The Transat bakery. Prologue. St Malo. France Pictures of Loïck Peyron (FRA) onboard the classic yacht Pen Duick II on which he will complete the solo transatlantic race Image licensed to Lloyd Images/ OC Sports

The Transat bakery. Prologue. St Malo. France.  Loïck Peyron (FRA) onboard the classic yacht Pen Duick II.   Image licensed to Lloyd Images/ OC Sports

Today Loïck Peyron, skipper of Pen Duick II, informed The Transat bakerly Race Management that his nostalgic voyage from Plymouth to New York had come to an end following damage to his staysail which has torn off the bridge of his boat.

Peyron reported: “Hello. Staysail plate torn off the bridge, but no problem. Unfortunately I can not continue into the wind, so for the moment I am proceeding on Quiberon Envsn. Loïck.”

Strong winds and crashing waves have played havoc with The Transat bakerly racing fleet over recent days, and Peyron’s recently restored vintage wooden ketch is the latest boat to feel the wrath of the North Atlantic.

The Transat Bakerly yacht race. The start of solo transatlantic race start from Plymouth UK  - New York. USA. Image licensed to Lloyd Images

The Transat Bakerly yacht race. The start of solo transatlantic race start from Plymouth UK – New York. USA. Image licensed to Lloyd Images

Sailing over 3050nm ‘the old way’ as a tribute to the achievements of double Transat winner Eric Tabarly and sailing legend Mike Birch, triple Transat winner Peyron will now divert to Quiberon l’Ecole Nationale de Voile (ENVSN) in France midway through his voyage, no longer able to sail his boat into the wind.

This downwind delivery back to Quiberon ENVSN, where Pen Duick II has been owned and used as part of the sailing school for nearly 50 years, should take the skipper around 10 days to complete.

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NEW YORK, NY - MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the 'Transat Bakerley' solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the ‘Transat Bakerley’ solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

Francois Gabart, the young heart-throb of French solo offshore sailing, completed his first solo win on board his new 100ft trimaran, Macif, today when he crossed the finish line off New York.

The 33-year-old Frenchman, who in 2013 became the youngest ever winner of the Vendée Globe solo round-the-world race, sailed a brilliant race from Plymouth, covering the official distance of 3,050 nautical miles in 8 days, 8 hours, 54 minutes and 39 seconds. He narrowly missed out on a new race record, which was set by Michel Desjoyeaux in 2004, and still stands at a time of 8 days, 8 hours, 29 minutes.

Gabart actually sailed a total distance of 4,634 miles at an average speed of 23.11 knots in a remarkable voyage that, unusually for The Transat bakerly, took him and his close rival Thomas Coville on Sodebo, hundreds of miles south of the Azores into the tradewinds before sling-shotting northwest up to New York.

His beautiful blue, white and yellow Van Peteghem Lauriot-Prevost-designed multihull, in which Gabart hopes to set a new outright solo round-the-world record, reached the finish at 18:24 local time in New York, as recorded by the Sandy Hook Pilot Association boat, with its jubilant skipper waving to his team support boat as he crossed the line.

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the 'Transat Bakerley' solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the ‘Transat Bakerley’ solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

Shortly afterwards Gabart reflected on a race that, for much of the time, saw him in close company with Coville on the older Sodebo. For the first three days the two skippers were never more than a few miles apart, having crossed the Bay of Biscay in sight of each other.

The competition with Thomas on Sodebo was wonderful. It made the race incredible for me.  We are working together to organise more races for these type of boats, and when we see what happened in The Transat bakerly, and how close the competition was, we know there is a place for it. This is just the beginning of the journey.”

Gabart clearly loved his first outing on his new mile-munching ocean-racing thoroughbred, and he more than stepped up to the challenge that the 30-metre giant posed. “It was a big challenge for me. You should have 10 or 15 people to manage these boats, and it’s just me. It was my first solo race on Macif, and I didn’t know if I was able to do it, so I am really proud of what I did.

“To arrive into New York was perfect. The boat is in good shape. Me? Well, maybe not! I’m very tired, but I’m incredibly proud.”

As winner of the Ultime class, Gabart will be presented with a special watch from The Transat bakerly official timekeeper Ralf Tech.

Commenting on Gabart’s performance, The Transat bakerly Event Director Herve Favre said: “Francois and Thomas put on an amazing show at the front of the fleet and Francois has emerged a worthy and deserving winner. Over the next week we will see the winners of the IMOCA 60, Multi50 and Class40s emerge and each winner will be a hero in my book.”

The Big Apple has only been used once before in the race as the finish port and that was in the very first edition in 1960 when the winner, one Sir Francis Chichester on the monohull Gipsy Moth III, was at sea for 40 days, 12 hours 30 minutes. Sailing a multihull from a different century, Gabart was 32 days, 3 hours and 36 minutes quicker than the British legend.

