St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

by  Barby MacGowan

The second day of the Bucket Regatta saw six new winners in six classes after the 38-strong fleet sailed a long “Not So Wiggly” course around and through the smaller islands and prominent rock formations lying to the north and west of St. Barths. Performances turned in by the victors (Unfurled, SPIIP, Axia, Rosehearty, Koo and Hanuman) also translated into new teams atop the leaderboard in four of the five pursuit classes as well as the J Class when cumulative scores were tallied.  
After yesterday’s race around the island, Rosehearty sat in third in Grandes Dames as did Unfurled in Gazelles. Both are defending champions and made a point of saying they were far from being counted out. Unfurled’s victory today put her in second overall, only one point behind yesterday’s leader WinWin, while Rosehearty’s gave her a tied point score with Meteor for first (tie-breaker rules give the nod to Rosehearty) and dropped yesterday’s leader Perseus^3 to third.

 Even with all the “ins and outs” of the course, Rosehearty never put her spinnaker up. “It was pretty windy (18-20 knots), and we had broken our spinnaker earlier in the week, so it was a risk vs. reward thing,” said Rosehearty’s tactician Paul Cayard. “We had good tactics and lay lines, sailed in all the right places and were able to hold everybody off without it.” Cayard saw Perseus^3 deploy its kite and have some problems, which may have contributed to the team’s fourth-place finish. “The angles just weren’t right for us to put it up; it was a little painful to go slow but the right thing to do when racing these boats.”

 Near the end of the race, two boats from another class were ahead of Rosehearty, slowing it down, while Meteor was advancing quickly from behind. “We focused on staying in front of Meteor; otherwise, they were going to pass us and they’d be winning the regatta.” 

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 In Les Voiles Blanche class, Koo also stakes her first-place position on a tied overall point score with yesterday’s leader Q,  while in the Elegantes, P2 trails leader SPIPP by only four points for second, tied on point score with Sojana.

 P2’s tactician Tony Rey said his team spent last night repairing a spinnaker that blew out yesterday, causing the team to start their three-race series with a fifth-place finish. “The pressure is higher when you are dealing with your own adversity,” he said with a chuckle this morning before racing, “but today will be windy and not so wiggly. This is a course that separates the men from the boys. It sounds innocuous and benign, but it’s plenty wiggly for these boats.”

 In Mademoiselles, today’s winner Axia, also a defending champion, is now in third overall, tied in scoring with two others behind her, while Adela stands between her and overall leader Wisp from yesterday. According to Axia’s tactician Robbie Doyle, his team’s seventh yesterday hurt them, but mathematically, it’s still possible for them to win. “Wisp has to make a mistake, but mistakes are made, as we’ve proven,” he said.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 The J Class had a glorious day of sailing, starting off with a thrilling 2.5 nm downwind leg. Yesterday’s leader Velsheda suffered a penalty after the start, clearing the way for Hanuman to lead the entire way around the 26-mile course.

 All to say, there are no runaway winners going into tomorrow’s final day of racing when a race around the island, this time clockwise, will conclude the on-water competition.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

The Bucket Stewards collaborated in 2016 to establish a new criteria for the coveted Bucket Trophy.  With the racing format having changed in recent years, the emphasis is now directed to class racing. This has provided an opportunity to reestablish a quantitative criteria for the overall winner of the Bucket Trophy.

The ‘Bucket Trophy’ will be presented to the overall winner of the 2017 St Barths Bucket. Yachts eligible for the prestigious award will be the class winners with five or more yachts in class.The class winner who prevails in the ‘most competitive, closely contested class’ will be the overall winner.

 The class with smallest series point differential between first and fourth place finishers will receive 1 point with each class in succession receiving 2, 3, 4 or 5 points. Additionally, the class with the least overall time differential (total time/total distance for all races) between the first and fourth place finishers will receive one point, with each class in succession receiving one additional point as above.

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 The above mentioned points will be added together for the overall competitive class score.  The class with the lowest number of points will be considered the ‘most competitive, closely contested class’.

 The winner of this class will be the overall winner of the 2017 edition of the St Barths Bucket.

 Should there be a tie, the class winner with the most yachts in class wins. In the event the tie remains unbroken, starting prowess will determine the overall winner (total time for all starts, from scheduled start to crossing the line – with the smallest total time prevailing).

Special Needs Children Project

St Barth schools have 40 special needs students with various motor and cognitive challenges. Outside the school system there are other island children with even more severe disabilities. The existing program facilities and services are not adequate to help these children and their families thrive.

This project supports the island’s first dedicated, handicap-accessible space suitable for assessment, treatment and coordinated support services, and provides the additional special educator and psychological services these children need to achieve greater autonomy, better school integration and a better quality of life.

The 2015 St Barth Bucket was proud to contribute to this initiative of the local St Barth Lions and Rotary Clubs.

Watch replay of all St. Barths Bucket Regatta races on TracTrac

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

St. Barths Bucket Regatta (Photo © Carlo Borlenghi / Studio Borlenghi )

 

St. Barths Bucket Regatta boats in action (Photo © Cory Silken)

The 30th edition of the St Barths Bucket will sail back into St. Barths  March 16-19. This year the fleet is 38 beautiful superyachts including six J Class boats battling it out for the historic Bucket trophy. Beyond the sailing, there’s a strong emphasis on ‘winning the party’ rather than the race, and as such, owners, guests and crew can look forward to celebrating in unparalleled style after hours.

