrived on the coast of France. 

This time the cannon shots were sounds of fraternity to begin the race between the Queen Mary 2 and four of the largest and fastest trimarans in the world. The start to ocean races are always emotive affairs but rarely are they so loaded.

On Saturday, many thousands lined the harbor and shore to welcome the Queen Mary 2 into the Brittany harbor where she was built. This Loire estuary was alive again as the only remaining ocean liner in the world weighed anchor and the four trimarans, equally impressive in their class, set sail in light airs under a cloudless sky.

The trimarans were unsurprisingly faster off the mark, but the Queen Mary 2 (1,132 feet/345m) is a very big favourite to the win 3,152-mile (5,837 km) transat and her arrival under the Verrazano Bridge in New York is expected at 08:00 on Saturday, July 1. The crewed “Ultime” class trimarans – Macif (François Gabart), Idec Sport (Francis Joyon), Sodebo Ultim’ (Thomas Coville) and Team Actual, (Yves Le Blévec) – which are all over 25 meters long, are expected to finish between one and two days later. As forecast, because the race is against the prevailing winds, the trimarans will be working their way upwind to the north, while the QM2 can power direct to New York.

“Initially, the wind will be very soft in the Saint-Nazaire channel. The small windshift from north-west with winds of less than 10 knots expected in the evening won’t allow for much flying,” Dominic Vittet, the race meteorologist said. “As soon as the trimarans have left the Grand Carpentier lighthouse (in Saint-Nazaire) to starboard, they will already have to make a crucial choice about how they round the anticyclonic ridge that has the Bay of Biscay under lockdown and is forming a wall that will be difficult to cross in the first 24 hours.”

The fleet includes the cream of French sailing – who continue to dominate this class and offshore sailing in general – both on the trimarans and on the QM2, where Jean Le Cam, Alain Gautier and Bruno Peyron, gave the official start from the bridge. There is only one Briton among the 22 sailors across the four boats, Samantha Davies, who is also the only woman. The 34-year-old Gabart and crew start as favourites to set a new reference time between these two cities. The 30-metre long Macif, launched in 2015, is the newest boat of the four and Gabart has already proved its pace by winning the TheTransat bakerly in 2016. But the older hands, Joyon and Coville, have so many oceanic records between them that they can never be discounted.

For more information, photos and videos:
www.thebridge2017.com

The Bridge is a transatlantic celebration of friendship and solidarity between France and the United States, marking one hundred years since the arrival of American soldiers on French shores in 1917 to join the Allies in World War I. It includes:

– the 4th FIBA 3X3 World Cup in Nantes (17-21 June)
– the return of the Queen Mary 2 to where it was constructed in Saint-Nazaire, escorted by an international armada (June 24)
– the Centennial Transat to New York (June 25-July 3)
– an original tribute across the ocean to a century of American music (June 23-July 1)

 © JM Liot / DPPI / IDEC SPORT

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

The World Speed Sailing Record Council has ratified three intermediate records set by IDEC SPORT

After ratifying the extraordinary performance of the maxi-trimaran IDEC SPORT sailed by Francis Joyon, Alex Pella, Bernard Stamm, Clément Surtel, Gwénolé Gahinet and Sébastien Audigane around the world, the World Speed Sailing Record Council, the international body, which certifies major sailing records, has just officially recorded three new intermediate records achieved along the way.
Indian Ocean record between Cape Agulhas and Tasmania, which already belonged to Francis Joyon and his men, was shattered by more than a day between 29th December 2016 and 4th January. It now stands at 5 days, 21 hours, 7 minutes and 45 seconds.

IDEC SPORT also slashed almost a day off the South Pacific record set by Bruno Peyron and the maxi catamaran, Orange in 2005 (8 days, 18 hours and 8 minutes). Joyon and his crew took just 7 days, 21 hours, 13 minutes and 31 seconds to sail the distance between Tasmania and Cape Horn.
Finally, the intermediate reference time between the Equator on the way down and the Equator on the way back now stands at 29 days, 9 hours, 10 minutes and 55 seconds, replacing the time set by Loïck Peyron aboard the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V of 32 days, 11 hours and 52 minutes.
As a reminder, the time of 40 days, 23 hours, 30 minutes and 30 seconds is now the outright round the world record from Ushant to Ushant via the three major capes, Good Hope, Leeuwin and the Horn, referred to as the Jules Verne Trophy record.
The WSSRC has recorded the following reference times:
Dates: from 16th December 2016, start at 0819hrs UTC, to 26th January 2017 at 07:49:30 UTC.
The international body recorded an average speed of 21.96 knots over the theoretical distance of 21,600 miles.
Francis Joyon and his men actually sailed 26,412 miles out on the water, at an average speed of 26.85 knots.
They shattered the previous record held by Loïck Peyron and the crew of the maxi trimaran Banque Populaire V by four days, 14 hours, 12 minutes and 23 seconds.
 Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Training for the maxi tri IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, and his crew, prior to their circumnavigation crew record attempt for Trophy Jules Verne, off Belle Ile, on october 12, 2016 – Photo Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

© Jean-Sebastien Evrard, AFP | French skipper Thomas Coville navigates aboard the Sodebo Ultim’ on October 12 off La Trinite-sur-Mer in western France

© Jean-Sebastien Evrard, AFP | French skipper Thomas Coville navigates aboard the Sodebo Ultim’ on October 12 off La Trinite-sur-Mer in western France

New Record : 49 days 3 hours 7 minutes and 38 seconds!

France’s Thomas Coville set a new round-the-world solo sailing record of just 49 days on Sunday, beating the previous world record by more than eight days.

Coville arrived at the finish line in Ushant, an island in the southwestern English Channel, at 5:57pm local time after a solo round-the-world trip that took just 49 days, 3 hours, 7 minutes and 38 seconds.

Coville slashed eight days off the world record when he ended his astonishing non-stop journey aboard the Sodebo Ultim’ on Christmas Day. The previous record of 57 days, 13 hours, 34 minutes and 6 seconds was established by another Frenchman, Francis Joyon, in 2008.

 Colville, who was sailing a 31-metre maxi trimaran, would rarely have slept for more than 30 minutes at a time during the race, remaining on constant alert for danger and changing conditions.

Coville set off from Brest on the Brittany coast on November 6. He needed to make it back by January 3 to set a new record.

In 2008, Joyon broke British sailor Ellen MacArthur’s previous record of 71 days, 14 hours and 18 minutes of February 2005. Her Australian-constructed, 23-metre trimaran had been specifically designed to accommodate her diminutive stature of 5 feet, 2 inches (1.57 metres).

Maxi Trimaran Sodebo skippered by Thomas Coville ( Photo © Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / Sodebo )

Maxi Trimaran Sodebo skippered by Thomas Coville ( Photo © Jean-Marie Liot / DPPI / Sodebo )