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the 'Transat Bakerley' solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the ‘Transat Bakerley’ solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

As Gabart crossed the line Coville was still some 118nm from the finish while the third-placed trimaran in the Ultime class – Actual skippered by Yves Le Blevec – was still 509.6nm away.

For the other classes in the fleet, the finish line is still over 800 miles away. Armel Le Cléac’h (Banque Populaire) continues to lead the IMOCA 60 fleet with an anticipated arrival time of 19:00 local time on Friday. Vincent Riou on PRB is 76 miles behind and still hot on his stern.

In the four-boat Multi50 class, Gilles Lamiré (Frenchtech Rennes St Malo) is continuing to extend his lead, with a 219 mile advantage between him and the chasing Lalou Roucayrol (Arkema).

Trading places at the top of the Class40 fleet is Isabelle Joschke (Generali–Horizon Mixité) and Thibaut Vauchel-Camus (Solidaires en Peloton–Arsep), with Joschke currently holding a six-mile advantage.

On Tuesday Armel Tripon on Black Pepper announced his retirement from The Transat bakerly, after he sustained damage in the week’s earlier storms, leaving eight Class40s now en route to the Big Apple.

Track the race here.

The class rankings at 20:00 BST – updated every four hours. 

ULTIME
1. Francois Gabart/Macif – Finished after 8 days, 8 hours, 54 minutes and 39 seconds
2. Thomas Coville/Sodebo – 88.21nm from the finish
3. Yves Le Blevec/Actual – 504.50nm from the finish

IMOCA 60
1. Armel Le Cléac’h/Banque Populaire – 857.2nm from the finish
2. Vincent Riou/PRB – 76.10nm from the leader
3. Jean-Pierre Dick/St Michel Virbac – 182.74nm from the leader

MULTI50
1. Gilles Lamiré/French Tech Rennes St Malo – 950nm from the finish
2. Lalou Roucayrol/Arkema – 219.62nm from the leader
3. Pierre Antoine/Olmix – 415.94nm from the leader

CLASS40
1. Isabelle Joschke/Generali Horizon Mixité – 1421.3nm from the finish
2. Thibaut Vauchel-Camus/Solidaires en Peloton – ARSEP – 6.60nm from the leader
3. Phil Sharp/Imerys – 18.59nm from the leader

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the 'Transat Bakerley' solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 10: Francois Gabart on board his MACIF ‘Ultim’ 105ft trimaran, shown here celebrating after winning the ‘Transat Bakerley’ solo transatlantic yacht race. The yachtsman set a new world record for the solo transatlantic crossing in 8 days, 8 hours 54 minutes and 39 seconds. The race started in Plymouth, UK on Monday May 3rd. May 10, 2016 on the Hudson River in New York City. (Photo by Lloyd Images)

Emirates Team New Zealand (Photo © George Bekris)

 

In a thrilling winner-take-all final race, Emirates Team New Zealand unhooked itself from a starting buoy to win the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series New York with the high score of 52 points.

Another large crowd, estimated at 100,000, turned out on a sunny day and was treated to some very unpredictable racing. This after over 75,000 came out on Saturday.

Watch a recap here

 

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

No lead was ever safe on Sunday as the wind shifted through wide arcs from the west to the north and ranged anywhere from 5 to 20 knots.

“It was one of those series where everyone had good luck and bad luck, but we got our good luck at the end of the regatta,” said Emirates Team New Zealand skipper Glenn Ashby. “It was exciting and crazy at the same time. Today it was important to keep your cool and stay focused.”

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

The Kiwi crew, led by Ashby and World Sailor of the year and Red Bull Youth America’s Cup champion helmsman Peter Burling, was literally dead in the water at the start of Race 3. Crewman Blair Tuke had to jump in the water to unhook the starting buoy’s anchor line from the catamaran’s rudder. Making matters worse, the port hull was punctured by the buoy and water was leaking into the hull throughout the race.

“We saw the buoy coming at us with about 20 seconds to go,” said Ashby. “It wasn’t ideal but we were lucky in the end.”

 

The Kiwi crew’s luck came full circle on the next-to-last leg. They rounded the last windward mark in fifth place, about 42 seconds behind leading SoftBank Team Japan. But as all the crews began the downwind leg they sailed into a patch of no wind that engulfed the course.

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

As the leg was perpendicular to the southerly flowing current, some of the crews were being swept over the course boundary. Land Rover BAR, Groupama Team France and SoftBank Team Japan all were penalized for crossing the boundary in the current.

The Kiwis, further behind, held in the middle of the course and when the wind filled in the Kiwis took off on their hydrofoils at 16 to 20 knots boatspeed, leaving the rest of the fleet gasping in disbelief.

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

At one point during the final race ORACLE TEAM USA looked to be in position to win. Skipper Jimmy Spithill and crew won the start and led around the first two mark roundings. But Dean Barker’s SoftBank Team Japan grabbed the lead by working the right side of the course while ORACLE TEAM USA struggled on the right side. In the end the reigning America’s Cup champion placed second in the race and second for the series.