In 1995, the beautiful French island of St Barths hosted its first Bucket Regatta and it has done so in March every year since then. Although the size of the yachts and competing fleet has grown significantly, the spirit of the event has remained unchanged. In recent years, 40 or more superyachts have gathered to compete for the Bucket in glamorous St Barths.

The magic in St Barths takes place both on and off the water, when the owners and crews fill the yacht haven before and after racing, with the special yacht Hop taking place on the Saturday evening. In keeping with the tradition, Perini Navi will host owners and guests at Casa Perini for memorable evenings overlooking Gustavia throughout the week.

The entire fleet will compete to take home the ‘Bucket’ trophy. While the stunning silver Perini Navi trophy will also be presented to the best classified Perini Navi competing in St Barths, won in 2016 by the talented crew onboard P2.

“We continue the commitment to maintaining the legendary “Spirit of the Bucket” — that wonderful balance of camaraderie,competition, sportsmanship and, of course, fun,” say the Event Stewards.

“Magnificent yachts from around the world are here for incomparable racing in the unspoiled waters off St Barthélemy. With many of the world’s most elegant and impressive superyachts in attendance, a fantastic J Class, and the debut of the Les Voiles Blanche (Corinthian Spirit) class, together we will write another distinguished chapter in the history of this regatta,” added the organizers.

 About teamwork:

 “We try hard to keep the same crew, because continuity is important to everything,” said Seahawk’s captain Gerhard Veldsman. “The more you can keep the same people, the better you end up sailing the boat, because everyone ends up knowing its limitations.”

 About evolution:

“The Superyacht game is heating up at a pretty rapid pace, and all in a good way,” said Peter Holmberg, helmsman of Rosehearty . “The owners are wanting to play harder and  faster, so the competitive side of it is going up and up and up. But like any segment of a sport that grows at this rate, you always have parts that are not up to speed.  A while back, safety was our first concern: we didn’t have clear rules to keep us all safe, so we realized that was a weakness in the game. (Ed: ISAF’s Appendix SY and heightened overall awareness has helped). Then the rating became the challenged portion of this game and the ORCsy Rule was developed and brought in here last year to fix that.”

 About the ORCsy Rule

“We’re happy with the system and how it rates the boats, because it’s creating exactly what we want out of pursuit superyacht racing, where it’s all about the tactics and good sailing coming into the finish,” said P2’s tactician Tony Rey. “Considering how different these boats are from each other, it’s quite an achievement for the ORCsy to have done this in one year, to be able to step back and just let us race each other and have it be this close on the score sheet and on the water. The basic concept is that they’ve used much more of a database analysis of the performance of the boats; there has been great transparency in terms of how they are coming up with the ratings; and they are listening to the owners and sailors.”

 About the experience:

“It’s almost heart stopping when you duck another J, because the helmsman turns the wheel and it’s 10-20 seconds before anything happens other than working out his arms,” said Ranger’s navigator Peter Isler, “The delays in ducking, close tacking or making any quick maneuver are just wild; it’s not like driving your sports car. It’s all judgement.”

What They Said… about the 016 St Barths Bucket Regatta

 “It’s a gathering, a rendezvous: a celebration of these great yachts, the owners , the crew and friends, with a regatta in the middle.” -Bruce Brakenhoff

Charities helped each year by the Bucket Entrants

 Each year the Bucket Regatta designates a portion of the entry fee for donation to a meaningful non-profit program in St Barths.

The Youth Sailing Program at the St Barths Yacht Club will receive the 2017 donation.

The St Barths Yacht Club is an active sailing school and their priority is the youth of St Barths. Here the children learn to respect each other and their environment, the sea. They also learn how to be responsible and cooperative in the pursuit of their goals.

SBYC offers many programs starting at very early ages. On an island learning to sail is as important as learning to swim. The St Barths Yacht Club tries its best to motivate and support its young people. Over 400 children participate every year.

The SBYC is not a conventional yacht club. Resources and budgets are far more limited than what one would expect to find in a typical club. The Bucket donation makes a significant and meaningful difference.

What They Said… about the 2016 St Barths Bucket Regatta

 “It’s a gathering, a rendezvous: a celebration of these great yachts, the owners , the crew and friends, with a regatta in the middle.” -Bruce Brakenhoff

The Yachts

38 yachts will race in this year’s event, ranging from 30 – 88 metres in length and with a speed differential from the fastest to the slowest in fleet of over four minutes per mile. Entrants for 2017, divided into five different classes, include; Unfurled, built by Vitters in collaboration with designer German Frers and the winner of last year’s race; Maltese Falcon, the biggest (and arguably most recognisable) yacht in the regatta at 88m, built by Perini Navi for the late Tom Perkins; and the elegant 48m Wisp, launched by Dutch shipyard Royal Huisman back in 2014. This year’s event also marks the debut of the Corinthian Spirit Class (Les Voiles Blanche), which offers a more lighthearted alternative to what is becoming an increasingly competitive race. Yachts in this class, which include the 56m Perini Bayesian and the 43m Koo by Vitters, will have no spinnakers and will require far less race preparation – which organisers hope will address a downward trend in entry numbers. This year also sees a record six J Class boats (originally introduced in the 1930s to compete in the America’s Cup) taking part in the race, including the 43m sloop, Topaz and the 44m Lionheart, both built in the last decade using unrealised designs from the 1930s.

 You can track the boats on the course each day on  TracTrac 

Photo © Michael Kurtz

Pursuit Class Entries — ORCsy
Yacht Builder Designer Model
Action (37m) Royal Huisman Dykstra NA sloop
Adela (55m) Pendennis Dykstra NA schooner
Aquarius (47m) Perini Navi Perini Navi ketch
Axia (38m) Palmer Johnson S&S ketch
Danneskjold (32m) Performance Yacht Dixon sloop
Elena of London (55m) F.N.M. Herreshoff schooner
Elfje (46m) Royal Huisman Hoek ketch
Ganesha (46m) Vitters Shipyard Dubois sloop
Huckleberry (39m) Alloy Yachts Langan ketch
L’ondine (30m) Southern Wind Farr sloop
Leopard3 (30m) McConaghy Farr sloop
Maltese Falcon (88m) Perini Navi Dykstra NA schooner
Meteor (52m) Royal Huisman Dykstra NA schooner
Nikata (35m) Baltic Nauta / J/V sloop
Ningaloo (45m) Vitters Shipyard Dubois sloop
P2 (38m) Perini Navi Briand sloop
Perseus^3 (60m) Perini Navi Ron Holland sloop
Q (52m) Alloy Dubois ketch
Rebecca (43m) Pendennis Frers ketch
Rosehearty (56m) Perini Navi Holland ketch
Sojana (35m) Custom Farr Farr ketch
Spiip (34m) Royal Huisman Frers sloop
Sunleigh (33m) Jongert Tony Castro sloop
Unfurled (46m) Vitters Shipyard German Frers sloop
Varsovie (31m) Nautor Swan Frers sloop
Visione (45m) Baltic Yachts Reichel-Pugh sloop
Win Win (33m) Baltic Yachts Javier Jaudenes sloop
Wisp (48m) Royal Huisman Hoek sloop
Zenji (56m) Perini Navi Ron Holland ketch
Pursuit Class Entries – ORCcs Les Voiles Blanche (Corinthian Spirit)
Yacht Builder Designer Model
Bayesian (56m) Perini Navi Perini Navi sloop
Escapade (37m) Fitzroy Yachts Dubois sloop
Koo (43m) Vitters Shipyard Dubois sloop

J Class Entries — J Class Association Rating Rule

Yacht Builder Designer Model
Hanuman (42m) J6 Royal Huisman Dykstra NA sloop
Lionheart (44m) J1 Claasen Jachtbouw Hoek sloop
Ranger (42m) J5 Danish Yacht S&S / Dykstra NA sloop
Shamrock V (37m) J3 Camper / Pendennis Nicholsons / Dykstra NA sloop
Topaz (43m) J8 Holland Jachtbouw Frank C. Paine sloop
Velsheda (40m) J7 Camper & Nicholson Nicholsons / Dykstra NA sloop

Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup (Photo by Carlo Borlenghi)

A record-sized fleet of the world’s largest performance yachts is readying itself in Porto Cervo, Sardinia for next week’s Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup. Organised by the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda and the International Maxi Association (IMA) with Rolex as title sponsor, this year’s event takes place over 4th-10th September and has 52 entries. Of these, 25 belong to members of the IMA, the body which since 1979 has been guiding and structuring maxi yacht racing globally, in collaboration with the world’s leading yacht clubs.

In terms of length, the fleet spans the giant 49.7m Ohana to entries at the shorter end of the IMA’s permitted size range – 60 footers such as Gérard Logel’s Swan 601 @robas and the Wally 60 Wallyño.

The biggest class at the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup will once again be the Wallys (an associated class within the IMA), which features 13 examples of the modernist high performance luxury yachts. Leading the charge off the Costa Smeralda will be the two Wallycentos, Sir Lindsay Owen Jones’ Magic Carpet Cubed and the latest example launched last October, David Leuschen’s Galateia, plus the elongated version, (now 32.7m) Open Season of International Maxi Association President, Thomas Bscher.


Photo: ROLEX / Carlo Borlenghi

The Supermaxi class has a formidable line-up including Irvine Laidlaw’s new Swan 115 Highland Fling 15, plus two Baltic Yachts-built high performance carbon fibre one-offs: the Nauta 115 Nikata and the Javier Jaudenes-designed Win Win – both making their Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup debuts. This year sees the return of Sir Peter Harrison’s Farr 115 ketch, Sojana, following a lengthy refit.

The Js are back this year. Lionheart and Velsheda will match race their way around the race track.

The Maxi class (79-100ft) will see two high profile yachts making their Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup debuts. Best known for her offshore program, Mike Slade’s Farr 100 Leopard 3 has travelled to the four corners of the earth to compete in races such as the Rolex Sydney Hobart, the RORC Caribbean 600 and the Fastnet Race, in which she has twice scored line honours victories.