“The crowd was insane,” said Spithill. “Today was great for the fans. In these conditions you have to roll with the punches and keep fighting. We wanted to win but we’ll take the second place. The Kiwis got a Hail Mary there at the end, but you have to take your hat off to them and congratulate them.”

Third went to Franck Cammas’ Groupama Team France, winner of Race 2. SoftBank Team Japan placed fourth, Land Rover BAR fifth and Artemis Racing sixth.

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

Illustrating just how challenging the day was on the short, confined racecourse, Nathan Outteridge’s crew won the first race going away but was then sixth in Races 2 and 3.

“We got a little bit of luck in the first race and managed to hold on, but we had some terrible moments in the last two races…” said Outteridge. “You can’t get people to come watch sailing if you don’t bring it to them. That’s what we’ve done here. When the America’s Cup is in Bermuda next year, in super high-tech boats, we’ll get some amazing racing.”

The Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series now moves onto Chicago, June 10-12. After that it heads to Europe for events in the U.K. in July and France in September.

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series New York Final Standings

1. Emirates Team New Zealand – 52 points
2. ORACLE TEAM USA – 50 points
3. Groupama Team France – 44 points
4. SoftBank Team Japan – 42 points
5. Land Rover BAR – 42 points
6. Artemis Racing – 40 points

 

Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series Overall Standings
(After six events)

1. Emirates Team New Zealand – 244 points
2. ORACLE TEAM USA – 236 points
3. Land Rover BAR – 227 points
4. SoftBank Team Japan – 203 points
5. Artemis Racing – 201 points
6. Groupama Team France – 194 points

 

Photo © George Bekris

Photo © George Bekris

 

The Seven Star Round Britain and Ireland, race start.Cowes. Isle of Wight. Oman Sail MOD70 trimaran skippered by Sidney Gavignet (FRA) (Photo by Mark Lloyd/Lloyd Images)

The Seven Star Round Britain and Ireland, race start. Cowes. Isle of Wight. Oman Sail MOD70 trimaran skippered by Sidney Gavignet (FRA) (Photo by Mark Lloyd/Lloyd Images)

Musandam-Oman Sail, the Sultanate of Oman’s flagship trimaran, will join a small fleet of MOD70s at the start of the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s classic Round Ireland Race on 18 June to kick off the European season.

Sidney Gavignet, Skipper Oman Sail Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Sidney Gavignet, Skipper Oman Sail Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

French skipper Sidney Gavignet’s crew of Omani sailors and Irishman Damian Foxall are no strangers to the 700 mile Round Ireland race track having famously smashed the record in 2015 after completing the course in 40 hours, 51 minutes and 57 seconds, some four hours faster than anything achieved previously.

Fahad Al Hasni, Yasser Al Rahbi and Sami Al Shukaili were all on board for the record-breaking voyage and all return to action for the Round Ireland Race.

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

The team has developed a strong bond, says Gavignet so the prospect of lining up against other professional MOD70 crews in June for the start in Wicklow, to follow a course that leaves Ireland and all its islands excluding Rockall to starboard, serves to stir their competitive spirits.

“This Omani crew has a long history – last season especially was very demanding – so we have a very good team with a great team spirit,” said skipper Gavignet.

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

“We would like to win the race but know it will not be easy because the other MOD70s have been sailing a lot in the past few months. We have trained hard and the guys are performing at a different level now so we are very happy to go and do our best against the others.

“We hold the record but it is possible to do better and it is likely that whoever wins will set a new record, depending on the conditions. It is very exciting to be racing against Phaedo and Concise – it will be a good contest.”

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Preparations for the race have included some intensive training offshore as well as participation in the Grand Prix Guyader in Douarnenez, France, last weekend where the Omani Diam 24 team onboard Oman Airports by Oman Sail finished in 3rd place.

This weekend MOD70 sailors Fahad, Sami and Yasser are due to compete on Oman Sail’s J80 at the Grand Prix Ecole Navale at the French Naval Academy in Lanvéoc to get some crucial fleet race practice.

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Success in sailing against the clock for a speed record requires a different mindset to racing in a fleet, said Fahad, Oman’s most experienced and successful offshore sailor.

“Competing with other boats in the Round Ireland race will be different to breaking the record and probably a lot more difficult,” he said.

“The other MOD70s have been training and racing all year and have achieved some good results so they will be hard to beat. But we will be sailing the boat as fast as we can and if we can win, it will be fantastic for us because this is a two thirds Omani crew.”

Records are one thing but when you get two boats racing side by side, the results speak for themselves, commented Damian Foxall, acknowledged as Ireland’s most accomplished ocean sailor.