Despite only being two years old, George David’s Juan Kouyoumdjian-designed Rambler 88, also has notched up thousands of sea miles. This year alone she has won the IMA’s annual Volcano Race (from Gaeta, Italy, south around the volcanic Aeolian Islands off northeast Sicily) and last week claimed line honours in the Palermo-Montecarlo race, the fourth and final event of the IMA’s inaugural Mediterranean Maxi Offshore Challenge.

The Maxi class also includes four entries from Southern Wind Shipyard, including the Farr-designed 100ft Blues and Michael Cotter’s Windfall. There are two SWS 82s: Massimilano Florio’s Grande Orazio was winner of the IMA’s Volcano Race in 2015, while Ammonite is brand new, campaigned by leading Australian skipper Marcus Blackmore.

Rolex Maxi 72 World Championship

As ever a major feature of the Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup is the Rolex Maxi 72 World Championship. This year six examples of the ultra competitive, owner-driven, grand prix racers will be lining up, their challenge being to dislodge Hap Fauth’s dominant Judel Vrolijk design, Bella Mente. The reigning Rolex Maxi 72 World Champion  goes into this year’s Worlds straight from victories at Copa del Rey MAPFRE and the inaugural Maxi 72 North American Championship held in Newport, RI in June.

“This is our favourite regatta,” commented Fauth, who is President of the Maxi 72 Class, which is affiliated to the IMA. “There will be six 72 footers and competition will be fierce. It is always challenging conditions both for the around the buoys and the coastal race. It is normally all you want.”

As to Bella Mente being favourite for a third World title, Fauth added: “We have the oldest boat and I am the oldest helmsman, but we have got a very good team. Our execution over the course of a regatta has been good and if there is one reason why we might have a small advantage it is because of that. But it is a very small advantage: The margin of victory in this fleet is two or three seconds – the boats are very close.”


Photo: ROLEX / Carlo Borlenghi

 

The Mini Maxi class (60-79ft) also has a strong line-up. Roberto Lacorte’s Mark Mills 68 Supernikka returns to defend her title, while she will be up against another Mills 68, the more thoroughbred racer, Prospector, which as Alegre and then Caol Ila R was one of the most competitive boats in what is now the Maxi 72 class. Also to be watched will be American Bryon Ehrhart’s Reichel Pugh 63, Lucky. Winner of last year’s Transatlantic Race, Lucky in her previous life was Loki, winner of the 2011 Rolex Sydney Hobart.

In 2015 the Mini Maxi Racer-Cruiser class had one of the tightest finishes and the top four boats return this year, including winner, Riccardo de Michele’s Vallicelli 80 H2O, which finished on equal points with Giuseppe Puttini’s Swan 65 Shirlaf (which this year will face stiff competition from new IMA member Marietta Strasoldo’s Swan 651 Lunz Am Meer.)

Andrew McIrvine, Secretary General of the IMA commented: “It will be an exciting year with a number of new boats competing, especially in the SuperMaxi division where a new generation of more race-oriented boats are appearing. The challenge of manoeuvring these huge craft around the tight courses around the islands of the Maddalena makes for a great spectacle and keeps so many sailors coming back year after year.”

Racing will take place over a mixture of windward-leeward and coastal courses. As usual there will be a magnificent social programme including the annual International Maxi Association Dinner and parties sponsored by Rolex and Audi.

Entry List

Maxi Yacht Rolex Cup 2016 Tracking

 

#sail #race #racing

 

A well earned overall triumph for the 33m Baltic built Win Win this year (Photo by Claire Matches ©www.clairematches.com)

A well earned overall triumph for the 33m Baltic built Win Win this year ©www.clairematches.com 

The Superyacht Cup, firm favourite with owners and sailors alike, has not only become the second-biggest event on the superyacht sailing calendar, but is also the longest running regatta of its kind in Europe. An exhilarating four-day event which perfectly mixes fun times with fierce racing in the Mediterranean’s most popular superyacht haunt, pretty Palma de Mallorca. An island known not only for its sun-drenched days but also for its beautiful bay, which because of its particular shape delivers a blissfully consistent sea breeze. Saudade’s tacticien, Volvo Ocean Race veteran, Bouwe Bekking agrees: “We’re happy how we sailed and of course the event is very nice and I think the owner will be back next year as well. Sailing-wise Palma is one of the best places in the world and very well served for superyachts.”

This extra special 20th Superyacht Cup came to a truly spectacular close yesterday afternoon, with a jubilant crowd cheering on the grinning sailors of the nine winning teams who took it in turns to storm the Superyacht Cup stage. After three days of hair-raising action it was the 33m Baltic built Win Win who claimed overall victory this year. An ecstatic Clive Walker, captain on board this carbon rocket, commented: “I’ve got a huge smile on my face. We’ve been trying to win a regatta ever since we launched the boat two years ago and we’ve finally done it, which is a huge relief. To be part of this team for the last eight years and having won with the old boat (Scorpione dei Mari) as well is incredible, just fantastic. A win-win situation!”

P2, with three bullets to her name, was the undisputed winner in Class B. In classic Class D it was the gleaming Herreshoff designed Mariette of 1915 who, also with a perfect score of three firsts, championed. In Class C the lovely Tempus Fugit proved victorious. No mean feat as she was up against a regular racer: the Vitters built Ganesha, and the ridiculously fast 35m Sojana. This speed balling boat recorded one of the highest speeds over the past few days, a whopping 17.98 knots, -she ended up clinching third. With all 22 competitors divided across four classes, racing was close and saw fast boats fighting tight battles. The ORCsy handicapping rule which was used at The Superyacht Cup again this year, also helped to turn out some of the tightest and most dramatic superyacht racing to date.

In classic Class D it was the gleaming Herreshoff designed Mariette who championed. ©www.clairematches.com

Yesterday’s final race day saw light conditions yet exciting sailing which perfectly rounded off three days of rip-roaring regatta action. Big boat races are close-knit affairs, which bring together the best of the world’s professional sailing talent with experienced enthusiasts. As the sun went down on this 20th edition, hundreds of happy Superyacht Cuppers will have made new friends and will be taking home sunny memories of yet another thrilling and fun-filled event. The 24m petite performer and Claasen built Hearbeat’s owner/tactician enthused: “The spirit is good, I just love it, it’s good racing, tight racing and very well organized. We’re very happy to be here every year. Unfortunately we’ll have to go back to Holland for refit so we won’t be here next year, but in 2018 we’ll be back to have some more fun and try and win again, just as we did in 2013!”

The 38m Perini P2 pulled out an undisputed and impressive win in Class B. ©www.clairematches.com

Although this edition’s line-up saw a number of freshly launched boats and first timers running around the race-course, this year’s fleet was also made up of tried and tested Cup veterans which have been returning to the island year after year for the regatta’s solid sea breeze, relaxed ambiance and social events to match the on-the-water-action. The high performing, award-winning 28m Kiboko Dos for example, she claimed third in Class C, competed for the third consecutive time this year.

Our much talked about party themed ’20 Years of Rock’, showed us a good amount of sailors rock the dance floor as much as they ruled on the race course. Owners and their guests were able to enjoy a thoughtfully prepared three course dinner, at what is, without a doubt, one of the loveliest dinner venues in the Mediterranean: The St. Regis Mardavall Mallorca. Thursday and Friday’s happy hours served up cold drinks to dilute the stress after three riveting hours on the race course and saw everyone from newbie crew to seasoned sailors discuss different takes on the day’s performance. Additionally, oodles of the most talented sailors could be seen chatting at the bar, with a beer in hand and a smile on their faces.

In Class C the lovely, modern classic Tempus Fugit proved victorious. ©www.clairematches.com

We would like to thank all the yachts of this year’s wildly diverse fleet for the past three days of hair raising sailing and of course our sponsors who have each helped make this edition another all-round success. And while we say ‘Hasta Luego’ to another memorable edition of The Superyacht Cup, a regatta where the atmosphere is relaxed, the sailing fast and the dock-side fun a given, we are already looking forward to seeing the world’s most gorgeous yachts take part in our next edition, June 2017. And although this 20th regatta will be a hard act to follow, plenty of competitors have already said they wouldn’t want to miss out on next year’s racing, we’re sure all fans of superyacht sailing will wholeheartedly agree!

Highlight of Saturday’s prize giving was of course the announcement of Win Win taking overall victory this year. ©www.clairematches.com
Sojana (Photo courtesy of Superyacht Cup Palma)

Sojana (Photo © www.clairematches.com )

“Competitive yacht racing, a relaxed informal social programme and the perfect location for superyachts – it does not get any better!”

The Superyacht Cup is the longest running superyacht regatta in Europe, a favourite with yacht owners, friends, captains and crew who visit Palma de Mallorca annually for the four day event. With warm early summer conditions and reliable sea breezes, the Bay of Palma offers some of the most idyllic racing conditions in the Mediterranean. The racing is run by the highly experienced international Race Officers and the team at Real Club Nautico de Palma. The participating superyachts are all moored together stern-to in the Superyacht Cup Regatta Village located at Muelle Viejo with the iconic Palma Cathedral and Palm tree lined Paseo Maritimo providing a stunning back-drop.

A five minute walk from the Regatta Village you can find Boutique City Hotels, first class restaurants, the best in international shopping as well as famous architecture, art galleries and historical museums. Palma has something to offer everyone visiting this international yachting event in a vibrant and cosmopolitan City.

Superyacht Cup 2016 Palma 2016 Entry List

Boat Size Design Shipyard
Atalante 39m Hoek Design Claasen Shipyard
Firebird 27m Humphreys Yacht Design Oyster Yachts
Ganesha 46m Dubois Naval Architects Vitters Shipyard
Germania Nova 55m Max Oertz Factoria Naval de Marin
Heartbeat 24m Hoek Yacht Design Claasen Shipyards
Inoui 33m Briand Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Kiboko Dos 28m Reichel/Pugh Southern Wind Shipyard
Mari Cha III 44.7m Briand Yacht Design Sensation Yachts
Mariette 41m N.G. Herreshoff Herreshoff Manufacturing Co
Naema 42m Hodgdon Yachts Graafship NL
P2 38m Philippe Briand Perini Navi
Penelope 30.7m Dubois Naval Architects Oyster Yachts
Salperton 45m Dubois Naval Architects Fitzroy Yachts
Saudade 45m Tripp Design Wally Yachts
Sea Wave 31.7 Farr Yacht Design Southern Wind
Sojana 35m Farr Yacht Design Fast Cruising
Stay Calm 24m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Tempus Fugit 27m Humphreys Yacht Design Arkin Pruva Yachts
Tenaz 39m Dubois Naval Architects Pendennis Shipyard
Tulip 26m Frers Yacht Design K&M Yacht Builders
Unfurled 45m Frers Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Visione 45m Reichel/Pugh Baltic Yachts
Win Win 33m Javier Jaudenes Baltic Yachts
Mariette (Photo courtesy of Superyacht Cup Palma)