Damian Foxall ,Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

Damian Foxall ,Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

“This season, our campaigns are all about fleet racing. When you are racing against the clock, you never know if you are performing 100% but in fleet racing, if you are not going 100%, you probably aren’t winning. And you know pretty quickly whether you have taken a good or bad option.

“Fleet racing is more like a game of chess and what the other boats do on the course can affect your own tactics. So you have to be on your game 100% all the time and sail a lot harder. Our guys understand that completely.”

A couple of years ago, Musandam-Oman Sail would have been favourite to win the multihull class, Foxall continued but an upsurge in activity on the other MOD70s means they have a contest on their hands.

“The guys on Phaedo and Concise are sailing extremely well now so a couple of years ago, we might have been favourites but that is certainly no longer the case and we are going to have to compete really hard to get a result this year. But we know how to sail the boat so this is great and exactly how it should be.”

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Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

 

To stay up to date: www.omansail.com

For more information on the race, please go to: http://roundireland.ie/wp/

 

Oman Sail Crew Mark Lloyd

Oman Sail Crew on Musandam (Photo © Mark Lloyd/ Lloyd Images)

SAILING - THE ARTEMIS TRANSAT - START - PLYMOUTH (GBR) - 11/05/08 PHOTO : VINCENT CURUTCHET / DPPI / THE ARTEMIS TRANSAT / OC EVENTS START

SAILING – THE ARTEMIS TRANSAT – START – PLYMOUTH (GBR) – 11/05/08
PHOTO : VINCENT CURUTCHET / DPPI / THE ARTEMIS TRANSAT / OC EVENTS
START

In just under 100 days time, a growing fleet of first-class ocean racers and fearless adventurers will set sail on the world’s oldest solo transatlantic race from Plymouth to New York – The Transat.

This year’s race has attracted a star-studded line up of offshore greats, from the likes of Vendée Globe competitors Sébastien Josse and Armel Le Cléac’h in the IMOCA60, to Transat Jacques Vabre winner Erwan Le Roux and Route du Rhum winner Thomas Coville on the flying multihulls and seasoned offshore competitors Miranda Merron and Thibaut Vauchel in the Class40.

The Transat is a nostalgic race steeped in history, full of adventure and touched upon by tragedy. Established in 1960 by Sir Francis Chichester and Blondie Hasler, Hasler’s legendary vision for the race is still as relevant today as it was then – The Transat is about “one man, one boat, one ocean.”

But while the principle behind the race remains the same, a new generation of ocean racing machines sees a classic reborn in 2016. Giant Ultimes, flying Multi50s, powerful IMOCA60s and hardy Class40s, helmed by some of the world’s finest solo sailors, could make for one of the fastest crossings yet.

“We are absolutely delighted by the turn out and the calibre of the skippers who are taking on the challenge of one of the greatest solo races in the sport,” said Hervé Favre, Offshore Events Director for OC Sport. “With the right conditions we could see records tumbling in all four classes.”

Paying homage to The Transat’s origins, the 14th edition will set sail from Plymouth – the first city to play host to the race. From Plymouth breakwater, the fleet will race 3,000 miles to Brooklyn in New York, where The Transat first finished 56 years ago.

Between the two cities, competitors will be alone faced with the towering waves of the Atlantic, blinding fog, ferocious winds and the danger of ice drifting down from the Arctic. The fleet will spend anywhere between eight and 18 days at sea, dependent on the boat. Racing upwind for the majority of the race, The Transat will be a hard slog for the skippers. Frequent rest, good nutrition and staying hydrated will be key to staving off fatigue and staying in the game.

The Atlantic is a dangerous playground and intelligent sailing will be the key to success in New York City, as Race Director Gilles Chiorri explained: “The Transat is the mother of all transatlantic races, it launched the trend for solo sailing. The Transat is the most challenging transatlantic to win. The race will be characterised by the low pressures and stormy conditions associated with heavy swell, sometimes within the vicinity of icebergs. The winner in each class (Ultime, IMOCA60, Multi 50, Class40) will step on the path of the previous winners, including Chichester, Tabarly, Colas, Poupon, Desjoyeaux, Joyon, and Loick Peyron, among others.”

With less than 100 days to the start of this epic, The Transat boasts an international fleet of almost 30 boats including three Ultimes, five Multi 50s, seven IMOCA 60s, 11 Class40s, two female skippers, two Brits, 21 French entries, one German and The Transat’s first Japanese entry.

You can read more into the colourful history of The Transat here and see the announced competitor line up below.

Entries for the 2016 Transat are open until 31st January. To enter, please click here.

Follow The Transat on Facebook, Twitter and find more on our website

 

The Transat 2016 will finish in New York (Photo© FreeImages.com/Dario Lucarini)

The Transat 2016 will finish in New York (Photo© FreeImages.com/Dario Lucarini)

 

DECEMBER 07: Americas Cup Trophy in New York City. (Photo by Rob Tringali / America's Cup)

DECEMBER 07: Americas Cup Trophy in New York City. (Photo by Rob Tringali / America’s Cup)

 

America’s Cup racing will return to New York for the first time since 1920 with Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series racing on May 7-8, 2016.

The New York event is one of six events planned during 2016, each featuring thrilling, high-speed competition, as six America’s Cup teams, with the top sailors in the world, vie for points that count towards the final competition for the 35th America’s Cup in 2017.

Watch the video here

This year, Emirates Team New Zealand’s star helmsman, Peter Burling, the youngest in the fleet, led his team to the top of the standings over current America’s Cup champion Jimmy Spithill’s ORACLE TEAM USA, and the highly touted Land Rover BAR team led by Olympic hero Ben Ainslie.

But the competition was close. In fact, the opening three Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series events in 2015 featured three different event winners, and four different individual race winners. The 2016 calendar promises more hard-fought racing on the foiling AC45F catamarans that fly above the water.

“Everyone is going to want to start the New Year off well,” said ORACLE TEAM USA skipper Jimmy Spithill. “But all the other teams have been out training with the same goal in mind, so nothing will come easy this year.

“The New York event is going to be spectacular. Racing on the lower Hudson River, in front of that Manhattan skyline, will be a huge hit. New Yorkers are massive sports fans and I think this will be something very special: thrilling, top-level racing right in the heart of the city. It’s going to be a great event for the America’s Cup and a great event for New York.”

Practice racing in New York is on May 6, with point-scoring races on the weekend of May 7-8.

Four events on the 2016 schedule have been announced to date:

Muscat, Oman – February 26-28, 2016; 
New York, USA – May 6-8, 2016;
Chicago, USA – June 10-12, 2016;
Portsmouth, UK – July 22-24, 2016;

Two additional Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series events are anticipated to complete the calendar, likely in Europe in mid-September and in Asia in mid-November.

“With six events around the world in 2016 our fans will have more opportunities to enjoy America’s Cup racing and follow their favorite teams and sailors as we build towards the finals in Bermuda in 2017,” said Harvey Schiller, the Commercial Commissioner of the America’s Cup.

“We’re excited to be able to add the new venues of Oman, New York and Chicago to the calendar, giving more fans a chance to experience the America’s Cup in person.”

The New York event is an historic milestone of sorts. America’s Cup racing was held in New York harbor and environs for 50 years, representing the first 13 challenges for the oldest trophy in international sport.

From 1870 through 1920 racing took place off New York. Beginning in 1930, the competition was moved to Newport, Rhode Island, where it remained until the United States finally lost the Cup in 1983, ending the longest winning streak in sport.

Since that time, racing for the America’s Cup has taken place in Perth (Australia); San Diego (USA); Auckland (New Zealand); Valencia (Spain); and San Francisco (USA).

In May/June 2017, the next America’s Cup will be raced for in Bermuda.

Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series standings (after three events):

Emirates Team New Zealand – 122 points
ORACLE TEAM USA – 112 points
Land Rover BAR – 109 points
Artemis Racing – 105 points
SoftBank Team Japan – 100 points
Groupama Team France – 82 points

About the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series New York

This event will take place from May 6-8, 2016, with official practice racing on the Friday and point-scoring races on Saturday and Sunday.

The Event Village will be in the Brookfield Place Waterfront Plaza, while the racing will be on the lower Hudson River off the Battery Park City Esplanade (between the Pier 25 basin to the north and The Battery to the south).

The technical areas for teams, race management and America’s Cup TV production will be based at Liberty State Park and Liberty Landing Marina, across the Hudson River in New Jersey.

About the America’s Cup

The America’s Cup is the oldest trophy in international sport, dating back to 1851, when the yacht America, after which the trophy is named, beat the best of the British fleet in a race around the Isle of Wight, U.K. The trophy won on that day was donated in trust through a Deed of Gift and has since become a symbol of immense achievement. It is perhaps the hardest trophy in sport to win. In it’s 165-year history, only four countries have managed to win the America’s Cup.

The America’s Cup is currently held by the Golden Gate Yacht Club in San Francisco, U.S.A.. On September 25, 2013, its team, ORACLE TEAM USA, completed the biggest comeback in sports to retain the trophy it had first won in 2010.

On December 2, 2014, Bermuda was named as the home of the 35th America’s Cup, with the iconic Great Sound as the race course area where the new America’s Cup Class boats (15-meter, foiling, wing-sailed catamarans) from each competing nation will race for the America’s Cup in May/June 2017.

The America’s Cup is honored to partner with Louis Vuitton as the title partner of the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series, the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup Qualifiers and the Louis Vuitton America’s Cup Challenger Playoffs. Louis Vuitton is also the presenting partner of the 35th America’s Cup Match, presented by Louis Vuitton.