Mariette (Photo courtesy of Superyacht Cup Palma)

 For 20 years now, the beautiful bay of Palma has been setting the stage for a mouth-watering selection of mega yachts to participate in a gripping superyacht regatta like no other. Most years, the Superyacht Cup draws entries from 300 tonne giants to sleek and slippery speed machines, but we’re excited to announce that it is during this ‘vintage’ edition that we’ll also see a selection of the iconic ‘classic’ schooners grace the racing circuit.

We already mentioned the 41m two-masted schooner Mariette of 1915 taking part. She was drawn up by Nathanael Greene Herreshoff, the renowned designer responsible for a whole array of unbeatable America’s Cup defenders. Although this seasoned sail yacht was built 100 years ago, she not only remains in fine form, (premium partners Pendennis‘ refit facilities keep her in tip-top shape), but also still races at the top of her game. She scored premium slot at the 2012 Pendennis Cup, and additionally claimed a respectable third place in last year’s Transatlantic Race, ahead of all-carbon racers Rambler and Comanche, no less

The stunning Mariette of 1915 will be up against one of our newest SYC additions: the 60m traditional gaff-rigged schooner Germania Nova. She was built as a true replica of the classic 1908 racing schooner Germania, using the same hull lines, deck- and sail-plans as designed by the acclaimed Max Oertz. The original Germania was built to kick stern and with a top speed of 19 knots, in one year alone, came first in more than half of the races in which she competed. For the new Germania this will be her very first outing on the race course. We already know she is on a par with her predecessor’s beauty and elegance…but will she also be able to match this record-breaker’s winning ways? We’ll need to wait another two months to find out.

The 60m traditional gaff-rigged schooner Germania Nova. Image courtesy of Northrop & Johnson.

Completing this jaw-dropping scene will be the 42m schooner Naema, designed by Hodgdon Yachts and built by Graafship NL.

The performance Perini P2 will be competing for the fourth time, yet this year this regatta regular will be sailed hard by a new crew with America’s Cup veteran Tony Rey on tactics. And even though she’s a new boat for the team, they’ve already claimed victory twice this year. First at the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta in Virgin Gorda where they triumphed in Class B and later during the St Barths Bucket: she won to hold on to the lead and edge out second-place finisher, the Vitters built Ganesha, by one point in overall scoring. We’re sure the 46m Indian deity will want to get her own back in Palma!

We’re also thrilled to see the 45m Visione return, no doubt owner and crew will have their sailing muscles flexed in order to continue last year’s battle with, amongst others, the highly competitive Inouï, (Vitters). The well powered Baltic-built beauty was designed by Reichel / Pugh – responsible for the lines of other rockets such as Magic Carpet 3. Although built in 2002, well before many other SYC competitors, she is still the boat to beat. She came second in class during Antigua’s Superyacht Challenge this year and took third in class during the St Barths Bucket in March.

The 45m well powered Baltic-built beauty Visione. Image: www.clairematches.com

Classic style yachts always look good on the water and the 46m Windrose of Amsterdam is no exception. She won the ShowBoats Award for Highest Technical Achievement just after her launch in 2001 and made headlines by breaking the Transatlantic record both in 2002 and 2005. This award-winning superyacht signed up last week, bringing our number of entrants up to a total of 22.

 For this silver edition the Superyacht Cup has teamed up with the Sailors for the Sea – Clean Regattas Programme. Main objective is cutting down on single use plastic bottles used onboard for racing. Changing habits is never easy, but with a bit of advance planning it can become easier, cheaper and will be a positive impact on the environment -protecting the waters we love to sail on. Mallorca-based Marine Hydraulic Solutions, leading provider for a complete service of maintenance, refit, repair and installation for hydraulic systems, will proudly provide thirsty sailors with free re-usable bottles which can be rinsed, refilled and chilled again. There will be a tent on-site from where MHS will distribute 20 bottles to each yacht and take care of the 18 litre refill containers, deposits and returns.

MHS offers a complete service for maintenance and installation of all hydraulic systems found on board and this year’s entry list is teeming with yachts that MHS has worked on previously, for example, the 26m carbon rigged racer Tulip or the new, larger and faster 39m Atalante, designed by Hoek Design Naval Architects and built by Claasen.