The America’s Cup is also proud to be supported by BMW, Bremont, ORACLE, Sail Racing, the Bermuda Tourism Authority, Gosling’s and XL Catlin; as well as: Appleby, BF&M, Butterfield, Butterfield & Vallis, Moët & Chandon, PwC and the Hamilton Princess & Beach Club.

America’s Cup updates are also available on your mobile device. Go to the App Store to download the official America’s Cup App.

For more America’s Cup and Louis Vuitton America’s Cup World Series racing visit The America’s Cup Website

ONEº15 B​rooklyn ​Bridge M​arina

ONEº15 B​rooklyn ​Bridge M​arina

 

Prestigious race returns for the first time in eight years to international sailing calendar and returns to New York for the first time since its 1960 inception

The Transat, the first and oldest single-handed trans-ocean race in history, is heading to New York City and will culminate at the new ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina, race organisers and rights holders OC Sport, announced today.

The marina will be an Official Host Venue Partner to the race alongside Plymouth, UK and is located in the heart of Brooklyn Bridge Park opposite Manhattan. It’s the newest marina to be built in New York City and is currently under construction with a grand opening set for Spring 2016 to be marked by this iconic and exciting race.

“We are thrilled to kick off our grand opening season by hosting the finish of this iconic and historic sailing race,” said Arthur Tay, Chairman of SUTL Group, the majority owner of the Brooklyn marina and the visionary behind the ONE°15 Marina brand.

“Our goal in designing this marina was to offer an unparalleled level of access to the water for the local Brooklyn community, New Yorkers, and boating enthusiasts from around the globe. The prestigious Transat race will certainly bring a wide audience to the waterfront in Brooklyn and solidify its place as a sought-after international sailing destination.”ONEº15 B​rooklyn ​Bridge M​arina

It seems only natural that the city that never sleeps should host this race. As many involved in sailing will know, there is no predicting what time the boats will arrive, so at least we can count on New York to be awake should the skippers dock in at 4am.

“We are extremely happy to announce ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina as our Host Venue Partner for The Transat’s exciting finish,” said Hervé Favre, The Transat’s Event Director.

“The marina will have many promising features but a key one for us, as organisers, is that the entire fleet will be able to stay together in one place, which I believe is unprecedented in New York for a multi classes event including giant multihulls. This is a game-changer for New York Harbour, and I believe The Transat will be the first of many races to come to this state-of-the art marina,” added Favre.

The Transat charts a course from Plymouth in the United Kingdom to New York, a dangerous route that tests the best single-handed sailors in the world to their limits. Returning for the first time in eight years, the race is set to cement its status as one of the most important and prestigious events on the international sailing calendar.

The Transat is scheduled to depart from Plymouth on the 2nd May 2016 with ONEº15 Brooklyn Marina expecting the first boat around the 9th May. There are four classes of boats in the race, the fastest of which are some of the most spectacular multihulls in world sailing.

The race has not visited New York since its first year in 1960 and makes it first triumphant return to the city at this new state-of-the-art marina. ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina is ideally located between Piers 4 and 5 in the lush and beautiful Brooklyn Bridge Park, an 85‐acre sustainable waterfront park stretching 1.3 miles along Brooklyn’s East River shoreline. The creation of the marina furthers the Park’s mission of making the waterfront more accessible to the public.

The Transat promises astonishing sporting performances and fascinating stories of human drama as the skippers take on the North Atlantic on one of the most treacherous routes known to sailing.

The Notice of Race is now available and entries are open for teams interested in competing. Please visit www.thetransat.com for more information.

 

About The Transat

The OSTAR (Observer Singlehanded Trans-Atlantic Race) was created in 1960 by a handful of pioneering sailors. The race was organised every four years by the Royal Western Yacht Club (RWYC) from 1960 through to the 2000 event, albeit with a lot of involvement from the French event organiser Pen Duick in the 90s, in order to cater for the demands of the professional campaigns that dominated the event. After the 2000 edition, OC Sport stepped in to develop the event and acquired the rights to the professional part. OC Sport organised The Transat in 2004 and 2008, the 2012 edition was deferred at the request of IMOCA (the largest competing class).

The RWYC continues to organise a solo transatlantic race for Corinthian and non-professional sailors that is still known as the (O)STAR,. This race usually falls a year after the professional big boat race i.e. 2005, 2009, 2013, 2017. Both the amateur Yacht Club event and The Transat have the right to link to the history of the original race created in 1960, and to the rich history it has produced.

The first race was competed by just a handful of pioneering sailors including Francis Chichester and Blondie Hasler who coined the phrase: “One man, one boat, the ocean.” There has been tragedy, dramatic rescues and exceptional drama since the race began in 1960. Over time The Transat, as it is known today, has evolved and now serves the professional end of offshore sailing. But there are few modern day races that can reflect on such a long and outstanding history.