The 26m carbon rigged racer Tulip, only one of the SYC entrants MHS has worked on. Image: www.clairematches.com

Another two solid Superyacht Cup supporters which are also responsible for a broad spectrum of top-level superyacht solutions are silver sponsors Reckmann and Rondal. Rondal is a powerhouse of modern engineering expertise, situated in the heart of the skills-rich Dutch maritime sector. They create quality equipment, like spars, rigging, winches, feeders, hatches and entrances for the world’s finest superyachts, including many past and present SYC entrants. Equally as high standing are the custom projects delivered by the passionate people at Reckmann. For nearly 125 years, Reckmann has been at the forefront when it comes to high-performing sailing products, such as mast, rigging and hydraulic systems, as well as the full range of accessories in the regatta field.

Superyacht Cup Palma 2015 Fleet (Photo  ©www.clairematches.com)

Superyacht Cup Palma 2015 Fleet (Photo ©www.clairematches.com)

Last night’s disco-themed dock party proved epic with the entire crew of the mighty Marie wearing orange wigs, pink sunglasses, glitter, gold and green satin suits; these clear winners went all out and so, not surprisingly, took the best-dressed-in-disco prize: VIP tickets to Pacha‘s after party and a bottle of bubbly to boot. Also team Tulip, colorfully kitted out in, well, ‘Tulips’, scored tickets, as well as own it on the dance floor for most of the night; think slick break-dance moves and a spirited ‘polonaise’. DJ Eazy Michael kept those feet on the dance floor which was followed by Bilonda’s soulful tunes. All in all last night’s fun was a perfect ending to a great day out on the water..

This morning saw the SYC race village bustling with the owners, sailors, friends and guests of the 21 spectacular superyachts charged to get the second day of sailing underway. And while some of the world’s most talented sailors were ardently discussing today’s tactics, the scene was set for today’s second day of racing.

Today’s menu served up a blazing sun, cloudless blue sky and the sea breeze getting it’s foot in the door a little earlier than yesterday. While on our first race day the breeze actually built more than expected, becoming moderate to fresh for much of the afternoon, today was predicted to be even beefier with 12-14 knots around midday and 14-18 in the afternoon.
The fleet headed out at 11 to make their way to the start line and racing got underway at 13.00. It was yesterday’s Class C winner Clan VIII who got off the start line first. The 45m Perini got off to a cracking start but unfortunately at 14.00, as the yachts were on their first run to Bahia 2,  the race got abandoned and the fleet had to return to the start line. Racing commenced again at 14.50 with the race committee opting for a shorter 18.7nm course. This time it was the ferociously green hulled,Vitters built Inouï and Nautor’s Highland Breeze who boasted best starts.

The first upwind Sech mark saw first timer, the 25m Maegan, round ahead of the fleet, pursued closely by new-boat-on-the-block Guardian Angel and the 26m Tulip. Maegan flew at full bore towards Bahia 2 but was chased hard by Kiboko Dos who managed to hunt her down and jibe around the mark first.
In the mean time in Class C both Highland Breeze and Clan VIII were not having a good day at the office. Highland Breeze stayed close to the shore which made her lose her 7th position and Clan VIII tacked later than her competitors who then started to reel her in one by one. The 28m Southern Wind Kiboko Dos however got seriously into gear and held her front running position rounding the fourth Illetas mark first, after which she gunned it towards the finish line crossing 3.27 minutes ahead of speed machine Open Season and 4.16 minutes before the stylish Swan 90 Odin.”For tomorrow we would like to continue doing a good job, in fact we did a good job yesterday. I think that we have to keep pushing and try our best. The team works together really well and we are very happy” commented a beaming Raimon Pascó, captain on board Kiboko Dos.

Today’s Class B winner, the 28m Southern Wind Kiboko Dos. © www.clairematches.com

Possibly the many sailors with local knowledge on board were the secret behind Kiboko Dos’ success today as she pulled out her impressive class win in Class B.

In Class A the Vitters built classic ketch Marie showed again she was on top form by winning her second bullet while newbie boat Maegan’s potent performance secured the team with a victory in Class C. On the new ORCsy rule Maegan’s navigator and CEO of Oyster David Tydeman said: ” The new superyacht rule is working. Oyster’s built 35 boats over 80 feet and with the previous handicap system it wasn’t worth coming to these events but it is now and we’re having a great time and I’m going to be encouraging Oysters to come regularly”. Regatta regular P2 took second after Marie. “The owner was super happy, he said we couldn’t have gotten any more out of the boat and the crew couldn’t have done a better job, so we felt we left nothing on the table and the results after day 2 sort of show that” smiled Captain Jonathan Kline.

A happy crew on board Kiboko Dos today. ©www.clairematches.com

As crew make a post-debrief lay line for the Regatta Bar sponsored by North Sails, the owners and their guests head for the unique St. Regis Mardavall. A stunning resort framed by the Tramuntana mountains, the luxurious marina of Puerto Portals and the sparkling blue Mediterranean Sea. With one group on the southwest coast of the island and the other in Superyacht Cup central we’re certain in both places all talk will feature the final day of sailing tomorrow, as everything will come down to the crunch in Saturday’s ultimate showdown.

Connect with us through Twitter #SYC15 and Facebook (The Superyacht Cup) for real time updates of all the action on and off the race course and/or follow the race live via Trac Trac.