Monohull IMOCA 60 record: 12 days, 11 hours and 45 minutes set by Loick Peyron (FRA) on board Gitana in 2008. Multihull 60ft record: 8 days, 8 hours, 29 minutes set by Michel Desjoyeaux (FRA) on board Géant in 2004.

OC Sport is a global sports marketing and events company specialising in professional sailing and outdoor events ranging from running, cycling and winter sports. OC Sport organise the award-winning and original stadium racing event, the Extreme Sailing Series; created and manage the Artemis Offshore Academy – the only UK-based training school for solo sailors; and managed the Dongfeng Race Team in the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15. www.ocsport.com

About ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina

ONE°15 Brooklyn Marina, Brooklyn’s gateway to New York Harbor, is a new marina that will offer unparalleled water access to the local Brooklyn community, New Yorkers, and boating enthusiasts from around the globe. Located just south of the Brooklyn Bridge, the Marina will feature an exceptional community program that will make boating and kayaking available to residents of all ages, abilities, and incomes as well as seasonal docking facilities of the highest quality, a Sailing Club & School and a Harbor Club. An integral hub of community activity, primely located along Brooklyn’s resurgent waterfront, this new facility will be a part of the vibrant Brooklyn Bridge Park and offer the calmest marina basin in New York Harbor. A joint venture between majority owner SUTL Group and Edgewater Resources, the marina brings together the US design team responsible for the world’s “greenest marina” and the marina management skills of SUTL which earned ONE°15 Marina Singapore the title of Best Marina and Yacht Club in Asia (2009, 2012-2014). For more information: www.ONE15BrooklynMarina.com

 

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening, prior to Their circumnavigation record Attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 14, 2015 - From left to right: skipper Francis Joyon, Roland Jourdain, Clement Surtel , Gwenole Gahinet Boris Herrmann, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella (Photo by Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening, prior to Their circumnavigation record Attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 14, 2015 – From left to right: skipper Francis Joyon, Roland Jourdain, Clement Surtel , Gwenole Gahinet Boris Herrmann, Bernard Stamm, Alex Pella (Photo by Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC )

 

IDEC SPORT, the new maxi-trimaran, Francis Joyon, was baptized on Wednesday October 14 at La Trinité-sur-mer. The stand-by to try and beat the record for the Jules Verne Trophy starts in two weeks. Joyon took the opportunity to present its crew of five sailors, an onshore router, and an alternate. A very European commando mix of experience and youth was announced as well.  

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening with champagne by skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 14, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC - Patrice Lafargue (Pdt IDEC) and Professor Gerard Saillant

IDEC Sport Maxi Trimaran christening with champagne by skipper Francis Joyon, prior to their circumnavigation record attempt, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, on october 14, 2015 – Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC – Patrice Lafargue (Pdt IDEC) and Professor Gerard Saillant


A story of men …
After a month at the Multiplast yard in Vannes, IDEC SPORT was baptized on Wednesday on the pontoons from its home port: La Trinite-sur-Mer. It was Professor Gérard Saillant, co-founder of the Institute for Brain and Spinal Cord of (ICM), which is the sponsor of this new ride aboard which Francis Joyon and his men will leave in a few weeks at Conquest of the Planet. One goal: try to go round the world sailing in less than 45 days, which amounts to almost halve the clock imagined by Jules Verne for his hero Phileas Fogg …

Who are these men to whom Francis Joyon trusted?  Great sailors, half French, strangers to each other. A very international crew that combines experience and youth. “I only took the skippers,” said Francis to explain that the vessels need to know everything. All will be entrusted with the helm of the largest trimaran. “Unlike most teams provided where there are many specialized marine in one area, we will go with super-versatile aboard IDEC SPORT”. And for good reason: six on board is very little. Only the first winner of the Jules Verne Trophy, Bruno Peyron, had dared to start at five, that was in 1993. Since then, the crew on this record is always between 10 and 14 Marine … it will be necessarily a great human story that will write Francis Joyon and his men around the world this winter. These are men, three French, a Swiss, a Spaniard and a German.

Bernard Stamm Portrait crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Bernard Stamm (SUI) 51

No introduction of this specialist round the world, the only one of IDEC SPORT commando having already won the Jules Verne Trophy (in 2005 aboard the maxi-catamaran Orange 2). Bernard also won a whopping three round the world monohull Twice Around Alone solo and once the Barcelona World Race twice. He also participated three times in the Vendée Globe. This hard hyper talented evil brings its wealth of experience forged over 30 years on all the world’s oceans. Bernard Stamm: “Things have changed since my participation in the Jules Verne Trophy in 2005. The boats are different, the record is harder to take as well. But the principle is always the same: turn as fast as possible around the planet. I think the record is prenable, otherwise I would not be here! ”

 

 

 

 

Gwenole Gahinet portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Gwénolé Gahinet (FRA) 31

The youngest of the team is the son of a legend in ocean racing, alas disappeared: his father Gilles was one of the few to have beaten Eric Tabarly on Transat and have twice won the Solitaire du Figaro. It is also Figaro that “gweno” made a very grand entrance in recent years, winning great results after a first victory on the Mini Transat. Naval architecture engineer, the good head has worked in VPLP, the firm that designed IDEC SPORT. This is his first world tour. Youth, technical knowledge and talent are in his luggage. Gwénolé Gahinet: “I have a lot Orma trimaran sailed and Multi 50 but I still have much to learn about these great multihulls. I open eyes, I record everything. I am very motivated to discover the South Seas is a whole universe that makes you want to be discovered. ”

 

Alex Pella portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Alex Pella (ESP) 42

Born in Barcelona, ​​this dynamic Catalan was first excellent technical preparer giant multihulls – including The Race-before embarking on a remarkable career via the Mini 6.50 (2nd of the Transat), the Class40 (winner Route du Rhum) and everything that floats next big boats, on one or more shells. Fourth in the Barcelona World Race in 2011, he also sailed a lot in multihulls and knows the seas of the Great South. He knows everything. Alex Pella: “I did not hesitate a second when Francis contacted me for the Jules Verne Trophy. This is a great adventure, especially in this configuration with a small crew and boat prowled. This will be my second trip around the world and it will be two times faster than IMOCA 60. ”

 

Clement Surtel portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Clément Surtel (FRA) 36

Nephew of another great sailor – Franck Yves Escoffier– but especially passionate about multihulls, Clement has a huge experience of major general and trimarans IDEC SPORT in particular. He was preparer when it sailed into the hands of Franck Cammas. Besides multiple crews sailing in large (several records with Orange 2 of the Atlantic and including 24 hours), Clement has already participated in two onshore Jules Verne Trophy in 2005 and 2010. This time he sailed! He is very familiar with the boat and its skipper qualities addition, it will be a great help in all technical aspects. Clément Surtel: “I have spent years navigating these great multihulls and that’s it, I’ll have the chance to make my first world tour and getting into the deep end of the South Seas! IDEC is a beautiful SPORT Trusted platform that has been prepared to complete the course in less than 45 days. On board, we will be at the bottom, we’re off to a great transatlantic! ”

 

xxxx portrait, crew member of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, skipper Francis Joyon, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Boris Herrmann (GER) 34

Two world tours and three passages of Cape Horn: Boris Herrmann knows the great wide! It also comes to force the passage Northeast aboard the old IDEC now in the hands of the Chinese Guo Chuan browser. In 2009, he became the first German to win a round the world sailing: the Global Ocean Race. He too is a jack-of-all engineering, all small monohulls to multihulls giants, with great experience of hostility from the southern seas. It is German but it is a “Swiss Army knife” super versatile. Boris Herrmann: “For my third trip around the world, I am delighted to embark on this boat with which I have already sailed this year. Our motivation is very clear: we go to break the record! The next adventure is a plus, premium competition. ”

 

Roland Jourdain (FRA) 51 (replacing)

Great teams always have a luxury joker on the bench. Just in case … here “Bilou”, which will leave if by chance one of the five crew members was stopped in extremis. As Francis Joyon and Bernard Stamm, he is among those who needs no introduction. Heroes of the Vendée Globe, Le Figaro, the Route du Rhum and large multihulls, his enormous experience reassures everyone. Roland Jourdain: “I love being on the water and go further: the Jules Verne Trophy is a challenge that attracts me. I sailed a lot in multi this year. I will be very hot if Francis needs me. And if not, I will endure the guys from Earth. ”

Onshore router Marcel Van Triest (HOLL), 51

Since his den Balearic front of their computers day and night, Marcel Van Triest will be the IDEC SPORT weather guide. The “Flying Dutchman” is one of the best routers in the world. It’s also a great sailor, who has already done five times round the world race! His small annotated drawings will be scrutinized by Francis Joyon several times a day. It will at once try to beat his own record (Banque Populaire in 45 days and a half, it was him) and try to beat his colleague and friend Jean-Yves Bernot will be the Spindrift router 2, the competitor of IDEC SPORT on the Jules Verne Trophy. His extensive knowledge of ice in the south will also be a valuable asset.

Francis Joyon portrait, skipper of Maxi Trimaran IDEC Sport, prior to Their Attempt circumnavigation record, in La Trinite sur Mer, France, was october 13, 2015 - Photo Jean Marie Liot / DPPI / IDEC

Francis Joyon (FRA), 59: the boss

One sailor in the world to have held together the four largest ocean records alone (World Tour, Atlantic, 24 hours, Discovery Route), Francis Joyon thus passes crewed mode for this attempt, on a boat which he had long dreamed. After receiving dozens of candidates, he chose his crew on two main criteria: versatility and motivation. Francis Joyon: “We will go in a spirit of commando. Team members must invest a lot and spend a lot of time on the deck. They know it all and that is precisely what attracts them in this challenge. ”