2015 Entry List

Boat Size Design Shipyard
Blue Too 34m Ron Holland Alloy Yachts
Clan VIII 45m Ron Holland Perini Navi
Gaia 30.6m Spirit Yachts Spirit Yachts
Ganesha 46m Dubois Naval Architects Vitters Shipyard
Guardian Angel 26m Humphreys Yacht Design Oyster Yachts
Heartbeat 24m Hoek Yacht Design Claasen Shipyards
Highland Breeze 34m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Inoui 33m Briand Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Kiboko Dos 28m Reichel/Pugh Southern Wind Shipyard
Maegan 25m Humphreys Yacht Design Oyster Yachts
Maria Cattiva 40m Bruce King Royal Huisman
Marie 55m Hoek Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Odin 27.7m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Open Season 30.4m Judel/Vrolijk Wally Yachts
P2 38m Briand Yacht Design Perini Navi
Perseus ^3 60m Ron Holland Perini Navi
Saudade 45m Tripp Design Wally Yachts
Tilakkhana 24m Wally Yachts Wally Yachts
Tulip 26m Frers Yacht Design K&M Yacht Builders
Visione 45m Reichel/Pugh Baltic Yachts
Win Win 33m Javier Jaudenes Baltic Yachts

 

© Claire Matches

© Claire Matches

 

Gathering together June 17-20th for three days of exciting racing in the Bay of Palma is a spectacular selection of the highest performing latest launches, well seasoned performance superyachts and beautiful modern classics. The racing is followed by warm evening dock-side parties creating the unique informal atmosphere the Superyacht Cup has become famous for.

One of the most striking superyachts on the circuit is the powerful 55m black ketch Marie (Hoek Design/Vitters Shipyard) who made her first visit to Palma in 2011 where she took third place overall to Drumfire (Hoek Yacht Design/Claasen Shipyard) and Heartbeat (Hoek Yacht Design/Claasen Shipyard). Since then she has raced at many of the superyacht events in Mediterranean, Caribbean and the USA.  In 2012/13 she went on to cruise extensively in the Pacific and New Zealand, finally sailing back to Europe via the Caribbean to revisit the Superyacht Cup this year. Marie is always an impressive sight on the race course and with her experienced crew she is going to be strong competition for the newer boats in the fleet.

 Marie by Claire Matches
Marie last participated in the Superyacht Cup Palma in 2011, here she is racing in the Caribbean last year. www.clairematches.com

The newest yachts to join the fleet this year will be the recently launched Oyster 825, Meagan (Humphreys Yacht Design/Oyster Yachts, 25m) and the sleek Javier Jaudenes designed 33m Win Win, built by Baltic. Both yachts will be participating at the Superyacht Cup for the first time, although the owner of Win Win won the event on his previous boat, Scorpione Dei Mari in 2010. Win Win participated at the two recent Caribbean regattas and showed great speed and agility.

 Claasen Shipyard, who have been sponsors of the Superyacht Cup since 2013, are celebrating their 30 year anniversary this year. They have built many of the present and past regular SYC Participants including 2011 winner Drumfire, 2nd in class 2012 Firefly and 2013 winner Heartbeat.

The Superyacht Cup has continued to develop partnerships with the leading suppliers to the superyacht industry and is pleased to announce two new silver sponsors, Evolution Sails and Ship Motion Group. Ship Motion Group is a globally active network of companies, focusing on motion-related products and luxury customization in vessels. Ship Motion is specialized in highly technical products and systems for yachts and commercial vessels such as propulsion systems, rudder systems and gyro stabilizers. Both Visione and Win Win are fitted with Ship Motion´s Retractable Propulsion Systems.

Evolution Sails is a worldwide maker of custom cruising, racing, grand prix and one design sails. Designing, building and servicing sails at the highest level is their standard. Their production lofts are among the largest clear span sailmaking lofts in the world, specializing is sails for larger boats. Their loft close to Palma is specifically set up for servicing, cleaning and storing sails for their superyacht clientele. During Superyacht Cup you can meet the team Ronny Keenan and Siggi Mansaker.

2015 Provisional Entries:

Boat Size Design Shipyard
Blue Too 34m Ron Holland Alloy Yachts
Clan VIII 45m Ron Holland Perini Navi
Gaia 30.6m Spirit Yachts Spirit Yachts
Ganesha 46m Dubois Naval Architects Vitters Shipyard
Heartbeat 24m Hoek Yacht Design Claasen Shipyards
Highland Breeze 34m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Inoui 33m Briand Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Kiboko Dos 28m Reichel/Pugh Southern Wind Shipyard
Maegan 25m Humphreys Yacht Design Oyster Yachts
Maria Cattiva 40m Bruce King Royal Huisman
Marie 55m Hoek Yacht Design Vitters Shipyard
Muzuni 30m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Odin 27.7m Frers Yacht Design Nautor Swan
Open Season 30.4m Judel/Vrolijk Wally Yachts
P2 38m Briand Yacht Design Perini Navi
Perseus ^3 60m Ron Holland Perini Navi
Saudade 45m Tripp Design Wally Yachts
Tulip 26m Frers Yacht Design K&M Yacht Builders
Visione 45m Reichel/Pugh Baltic Yachts
Win Win 33m Javier Jaudenes Baltic Yachts